Nursing: Not A Recession-Proof Career - page 3

Contrary to widely held beliefs, nursing is certainly NOT the recession-proof career that many entities have seemingly made it out to be. During the recession of the early 1990s, some nurses in... Read More

  1. Visit  TheCommuter} profile page
    1
    Quote from Guttercat
    I was just laid off due to the sale of my department.

    Let's just say that despite my ten years of service and twenty years of experience, or rather I should say because of, the hospital was not exactly enthusiastic about reabsorbing me into another department.

    The unemployment office here in town told me that they've seen an alarming number of laid-off RN's hit their doors in the last two years which is something they've never seen before.
    The internet is filled with many sob stories and anecdotal evidence of seasoned, older, experienced nurses being terminated and replaced with less-experienced nurses who can be paid significantly less money.

    However, the corporations who engage in these deplorable hiring practices would never admit that they terminated an older nurse's employment due to federally protected issues such as age. These same folks would also never admit to shedding expensive labor to make room for cheaper labor.

    This situation is so sad and despicable. I am sorry that you were laid off, and I certainly hope that this situation ends with a silver lining that benefits you. Good luck to you!
    Guttercat likes this.
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  3. Visit  Guttercat} profile page
    0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    The internet is filled with many sob stories and anecdotal evidence of seasoned, older, experienced nurses being terminated and replaced with less-experienced nurses who can be paid significantly less money.

    However, the corporations who engage in these deplorable hiring practices would never admit that they terminated an older nurse's employment due to federally protected issues such as age. These same folks would also never admit to shedding expensive labor to make room for cheaper labor.

    This situation is so sad and despicable. I am sorry that you were laid off, and I certainly hope that this situation ends with a silver lining that benefits you. Good luck to you!

    The problem is in getting past the anecdotal in a way that reflects an accurate picture.

    But as you said, the corporate machine has built-in firing and layoff practices that are damned near impossible to trace/track as to the true motive.

    We've only seen the tip of the iceberg, and the available data has not caught up with current trends/stats of unemployment. In my state, the number of new grads cranked out each year has doubled over the last eight years, thanks to a decade-long (and still going strong), multi-entity, concerted effort increasing enrollment in nursing schools... to the tune of millions of taxpayer dollars.
    As a side note, one of our local hospitals just laid off fifteen medical transcriptionists. Their jobs were shipped to India.
  4. Visit  windsurfer8} profile page
    0
    The key is to be FLEXIBLE. I graduated BSN program in '07. I did 2 years med/surg..and psych since then. The thing I did is I MOVED. I went to Wyoming! They were hiring like mad. I got my experience and then moved to Maine to do psych. If you are willing to move you can fine areas in the country where they really need nurses. I know older nurses maybe can't do this, but I advise students to be open to moving. Even for a year or two. Get some experience then places are more likely to hire you. Worked for me!
  5. Visit  TheCommuter} profile page
    0
    Quote from windsurfer8
    The key is to be FLEXIBLE. I graduated BSN program in '07. I did 2 years med/surg..and psych since then. The thing I did is I MOVED. I went to Wyoming! They were hiring like mad. I got my experience and then moved to Maine to do psych. If you are willing to move you can fine areas in the country where they really need nurses. I know older nurses maybe can't do this, but I advise students to be open to moving. Even for a year or two. Get some experience then places are more likely to hire you. Worked for me!
    I also relocated to another state for more job opportunities.

    However, many people cannot or will not move due to personal preferences, lack of relocation money, being enmeshed with extended family members, lack of openness to new experiences, or feeling deep emotional ties to the area in which they currently live.

    Many people are what I refer to as 'location-stable.' They will stay in places in the face of a lack of opportunity (high unemployment rates, dismal local job market, declining local economy, etc.). Instead of migrating elsewhere, location-stable people would rather wait things out and hope that the jobs return to their geographic area.
  6. Visit  Guttercat} profile page
    3
    Update on my lay-off.

    As some here know, I'm not an "old nurse" in age-years, but since I started young, I'm an old nurse in "nurse years" meaning...nearer the top of the pay scale.

    After the sale of my department and the ensuing layoff, the hospital was as I've said, "not enthusiastic" about keeping me on board in another department even though as they said, my patient care was "excellent."

    The nursing market is rapidly changing, obviously due to many socioeconomic factors and trends that if you aren't aware of, you should be. Most of it is profit driven.These changes imho are permanent and will continue.

    Nurses, are becoming appliances in an increasingly WalMart'ed system of health care delivery.

    So, after being laid off I went to task on making lemonade out of lemons: After a LOT of research, I was awarded full Training Benefits from the State. I submitted huge amounts of statistical RN employment data, current employment trends and projections, education requirement projections (see the IOM/tri-council reports) and rationales. I may very well be the first ADN-RN to not only succeed here, but to apply at all.

    I told the colleges' admission counselor, "don't be surprised if I'm not the first of many to cross your desk."

    Good luck and best wishes to all...it's tough out there.
    brandy1017, TheCommuter, and beeker like this.
  7. Visit  TheCommuter} profile page
    0
    Quote from Guttercat
    Update on my lay-off.

    As some here know, I'm not an "old nurse" in age-years, but since I started young, I'm an old nurse in "nurse years" meaning...nearer the top of the pay scale.
    Thank you for the update.

    BTW, my workplace has an absolutely horrid wage grid for both new and experienced nurses alike. The wage grid starts at $23 hourly for new grad RNs and cuts off at $34 for the most experienced RNs. This is in a major metropolitan area with several million people.

    One of my coworkers has 23 years of nursing experience and earns a whopping $30 hourly. Another coworker has 40+ years of experience and earns $34 per hour. I personally think that seasoned nurses with many years of experience need to be paid much more than the peanuts that these two women earn.
  8. Visit  netglow} profile page
    0
    Guttercat, what are you going to do with the benefits? Are you leaving nursing - would be silly if you stayed now that you can get out...


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