Nursing Jobs- 1 year of experience?

  1. Hi Everyone,
    I am currently a nursing student and will be starting clinicals in the fall. I recently search the internet to see what jobs will be available to me in Maryland once I graduate. Most of the job annoucements that I see require at least one year of experience. Although I have thought about finding a job in a hospital once I complete my first year of clinicals, I really do not what to leave the job I am currently working as a clerk/typist. My manager and supervisor are very nice and this is a sure pay check. I work part time during the school year and full time during the summer. I make my own schedule arranging and rearranging it as I see fit to accomedate my school schedule, this include taking off mutiple days to study during finals (with no questions or complaints from management). I do more that 50% of my class assignment on my job so I have alot of flexiblity. I know even if I choose to take a position at a hospital I would not leave my current employers. Although I would like to do both, I am afraid that I will not be able to fully concentrate on my classes my senoir year. If I decided not to work at a hospital how will I meet the experience requirement? I would love to get the hands on experience that working in a hospital will give me but my current employers are so encouraging and will do just about anything to ensure that I successfully graduate (my manager has told me that if I am give a summer externship that I could take a leave of absence and return when the summer is over or if I am offered and decide to continue my externship that I could keep my job as long as I came in at least one day a week!). OK all the rambling boils down to one question , how do new grads qualify for jobs that ask for at least one year of experience (as most of them do) unless we work in a hospital or some other health facility before we graduate? Do clinicals count as experience? Thanks in advance for any responese. :spin: :roll
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   RN4NICU
    Clinicals do not count because everyone has them - it is implied that clinical experience was gained in the education program.

    Some places will stick to their 1 yr requirement like glue and others, although they prefer someone with experience (so they don't have to finance a 3-month preceptorship for an employee that may decide that the particular unit is not for him/her, leaving the unit out the $$ AND the employee), but if they are desperate, they will take anyone with a license and a pulse. Depends on the supply and demand of new grads in the area, which is mostly impossible to predict from year to year.

    Be careful about working too much while in school - many of my classmates did this and did not make the grade (C = out of the program). Experience will come. There was no nursing shortage when I graduated. Everyone wanted experience and no one wanted to give it. Hospitals were cutting back RN positions in favor of hiring unlicensed assistive personnel. (Patients started dying and all of a sudden, RNs were valuable again!) It was not easy, but you know what? I got a job. It was not in the area that I wanted, but it gave me experience and, eventually, I got into the NICU and planted myself there (and grew roots!)
    By the way, internet job postings rarely reflect the actual market. Try a current nursing journal - there are new grad training programs listed almost everywhere.
    Good luck and keep us posted with your progress!
  4. by   FarmgrrlRN
    I can only speak for my area...they have a nsg job fair every Feb in which the nursing students from the area schools meet with the hospital recruiters. Also, if you can get in a position at a hospital (preferably flexi/resource) there are a couple of perks. #1 you get your foot in the door #2 they can get a look at you and decide if you're the kind of employee they want #3 you get a look at them and decide if they're the kind of employer you want #4 you set your schedule w/flexi positions

    I just wrapped up my first year of school and got a job easily with the big employer in this area as a safety partner (sitter). Its a great position that allows me to study as well as participate in pt care. They schedule me 1 day a week according to my availability. I can pick up any addt'l hours that I want. Its definitely something to consider IMHO.
  5. by   IamRN
    Every nursing unit I have worked at has at one time or another had GN amongst the staff. Internships in general only take GNs. When I did my ICU internship there were some of us that already had experience, but the majority were GNs.

    I have always wanted to work in NICU, but my path started in the adult world. There are many hospitals in my area offering NICU internships, but the give preference to GNs.

    Having your foot in the door as an is a big positive, but you have to make getting through w/school first a priority. Your present job sounds like a dream job for any student, much more a nursing student!

    I know plenty of RNs that never worked in a hospital setting before their first job as a bedside nurse; myself included. Can't deny, though, that the familiarity with the inner workings of hospital ward is a positive. The familiarity initially, would put you ahead a bit, but as many others have done, one adapts.

    If you are curious about the opportunities for GNs in your area you can always call up nurse recruiters at your local facilities and inquire about the current positions open for GNs.

    Good luck!
  6. by   NewEastCoastRN
    When I was in school I had a job just like the one you are describing. Besides doing that, I also worked as a nurse assistant in a hospital every other weekend, and I found that experience to be great to help me prepare for my first job. My advice is to keep the job you have. You have the rest of your life to be a nurse, enjoy having a nice desk job while you can. If you want to work in a hospital, many of them are so flexible that you could do just one shift a week or every other weekend. I know that is the case at the hospital I work at in Maryland. And don't worry about your nurse assistant experience when applying for a job, there is such a shortage you shouldn't have a problem.
  7. by   CNMtobe2012
    Quote from IamRN
    Every nursing unit I have worked at has at one time or another had GN amongst the staff. Internships in general only take GNs. When I did my ICU internship there were some of us that already had experience, but the majority were GNs.

    I have always wanted to work in NICU, but my path started in the adult world. There are many hospitals in my area offering NICU internships, but the give preference to GNs.

    Having your foot in the door as an is a big positive, but you have to make getting through w/school first a priority. Your present job sounds like a dream job for any student, much more a nursing student!

    I know plenty of RNs that never worked in a hospital setting before their first job as a bedside nurse; myself included. Can't deny, though, that the familiarity with the inner workings of hospital ward is a positive. The familiarity initially, would put you ahead a bit, but as many others have done, one adapts.

    If you are curious about the opportunities for GNs in your area you can always call up nurse recruiters at your local facilities and inquire about the current positions open for GNs.

    Good luck!

    What is a GN?
  8. by   CNMtobe2012
    Thanks everyone for your replies as they were all helpful.
  9. by   Nurse Ratched
    Quote from alejuandria
    What is a GN?
    GN = graduate nurse - someone who has graduated nursing school but not yet passed the boards.

    Many hospital policies allow them to do most things a nurse can under the direct supervision of a licensed nurse. In my facility one has 90 days from time of hire as a GN to gain licensure.
  10. by   CNMtobe2012
    Quote from Nurse Ratched
    GN = graduate nurse - someone who has graduated nursing school but not yet passed the boards.

    Many hospital policies allow them to do most things a nurse can under the direct supervision of a licensed nurse. In my facility one has 90 days from time of hire as a GN to gain licensure.
    Thanks for the clarification I haven't quite caught on to all the nursing abbreviations.
  11. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from alejuandria
    Thanks for the clarification I haven't quite caught on to all the nursing abbreviations.
    One reason some persons never hear of the GN is some states do not allow GNs to practice. My state and several others that I know of do not acknowledge GNs. The new grad either works as a tech until license is issued or does not actually begin working in the position at all until the license is issued.
  12. by   Farkinott
    At first it seems like you are stuck between the devil and the deep blue sea but in reality you are not. You are in a position that many, many nursing students would like to be in! I would advise that you stay with your job, as you have the flexibility to suit your educational schedule. Anything that reduces stress during your course should be exploited for all it's worth.
    Your employers sound wonderful and you are obviously valuable to them so why change? Agreed, you would gain some experience working in a health facility. The main bonus I think would be getting inside the "culture" of the place, but if you have a good head on your shoulders you will gain knowledge quickly once you are qualified.
    If you were working in the facility you want to work in once you are qualified then doing part time work within it, is an advantage in that you get your face known. Conversely, I know that employers look favourable on people who have worked to support themselves whilst studying to better themselves (regardless of employment type).
    In short, don't quit your job as your boss will (I hope) give you a glowing reference that part time experience in a hospital cannot buy.

    All the best...................

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