nursing program = biology + chemistry ??

  1. I'm just wondering what is a nursing program like? Do you mainly take a lot of biology and chemistry classes? How do you know if you are going to like it? I mean i've only taken one intro. biology class a year ago, it was ok, i didn't really like it but i don't hate it. Haven't had any chemistry class since high school.... So if i don't like biology, does it mean that nursing is not right for me?
    I know the both ADN and BSN prepares you to take the RN exam, do you guys think that graduates from an ADN program will know enough to take the test? I mean how soon after you graduate do you take the exam? I noticed that some schools emphasize that they have like above 95% passing rate, but some people said it's really hard.... is it kind of similar to GRE/GMAT, just different subject?

    elleon
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   PennyLane
    The actual nursing classes don't have much chemistry involved. Biology is very important, as you will have to take Anatomy and Physiology before you start the program. The Pharmacology and Pathophysiology classes you'll take in the program will draw on this knowledge.

    That said, although I loved chemistry, I didn't much care for biology. But I loved Patho and A&P. Nursing is a blend of medical knowledge, hands-on skills, and people skills. And juggling skills help, too.

    An good ADN will definitely prepare you for the NCLEX-RN exam. Some people say these programs actually better prepare you to be an entry-level nurse. Hope this helps.
  4. by   Finallyat40
    75 questions (that's the minimum you can get). The program I was in had anatomy and physiology and microbiology in the pre-requisites, however the real program was very heavy in pathophysiology, clinical education, nursing process, etc. Yes, I feel that I am just as prepared as the new graduate from a BSN program with no experience....in fact, in terms of clinical skills, our program required us to be able to manage 5 acute med/surg patients effectively in order to meet the graduation requirements....the students from the local universities who were also graduating were juggling with 2 patients. That may just be here though.

    Oh yeah, as for the NCLEX preparation....every one of the graduates from my program who has taken the NCLEX has passed, there are still a few scheduled in the next few weeks, but I believe we were prepared to succeed!
    Jamie
  5. by   elleon
    Does it make a big difference if i get my ADN in a community college or a university? So basically there's really no way to find out if i'm interested in this field or not without actually going into a program.... sigh~~
    Thanks a lot, now i know it's more about biology and has little to do with chemistry...i personally like biology more than chemistry, which is a good thing i guess..


    Quote from PennyLane
    The actual nursing classes don't have much chemistry involved. Biology is very important, as you will have to take Anatomy and Physiology before you start the program. The Pharmacology and Pathophysiology classes you'll take in the program will draw on this knowledge.

    That said, although I loved chemistry, I didn't much care for biology. But I loved Patho and A&P. Nursing is a blend of medical knowledge, hands-on skills, and people skills. And juggling skills help, too.

    An good ADN will definitely prepare you for the NCLEX-RN exam. Some people say these programs actually better prepare you to be an entry-level nurse. Hope this helps.
  6. by   elleon
    75 is the minimum, so how many total questions are there? It sounds really hard, i have only had one intro. to biology, never had anatomy and physiology nor microbiology.....i'm so worried now...
    How do i find out if the program that i want to get into is a good one? I'm thinking of a community college cuz the tuition is lower..... or would you suggest a university?
    Btw, congratulations..so you are a RN now, right? :hatparty:


    Quote from Finallyat40
    75 questions (that's the minimum you can get). The program I was in had anatomy and physiology and microbiology in the pre-requisites, however the real program was very heavy in pathophysiology, clinical education, nursing process, etc. Yes, I feel that I am just as prepared as the new graduate from a BSN program with no experience....in fact, in terms of clinical skills, our program required us to be able to manage 5 acute med/surg patients effectively in order to meet the graduation requirements....the students from the local universities who were also graduating were juggling with 2 patients. That may just be here though.

    Oh yeah, as for the NCLEX preparation....every one of the graduates from my program who has taken the NCLEX has passed, there are still a few scheduled in the next few weeks, but I believe we were prepared to succeed!
    Jamie
  7. by   NurseTab
    Hi Elleon:

    Many RN programs require that you have some volunteer or practical work experience before you are even admitted to school.

    If you are unsure if you'll like the field I strongly recommend you take the time to volunteer in a local hospital. Try to get into a department that sounds interesting to you (I volunteer in the ER). Look at the nurses around you and see if you like the work they are doing. Listen to the conversations around you. Ask lots and lots of questions.

    Good luck to you!
  8. by   Finallyat40
    questions. Yes, it was hard, but so was the nursing program.....it's the most difficult thing I've ever done (and I'm 40 with lots of life experience). Do your research....Check with your state's board of nurse examiners and look at what the school's pass rates are on the boards. The program I graduated from boasts a >95% first time pass rate. It was also located at a community college and I'm thrilled to say that I graduated with no student debt....unlike my BSN cronies who all have at least $12,000 and up to $23,000 in debt! Now I can work on my BSN and let the hospital that I work for pay my tuition and fees!

    Yes, by passing the test, I am now an RN.....Finally at 40!
    Jamie
  9. by   Tony35NYC
    Quote from Finallyat40
    questions. Yes, it was hard, but so was the nursing program.....it's the most difficult thing I've ever done (and I'm 40 with lots of life experience). Do your research....Check with your state's board of nurse examiners and look at what the school's pass rates are on the boards. The program I graduated from boasts a >95% first time pass rate. It was also located at a community college and I'm thrilled to say that I graduated with no student debt....unlike my BSN cronies who all have at least $12,000 and up to $23,000 in debt! Now I can work on my BSN and let the hospital that I work for pay my tuition and fees!

    Yes, by passing the test, I am now an RN.....Finally at 40!
    Jamie

    Jamie,

    Congratulations to you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  10. by   tridil2000
    Quote from Finallyat40
    questions. Yes, it was hard, but so was the nursing program.....it's the most difficult thing I've ever done (and I'm 40 with lots of life experience). Do your research....Check with your state's board of nurse examiners and look at what the school's pass rates are on the boards. The program I graduated from boasts a >95% first time pass rate. It was also located at a community college and I'm thrilled to say that I graduated with no student debt....unlike my BSN cronies who all have at least $12,000 and up to $23,000 in debt! Now I can work on my BSN and let the hospital that I work for pay my tuition and fees!

    Yes, by passing the test, I am now an RN.....Finally at 40!
    Jamie
    congratulations finally! you are very wise to scoop up a bsn through your employer.
    i love wise nurses like yourself! we need MORE!!!

    tridiltrish
    38 and an rn for 18 years and got my bsn paid for too!
  11. by   elleon
    congratulations!!

    So what's considered a passing score for the RN exam?
    I'm planning to get my ADN next year after i graduate with a B.S. in psychology. Will i be able to have some form of tuition reimburstment too? What places usually offer this? Like big hospitals? I don't even know what should be my next step to being a RN.
    What should be expected throughout the whole ADN nursing program? The first thing is to get into one, then what usually happens and what's next? Do you take the exam right away? And how soon can you start looking for a job? Argh...i know a lot about all different career paths related to psychology, but i have no knowledge in anything related to nursing, PLEASE educate me!!
  12. by   carrot_thief
    I am planning on starting pre-reqs for the nursing program this summer, but I would like to know more in depth information about the pathophysiology part. If the courses are supposedly heavy in that subject...what exactly IS it? Can someone give me a description and an example of what some pathophysiology homework looks like?? Thanks. I'm also really worried about the biology aspect, but I hope I will do well.
  13. by   icyounurse
    Quote from Finallyat40
    75 questions (that's the minimum you can get). The program I was in had anatomy and physiology and microbiology in the pre-requisites, however the real program was very heavy in pathophysiology, clinical education, nursing process, etc. Yes, I feel that I am just as prepared as the new graduate from a BSN program with no experience....in fact, in terms of clinical skills, our program required us to be able to manage 5 acute med/surg patients effectively in order to meet the graduation requirements....the students from the local universities who were also graduating were juggling with 2 patients. That may just be here though.

    Oh yeah, as for the NCLEX preparation....every one of the graduates from my program who has taken the NCLEX has passed, there are still a few scheduled in the next few weeks, but I believe we were prepared to succeed!
    Jamie
    i graduated adn and we also took 5 pts while the bsn students on the same unit for the same course[med surg 2] only took 2.
  14. by   icyounurse
    Quote from carrot_thief
    I am planning on starting pre-reqs for the nursing program this summer, but I would like to know more in depth information about the pathophysiology part. If the courses are supposedly heavy in that subject...what exactly IS it? Can someone give me a description and an example of what some pathophysiology homework looks like?? Thanks. I'm also really worried about the biology aspect, but I hope I will do well.
    there isn't really written homework, its more like read 200 pages on heart disorders and take a test. pathophysiology is basically studying the body and different disease processes. like you do a section on different liver diseases, the causes, the treatments, nursing interventions specifically for liver diseases, preventing liver disease, complications of it, ect, ect. and then the next week you will do, say the neurological system for example. anyways, hope this helps.

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