nursing career - page 3

I am a man and I'm thinking of becoming a nurse. I've just started my first semester of college and I've been truly interested in the nursing field. Are any of you male nurses? For you female nurse... Read More

  1. by   fergus51
    I totally agree with you that the majority of nurses need to become more vocal and demand change. I just don't like that it is assumed that men have the balls to do so and women don't (not a very good expression here perhaps... ). I have seen no evidence that the majority of men are any more active than women in nursing.
  2. by   wildtime88
    Fergus51,

    I have never seen a actual majority of men in nursing except for times in ER. Those nights were actually quite different.

    Most of the time what you see is one or two guys working and are quite the minority.

    Do a little research on Nurse Anesthetists and see what the difference between male to female ratio is when compared to all the other areas of nursing. Also look at the make up of past and present leadership of their national organization

    It is some what hard to believe that they are nurses.

    Also see if you can compare them to Nurse Practitioners as far male to female ratio.

    Also try to compare the NPs with Physician's assistants as far as gender make up, but with them you would also have to account for past gender make up as well.
  3. by   NRSKarenRN
    Welcome, Nate!

    I graduated in 1977 from a LPN program with one male classmate....1982 BSN program had 4 males; my LPN colleague attended my college and graduated the year after me.

    I ocassionally run into them at local hospitals...all continue in the field. My first Home Health agency owner in 1984 was a Male RN. Ed's agency thrived because of his business acumen and nursing expertise (loaned MY services to another agency...at $40hr in 1992; he got $5,000 when they hired me FT).

    Currently, my home care agency has 4 male RN's and patients repeatedly request them upon hospitalization.

    Might be interesting for you to visit:

    Men in American Nursing History
    http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/6011/

    The American Assembly for Men in Nursing
    http://aamn.freeyellow.com/

    Luther Christman, PhD,RN,FAAN is chairman of the board and started in nursing in the 1960's I believe. I have heard him speak eloquently at several ANA conventions and he has helped mold the nursing profession.

    Still Not Much of a Guy Thing
    http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/webzi.../guything.html

    Men in Nursing Mentoring Task Force at University of Iowa:
    http://www.nursing.uiowa.edu/student...mentor_men.htm

    Yahoo Club: Men in nursing
    http://clubs.yahoo.com/clubs/meninnursing

    Have worked with many men over the years and we learned from each other. Hope you find a rewarding position. Karen
  4. by   fergus51
    Wild
    I have been told that CRNAs make more and are more respected than NPs or CNMs, but we don't have any CRNAs in my province as far as I know so I am not very familiar with them. The only nurse anethetist I have seen here was a female one in from Nepal doing a tour of the OR and watching procedures.

    When I say the majority of male nurses, I don't mean that they make up the majority of nurses anywhere, I mean I see no evidence that say... 90% of the female nurses are weak and 90% of the male nurses are not. What I am saying is that I don't see any more participation and decisive action among male nurses than female ones. I don't see them refusing unsafe patient loads, commanding better wages or resolving conflicts with quick confrontation any more often than a female nurse does. Maybe you would argue that is because they have been sucked into a feminine way of behaving because they are in nursing? I understand that argument, I just don't think so.

    You probably know I work L&D and I don't have any men on the unit, so my experiences with male nurses while floating or during union stuff may be insufficient to really know how active male nurses are compared to female ones, but in my experience personality traits don't have a gender.

    The areas in my hospital with the most men seems to be emerg and ortho. I float to both places as a workload nurse (only doing tasks because I refuse to take a patient load on a floor I am not trained on) and I just don't see the male nurses acting really differently than the female ones. Maybe our female nurses are more like men or the male nurses are more like women, but they certainly aren't from different planets! Some stand up for themselves, others don't.
  5. by   Rottie1
    I just read all the post on male nursing. Wow what a topic. Wild's first post was something else! I read that and wondered if he had ever worked where I am currently working. I have to say that I agree with what was said.
    I have been told by my supervisor in my evaluation that I am too "out spoken" and that I should take care with the new nurses and be more gentle when offering feedback. I strive to do my best and expect anyone else I work with to do the same. I shouldn't have to lower my standards just because some one is going to cry when I tell him/her that something was done incorrectly.

    Anyway, Nate, If this is what you would like to do, more power to you. You have heard many opinions and only you can make the decision for yourself.

    Good luck! And remember there are many options in nursing.
  6. by   tattoochick
    Well, from my experience...in school still (graduate in May), my professors LOVE the male students. They want men to come into nursing because it helps with the shortage, and guys are usually better at skills and hands-on stuff than girls, at first at least. I only got to know some male nurses in the ER and they were all really, really good. Always on top of things and what not. The only thing that my guy-nursing student friends tell me is that they struggled with psych where you just talk to patients and try to get them to work through their feelings. But, other than that, they love it!
  7. by   old-master
    I am a male student Rn, and current work with ALL female LVN's in a detox center. They never backstab or talk down to one another. But the CNA I work with do, male and female. Nursing is a calling, and you are born to it. We need men and women to answer the call to Nursing, and come there to do only good. Money is only a human made-entrapment. foucs on that when you go home and watch the news, you can say to yourself that you tried to help the world on person at a time.

    So, follow your heart and go to school before you finish you will know. And if you find that your coworkers are plotting......than do your job and stay out of it.


    Now, I am a Martial Arts student has well, and I have beaten by more women than men.
    So, food for thought on those Tea-party theory!
    old-master has spoken......
  8. by   nurs4kids
    Originally posted by wildtime88
    I prefer to date women who are not submissive and who are intellengent .
    oh really? lol
  9. by   wildtime88
    Intelligent


    Happy?

    I made a spelling error. My guess is that it was intelligible enough for everyone else to understand.

    It was not the first and it will not be the last.
    Last edit by wildtime88 on Jan 7, '02
  10. by   debbyed
    Nate,

    I love all the nurses in my ER regardless of sex (or lack of), race or what planet they are from. We all work together, and all work just as hard as our teammates. I wouldn't change professions.

  11. by   wildtime88
    Nate,

    debbyed is right.

    Lazzyness runs equally in both sexes. Most of us work our asses off.

    If you like to work and at a fast pass plus see something new every day or even every hour, then work in the ER. You never know what might even walk through the door.

    That is if you choose to come into nursing.

    You need to check out the another section on this board "Would you recommend nursing as a career?"


    http://allnurses.com/forums/forumdis...?s=&forumid=87
    Last edit by wildtime88 on Jan 7, '02
  12. by   teeituptom
    Ive been in nursing a long time now, and for the most part have enjoyed it thoroughly. Usually its me who starts a lot of controversy, glad to see its somebody else getting hit on.
    If you decide you like it,go for it. Ive lived rather comfortably and have raised 7 kids with nursing being the sole income for the family.And still manage to keep my golf game in good form. Golf is my prozac.
    You will find nursing to be a challenge, a committment, almost a lifestyle,overwhelming,fascinating.and at times downright freaky. But for whatever you want you can find it there. The excitement and challenge of Er or critical care, The slower less challenging pace of floor work, the love of the elderly while working nursing homes, The close ties in working in a doctors office. The responsibility in corporate nursing. The thrill of flight nursing. Whatever you want its there, Me,Im hardcore adrenalin junkie, still cant get enough of the ER. Hell if I know why. But for sure, you can find anything you want to do somewhere in the field of nursing.
    Nursing is changing at an ever increasing pace, getting a little hard for me to keep up with all the changes. Wild was talking about male vs female nurses. To me they are just all nurses, some good, some not so good, and some bad, just like any other profession.Yes its still female dominated, but I read an article that talked about male nurses accounting for I believe it said 6 percent of the workplace. But that males are in 37 percent of the leadership roles.when you talk about charge positions,administration,nursing organizations and all that stuff. So is really female dominated.I dont really think thats the issue.
    But good luck and god bless if you intersted in it.
    my free advice to survive in nursing is
    TAKE UP THE GAME OF GOLF
    THOMAS LIVINGSTON
    teeituptom@hotmail.com
  13. by   jmcclellanprofrn
    I'm glad people are still finding interest in nursing, especially men. I love working with the guys! Men tend to drift towards fast pace work like the ER where I work. It's a great career choice, there are plenty of possibilities. Just do your research and best of all, follow your heart. Truly.

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