nursing caps - page 4

I'm in a RN program and it is required for us to wear our caps. We hate it What do you think? Did you have to wear one? and What year was it?... Read More

  1. by   feisty_lpn
    I received my cap in March 2003. From that point forward, we wore our caps to class AND clinicals. I went to a very strict, old-school program. We had to be in full uniform, even in class. We had spot-checks on our uniforms. Once, I didn't have my scissors in my pocket (during CLASS) and was made to leave the school until I had them. I went down the street, bought a new set of scissors and went back to class.

    I could not find the article in the local newspaper for my capping, but here is the link to the last class being capped... http://www.mountvernonnews.com/local...22/nurses.html

    During clinicals, we had to wear those awful white bibs on the front of the shirts.

    I do wear white scrubs when I'm on the floor. I've found that it eliminates the "Where can I find a nurse?" or "Are you a nurse?" questions. Most LPNs I've worked with do the same.
  2. by   brendamyheart
    Quote from muffie
    tg we did not have to in 1984-87
    my hair was about 1 cm long
    how would you attach a cap to that
    crazy glue for crazy hat
    I never wore a cap. Like you, my hair is, well short, about the same as yours. We have to wear white were I work. I want to find a cap to wear, or super glue to my head. Were can I find one???
  3. by   jabiru
    Quote from Otessa
    I can frencH braid my hair AND wash it every day-can you say the same for a CAP???
    We had to use a clean cap each day - starched cloth, not paper. I'm not saying they were essential for reasons of hygiene but the standards today have slipped enormously with nurses wearing their hair every which way.

    I realise I'm in the minority here, but I think hair trailing down a nurse's back is very unprofessional.
  4. by   P_RN
    Every now and again I'd drag out one or the other of the ones I have. Sometimes you feel like a nut sometimes a Nurse. I don't rightly know where any of them are now. I do have a cape also. Got it on eBay for $20.
  5. by   htrn
    I like the nostalgia of nursing caps. I don't like the fact that nurses, CNAs, docs, and housekeeping all wear the same thing and cannot be distinguished from one another except by their name tags.

    That being said, hats are an infection control issue and just get in the way. I would also like someone to explain to me the rationale and history of putting women, primarily of childbearing age, in white.

    Can you tell, I still am in love with the doc that did my hysterectomy.:spin:
  6. by   niccikatie
    I did my first clinicals at that facility (I'm pretty sure it's the same one!)

    Quote from indigo girl
    I worked thru an agency at a facility in RI, which shall remain nameless.
    I was scheduled for night shift, and went over to check the place out the day before I was scheduled.

    My first thought was that I had accidently walked into a movie set.
    My second thought was that I had somehow lapsed into the Twilight Zone.
    My third was that it was a costume party.

    Nope. None of those. It was privately owned, and the owner insisted that its nurses, and med techs wear caps and white uniforms, I was told by the white uniformed director of nurses with her starched cap. Believe it. It really happened, and I am sure it continues. I will admit that they sure did look professional!
  7. by   Retired R.N.
    Quote from Otessa
    I can frencH braid my hair AND wash it every day-can you say the same for a CAP???
    Absolutely! Our school cap opened out flat for easy laundering. We dipped them in thick starch and stuck them on mirrors to dry overnight. No ironing was required. The stripes were "glued" on with KY jelly.

    It was no problem at all to have a clean cap every day.
  8. by   all4schwa
    Quote from Retired R.N.
    The stripes were "glued" on with KY jelly.
    we did this for the caps we used at pinning and i thought it was outlandish!
  9. by   ehallie
    I was also required to wear a cap during nursing school as a LVN in the early 70's and as a RN in the early 80's. Once pinning was over, I never put the thing on my head again. Our school did away with cap the next year. The nurses cap was design to replace the veil that was worn in years past. They were worn as a symbol of subservance to the doctors. What other profession do you know of that has such a silly and demeaning requirment. In the early 70's we were also taught not to sit in the presence of a doctor in the nurses' station. We all had to stand up as long as they were present. We were treated like a servant by most doctors in those day and given very little credit for our knowledge. I for one am glad that time have changed and we are treated with more equality in our scrubs that we ever were in our white starched uniform and cap.
  10. by   JenNJFLCA
    We didn't even get caps in nursing school...not even at our pinning ceremony! I do have my grandmother's now, though.
  11. by   emmycRN
    Quote from ehallie
    I was also required to wear a cap during nursing school as a LVN in the early 70's and as a RN in the early 80's. Once pinning was over, I never put the thing on my head again. Our school did away with cap the next year. The nurses cap was design to replace the veil that was worn in years past. They were worn as a symbol of subservance to the doctors. What other profession do you know of that has such a silly and demeaning requirment. In the early 70's we were also taught not to sit in the presence of a doctor in the nurses' station. We all had to stand up as long as they were present. We were treated like a servant by most doctors in those day and given very little credit for our knowledge. I for one am glad that time have changed and we are treated with more equality in our scrubs that we ever were in our white starched uniform and cap.
    Excellent point!!! Caps and white uniforms-definatey not a symbol of professionalism. Knowledge and initials behind your name-that's the ticket.
  12. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from emmycRN
    Excellent point!!! Caps and white uniforms-definatey not a symbol of professionalism. Knowledge and initials behind your name-that's the ticket.
    You can be an idiot and have a boatload of initials behind your name. Your practice is what makes you a professional (or not).
  13. by   rach_nc_03
    I graduated in 2005 and we had to wear our caps for all clinicals except peds (scared the kids) and burn unit (infection risk) until the middle of our final semester, when the program director suddenly decided to drop the requirement (director was a guy). I refused to go to our graduation because wearing the cap was required, and I thought it was so silly that we were forced to do it all along.

    This director, btw, also said that, if he had his way, we'd all wear dresses, white stockings, and the old-fashioned shoes. I thought the handful of men in our class would look pretty funny in that getup.

    I know some people thing it makes one look professional, but I firmly believe it's a symbol of subservience- and related to the caps maids wore- hearkening back to the days when nurses also did the job of a maid. No thanks.
    Last edit by rach_nc_03 on Nov 6, '06

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