Nursing: Not A Recession-Proof Career - page 4

by TheCommuter 11,002 Views | 32 Comments Senior Moderator

Contrary to widely held beliefs, nursing is certainly NOT the recession-proof career that many entities have seemingly made it out to be. During the recession of the early 1990s, some nurses in certain regions of the United... Read More


  1. 3
    Update on my lay-off.

    As some here know, I'm not an "old nurse" in age-years, but since I started young, I'm an old nurse in "nurse years" meaning...nearer the top of the pay scale.

    After the sale of my department and the ensuing layoff, the hospital was as I've said, "not enthusiastic" about keeping me on board in another department even though as they said, my patient care was "excellent."

    The nursing market is rapidly changing, obviously due to many socioeconomic factors and trends that if you aren't aware of, you should be. Most of it is profit driven.These changes imho are permanent and will continue.

    Nurses, are becoming appliances in an increasingly WalMart'ed system of health care delivery.

    So, after being laid off I went to task on making lemonade out of lemons: After a LOT of research, I was awarded full Training Benefits from the State. I submitted huge amounts of statistical RN employment data, current employment trends and projections, education requirement projections (see the IOM/tri-council reports) and rationales. I may very well be the first ADN-RN to not only succeed here, but to apply at all.

    I told the colleges' admission counselor, "don't be surprised if I'm not the first of many to cross your desk."

    Good luck and best wishes to all...it's tough out there.
    brandy1017, TheCommuter, and beeker like this.
  2. 0
    Quote from Guttercat
    Update on my lay-off.

    As some here know, I'm not an "old nurse" in age-years, but since I started young, I'm an old nurse in "nurse years" meaning...nearer the top of the pay scale.
    Thank you for the update.

    BTW, my workplace has an absolutely horrid wage grid for both new and experienced nurses alike. The wage grid starts at $23 hourly for new grad RNs and cuts off at $34 for the most experienced RNs. This is in a major metropolitan area with several million people.

    One of my coworkers has 23 years of nursing experience and earns a whopping $30 hourly. Another coworker has 40+ years of experience and earns $34 per hour. I personally think that seasoned nurses with many years of experience need to be paid much more than the peanuts that these two women earn.
  3. 0
    Guttercat, what are you going to do with the benefits? Are you leaving nursing - would be silly if you stayed now that you can get out...


Top