nursing liability insurance companies - page 2

I'm looking to purchase a liability insurance policy. I've applied with NSO. I really don't know of any other nursing liability insurance providers except for NSO because they advertise so... Read More

  1. by   suzanne4
    The facility is always going to put their interest before you. And that is not always in your favor................
    Your choice but I would rather have peice of mind for under $100 per year.
  2. by   mscsrjhm
    Dear nurses,

    Facilities are defending the actions of the employees, which includes YOU, the employee. The defense attorneys are pulling in as many hours as possible to bill the insurance company that they are representing. It is their job to make the action defensible. They WANT you to look like the greatest employee ever, to reduce the action to a simple oversite.
    The facility is only paying insurance premiums, the insurance company is footing the bill for the defense. So, the facility isn't pulling the strings at that point (after receiving litigation notice). Two co-litigants having separate attorneys, working separately and against each other, simply because one litigant wanted the defense 'her way' would not only never work, the attorneys would not stand for it.
    As it takes sooo very much money to litigate, the only profitable way attorneys can work is to go after the money. If a person has 1 million in insurance, that is the direction they will go.
    Again, there is obvious misunderstanding from nurses relating to the legal industry. And again, I digress.
    My question: Any idea how to find out how many nurses were named as litigants, and did they have insurance?

    (I don't wish to sound snappy towards anyone. I have some definite asperger traits. Probably should see somone, but that is a direction I don't wish to exert any energy into.) (Sorry, did it again)

    Mschrisco
  3. by   dphrn
    Quote from Mschrisco
    Dear nurses,

    Facilities are defending the actions of the employees, which includes YOU, the employee. The defense attorneys are pulling in as many hours as possible to bill the insurance company that they are representing. It is their job to make the action defensible. They WANT you to look like the greatest employee ever, to reduce the action to a simple oversite.
    The facility is only paying insurance premiums, the insurance company is footing the bill for the defense. So, the facility isn't pulling the strings at that point (after receiving litigation notice). Two co-litigants having separate attorneys, working separately and against each other, simply because one litigant wanted the defense 'her way' would not only never work, the attorneys would not stand for it.
    As it takes sooo very much money to litigate, the only profitable way attorneys can work is to go after the money. If a person has 1 million in insurance, that is the direction they will go.
    Again, there is obvious misunderstanding from nurses relating to the legal industry. And again, I digress.
    My question: Any idea how to find out how many nurses were named as litigants, and did they have insurance?

    (I don't wish to sound snappy towards anyone. I have some definite asperger traits. Probably should see somone, but that is a direction I don't wish to exert any energy into.) (Sorry, did it again)

    Mschrisco

    You have written a lot of statements regarding how attorneys would defend a nurse. Where do you get this information, or is it just your opinion? I don't mean to be snappy either, but I truly would like to know what support you have for your statements? If it is valid, it is definately worth knowing.
    Last edit by dphrn on May 31, '04
  4. by   mscsrjhm
    Understood.
    Worked a few years for attorneys practicing excusively in Med/mal/neg cases. Considered going to lawschool, but I enjoy my morals too much. (kidding).

    I don't think a google search would work. The public can obtain only the records showing the initial filing, including the litigants (which would include nurses/employees names). However, most settlements contain a confidentiality clause, so the rest of the information is closed to the public.
    The nurse litigant could not discuss the case, but could state whether she had insurance or not.

    Companies taking money from hard-working people, who do not have all information required to make a knowledgable decision, well this angers me.

    Any other ideas? I am open to any suggestions.

    Mschrisco
  5. by   pickledpepperRN
    I don't have a link but I read in the paper a few years ago about an RN who was sued buy the hospital that fired her after losing a lawsuit by the family of a patient who had fallen out of bed.
    The nurse, who had malpractice insurance settled out of court.
    In the first article that nurse was worried about her house and bank account.
    Terms of the settlement were not disclosed.
  6. by   lovinghands
    We had a case in my state in which a teenager died in a state facility from heat exhaustion. The techs, RNs, agency management and the state were sued by the teenager's family. The techs and RNs were also criminally investigated and the charges were filed, though later dismissed.

    I don't know if that particular nurse had liability insurance but I do know the state's liability insurance debated about paying for the workers' legal defense as they in the state's opinion had not followed policy. It was a mess and I remember thinking at the time that I hoped the RN had her own liability coverage because she was being fed to the hounds (the governor made that clear in media statements).

    I just accepted an RN position in a state hospital that I have worked at for a long time as an aide. Because of the above situation and type of work (acute psych), I will most definitely being pursing liability insurance. It's worth the peace of mind.

    Thanks all for the heads up on NSO
  7. by   mscsrjhm
    Quote from lovinghands
    We had a case in my state in which a teenager died in a state facility from heat exhaustion. The techs, RNs, agency management and the state were sued by the teenager's family. The techs and RNs were also criminally investigated and the charges were filed, though later dismissed.
    Quote from lovinghands

    I don't know if that particular nurse had liability insurance but I do know the state's liability insurance debated about paying for the workers' legal defense as they in the state's opinion had not followed policy. It was a mess and I remember thinking at the time that I hoped the RN had her own liability coverage because she was being fed to the hounds (the governor made that clear in media statements).

    I just accepted an RN position in a state hospital that I have worked at for a long time as an aide. Because of the above situation and type of work (acute psych), I will most definitely being pursing liability insurance. It's worth the peace of mind.

    Thanks all for the heads up on NSO


    Some insurance policies specify: intentional acts. Example would be racism. this could be considered an intentional act.
    The insurance companies are trying to get out of suits.
  8. by   Quailfeather
    I have recently signed up for liability insurance through NSO, as well. Years ago, I had the same coverage through a company called Professional Buyers Guild. I don't know if they still exist, though. About 6 years ago I was named as one of many defendants in a lawsuit by a disgruntled man who had undergone a forensic exam as a rape suspect. In California, a rape suspect cannot refuse an exam if they are under arrest. Charges against him were eventually dropped and somehow it came to light that he had not been arrested properly on the night that he was brought into our ER for the exam. So, he decided to sue the city, the county, all of the law enforcement agencies involved, the hospital, the doctor, and me. He claimed that the various agencies violated his civil liberties and subjected him to assault and battery. I think most of the agencies ended up settling out of court. My hospital settled, on the condition that I was dropped from the suit. The hospital risk manager and their attorney were very supportive of me. Interestingly enough, when I contacted Professional Buyers Guild, their representative told me that the liability coverage was only good if I did something outside my scope of practice or was intentionally negligent and the hospital would not cover me. They wouldn't even refer me to an attorney. Needless to say, I dropped that policy and went for years without liability coverage. Last month I signed up with NSO because the Emergency Nurse Association recommended them. I hope they are better than the last carrier I had.

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