Nurses with Adult ADD - page 4

Hi all, As a prospective Nursing Student I am curious if there is anybody out there with Adult ADD (Adult Attention Deficit Disorder). I was diagnosed with ADD as a child and have also been... Read More

  1. by   Rhon1991
    Quote from earle58
    even if i didn't want to disclose my add, it's so hard not to when you see so many of your collegues struggling with the same issues. my dtr. was diagnosed when she was 4 yo......she is now 14. but through her diagnostic tests, that is when i wondered if it was a familial trait. i have yet to share my childhood with her in great depth but boy, sometimes i feel i am the prototype for add. so now here's my question to all you adder's: have any or many of you gotten into trouble at work because of your uncontrolled impulses? it's because of an impulse and a hyperfocus situation where now i'm in some trouble at work. because of me focusing on just one aspect of a particular situation (thus, missing the big picture) and then acting on it (impulsively), it has currently created a big problem that ended up being a huge problem. anyway and again, do any of you ever find yourself in hot water at work because of uncontrolled add?
    It does make it hard not to talk about ADD when you see it in other colleagues... I especially couldnt hold back after I first 'discovered' all about it and felt I could 'educate' others... what I found though was a big controversy, way bigger than I could handle (because there are even those in the psych community that dont believe in it). I got tired of debating it and then having to 're-proove' that I was a good nurse... after you have disclosed, have you ever turned and saw them watching you like you are some kind of new species they need to study? LOL... Due to others ignorance, I choose to keep my mouth shut from here on out... unless I find the irresistable need to disclose one on one and the only reason I would- would be if I thought it would help someone else (and only if they are actually asking/wanting help).

    Im glad I didnt know about ADD going through nursing school and then trying to succeed at being an ICU nurse... just dont know how that would have skewed my thinking process regarding when I 'messed up'...

    Just curious, how do they diagnose ADD in a 4yo? I thought it would be difficult at they age since they have short attention spans anyway, ect and really couldnt have a definitive dx until the school years when they are in a structured setting...

    Have I gotten in trouble at work? hmmm... I dont know... could it be my first year as a nurse (12 yrs ago) when they told me I wasnt 'efficient' because I chose to spend too much time in the am rounds with lady with bp 80's and lethargic when i had 7 other pts to see? YOU BETCHA... no, after that little 'supervisor to new nurse' convo they told me I had an attitude and couldnt take contructive criticism...

    or could it be when I didnt suck up to the unit clerk (that everyone else did because they were intimidated by her) and she ended up yelling at me then ultimately threatening me?

    I have been told that I 'obsessed' about some small things. For example, in CVICU, the hourly urine outputs? I like to raise the catheter up and down until all urine out. That drove my preceptor crazy. But she was also known to smack the resident's hand for the same thing... Even tho it bugged her, I really couldnt help myself... found myself looking to see if she was watching... lol. But yea, I get hyperfocused on a pt with a vent/swan who needs blood, ect and sometimes forgot to turn my other pt... I was actually told that I couldnt work in a paticular small hosp icu because 'when I got busy, routine nursing care wasnt done'. I made her specify what and made her write in my eval TURNS. I know they are important but when you are trying to get your system and speed back (after being off 3 years!), some things may fall to the wayside. (I get pulled to this ICU all the time and they like having me there as casual, but not good enough for PT position? go figure)

    Dont know what your paticular situation was, but my advice to any nurse would be to listen to criticism with an open mind, defenses down but if the criticisms are not what you agree with, then say so. There are just too many out there who would rather knock you down than help you up. So keep your chin up no matter what and keep doing your best. We all make mistakes one time or another...
  2. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from Rhon1991
    It does make it hard not to talk about ADD when you see it in other colleagues... I especially couldnt hold back after I first 'discovered' all about it and felt I could 'educate' others... what I found though was a big controversy, way bigger than I could handle (because there are even those in the psych community that dont believe in it). I got tired of debating it and then having to 're-proove' that I was a good nurse... after you have disclosed, have you ever turned and saw them watching you like you are some kind of new species they need to study? LOL... Due to others ignorance, I choose to keep my mouth shut from here on out... unless I find the irresistable need to disclose one on one and the only reason I would- would be if I thought it would help someone else (and only if they are actually asking/wanting help).

    Im glad I didnt know about ADD going through nursing school and then trying to succeed at being an ICU nurse... just dont know how that would have skewed my thinking process regarding when I 'messed up'...

    Just curious, how do they diagnose ADD in a 4yo? I thought it would be difficult at they age since they have short attention spans anyway, ect and really couldnt have a definitive dx until the school years when they are in a structured setting...

    Have I gotten in trouble at work? hmmm... I dont know... could it be my first year as a nurse (12 yrs ago) when they told me I wasnt 'efficient' because I chose to spend too much time in the am rounds with lady with bp 80's and lethargic when i had 7 other pts to see? YOU BETCHA... no, after that little 'supervisor to new nurse' convo they told me I had an attitude and couldnt take contructive criticism...

    or could it be when I didnt suck up to the unit clerk (that everyone else did because they were intimidated by her) and she ended up yelling at me then ultimately threatening me?

    I have been told that I 'obsessed' about some small things. For example, in CVICU, the hourly urine outputs? I like to raise the catheter up and down until all urine out. That drove my preceptor crazy. But she was also known to smack the resident's hand for the same thing... Even tho it bugged her, I really couldnt help myself... found myself looking to see if she was watching... lol. But yea, I get hyperfocused on a pt with a vent/swan who needs blood, ect and sometimes forgot to turn my other pt... I was actually told that I couldnt work in a paticular small hosp icu because 'when I got busy, routine nursing care wasnt done'. I made her specify what and made her write in my eval TURNS. I know they are important but when you are trying to get your system and speed back (after being off 3 years!), some things may fall to the wayside. (I get pulled to this ICU all the time and they like having me there as casual, but not good enough for PT position? go figure)

    Dont know what your paticular situation was, but my advice to any nurse would be to listen to criticism with an open mind, defenses down but if the criticisms are not what you agree with, then say so. There are just too many out there who would rather knock you down than help you up. So keep your chin up no matter what and keep doing your best. We all make mistakes one time or another...
    boy, what a great response. it was my dtr's kindegarten teacher that recommended she be eval'd. a team of pedi specialists did a number of tests, one of them being an eeg which did show synaptic and motor deficits. living in boston, i had access to the creme de la creme. i never disclosed my add to anyone at work, but a couple of coworkers would 'tease' me about my add, as now i am affectionately known as a brilliant airhead. my biggest problem at work is my big mouth...i impulsively (and self-righteously) address issues re: my patients and have defied my don, mds, if my pts. weren't getting what they needed. i am very politically incorrect. so pertaining to add characteristics, my impulsivities get me in much trouble. thank you for responding.
  3. by   Rhon1991
    Quote from sherichance
    I was wondering if someone could answer this for me. If you are diagnosed with ADD as an adult, what treatment options do they give you? I have looked at these other posts about this and feel relieved. For many years I have wondered what was wrong with me and then I seen a commercial on TV for adult ADD. I did some research and it all sounds like me.
    I have gone to the doctor a few times and tried to get into talking about it but then I feel kind of embarassed. I know I shouldnt be but I cannot help it.

    Can anyone tell me the treatment options and whom I should go to and discuss this with? My primary doctor or someone in counseling...........

    I would appreciate the help.
    Although I have heard that the meds they prescribe have helped many deal with the ADHD symtoms, I have to say, that I have been there, done that and I wished I had never tried them. I took them about 2 years -the first year I was in grad school then trying to get off them the next year. Its a long story but although they helped me initially, it was a downhill spiral for me.
    So I have been off them 4years now and just keep my coffee coming... But I also know that everyone with ADD is different and have different degrees of it, so you have to make the right choice for you.
  4. by   Rhon1991
    Quote from earle58
    i never disclosed my add to anyone at work, but a couple of coworkers would 'tease' me about my add, as now i am affectionately known as a brilliant airhead. my biggest problem at work is my big mouth...i impulsively (and self-righteously) address issues re: my patients and have defied my don, mds, if my pts. weren't getting what they needed. i am very politically incorrect. so pertaining to add characteristics, my impulsivities get me in much trouble. thank you for responding.
    Well, thats why the ADDer's are called the 'shakers and the makers' of the world... lol I am sure you are an asset to your unit and very fun to work with. That is, when we are not grouchy... right? lol My perfectionism used to make me grouchy... but now I am a little more realistic.

    I think there should be more nurses like you, actually. We are supposed to be advocates for our pts. Sometimes, who else is going to?
  5. by   dianah
    Rhon1991, Dr. Daniel Amen (www.amenclinic.com) has identified at least 6 different types of ADD, all responding to DIFFERENT treatments/meds. He has found that meds for one type absolutely DO NOT work for another type, in fact they exacerbate the symptoms. His books are fascinating - look 'em up on Amazon or Barnes. If nothing else, they educate and give ADDers hope, IMO. Website is helpful too. While I can't afford the PET scan for my son (which is what he uses to help identify the types and severity of ADD), Dr. Amen's books have been a great help to me just in being informed about my son's ADD. It's encouraging to know someone is STILL working on better diagnosis/treatments.

    Best to you -- D
  6. by   Rhon1991
    Quote from dianah
    Rhon1991, Dr. Daniel Amen (www.amenclinic.com) has identified at least 6 different types of ADD, all responding to DIFFERENT treatments/meds. He has found that meds for one type absolutely DO NOT work for another type, in fact they exacerbate the symptoms. His books are fascinating - look 'em up on Amazon or Barnes. If nothing else, they educate and give ADDers hope, IMO. Website is helpful too. While I can't afford the PET scan for my son (which is what he uses to help identify the types and severity of ADD), Dr. Amen's books have been a great help to me just in being informed about my son's ADD. It's encouraging to know someone is STILL working on better diagnosis/treatments.

    Best to you -- D
    Thanks! It looks like great info and would love to go to one of his appearances. I couldnt find the info on the 6 different types though, could you give me some direction there? I found the forum where they are asking about a couple of diff types.
  7. by   dianah
    The six types are outlined in his book, "Healing ADD." (I paraphrase below)
    "Classic - inattentive, distractible, disorganized, hyperactive, restless, impulsive.
    Inattentive - inattentive, sluggish, slow-moving, have low motivation and are often described as space cadets, daydreamers or couch potatoes.
    Overfocused - have trouble shifting attention, frequently get stuck in loops of negative thoughts or behaviors, are obesessive, worry excessively, are inflexible; frequently behave oppositionally and argumentatively.
    Temporal Lobe - inattentive, irritable, aggressive, have dark thoughts, mood instability, and are severely impulsive.
    Limbic - inattentive, experience chronic low-grade depression are negative (e.g., "glass half empty syndrome"), have low energy and have frequent feelings of hopelessness and worthlessness.
    "Ring of Fire" - inattentive, extremely distractible, angry, irritable, overly sensitive to the environment, hyperverbal, extremely oppositional, and experience cyclic moodiness."
    He also has a chapter on Head-trauma-induced ADD. In the book are lots of tips and info for people dealing with ADDers, not just parents: teachers, vice principals, social workers, policemen, parole officers, marital therapists, psychologists, physicians, attorneys and "even IRS agents," saying "many people with ADD have societal problems and [our] program can teach you how to work with them."
    I read this book a few years ago when I was first becoming familiar with ADD. I see it's time to re-read it, as I've been looking through it and getting interest piqued, ESPECIALLY since my ADDer is now a teen. Can we say rollercoaster ride!!!!????
    I've given just a brief thumbnail, from the book's first chapter. Hope this has been helpful! ---- D
  8. by   Rhon1991
    Dianah,
    Thanks for the info on the 6 types. I hadnt heard of them before. Ive heard of the 3 in the DSM IV with them being the primarily hyperactive, primarily inattentive and cant recall the third.

    I know you gave a brief description of the types however it would be interesting to see the positive aspects of those types as well. Does he go into that in his book? I will have to look at it next time I go to Borders.
    Thanks again!
  9. by   dianah
    You're welcome; I wasn't sure just how much of the six you wanted. There is just SOOOO much info in the book: each chapter dealing with the specific type of ADD reviews brain anatomy and function, the SPECT scan findings, as well as presenting several real cases. Later in the book he presents more in detail how the six are treated -- not just which meds but a "brain enhancement program for optimizing brain function and overcoming ADD barriers that [is used] at the Amen Clinic." Also included is a list of "knowledgeable physicians and therapists, along with strategies to find competent clinicians."
    I hadn't intended this to be an ad for the book but merely another resource we who are involved in ADD (self, child, spouse, whatever) may use. PM me whenever you like; I'm no expert, merely a pilgrim on a similar journey.
    BTW, caveat here: Dr. Amen's work, not surprisingly, is not wholly embraced by the mainstream medical community.
    Good luck finding what works for YOU. -- D
  10. by   fluffybear
    I looked at that site you mentioned, and took the "test" and boy, it did actually seem to describe the mental issues that I seem to have had to continuously deal with throughout my life. However, lately, since starting on Ritalin, I have seemed to be experiencing some depression that is a lot worse than I have ever experienced before. I am currently on Wellbutrin, but it doesn't seem to be working. I would really like to know if anyone else has experienced this when starting a medication and what they did.
  11. by   tiliimnrn
    I originally brought my daughter in to the doctor's to have her diagnosed because I was so sure she had ADD. While I was listening to some of the questions I was thinking to myself. OMG (oh my God) this is me......this is me.
    I'm 54 years old and all of my life I have felt a little behind. I figured it was because I started school when I was 4 and everyone else was older, but as the years went by and I ended up being the oldest in the group I still felt a little behind.

    My way of dealing with the scattering of thoughts, etc. is to get almost hyper organized...you know, make up my own sheets to work from, carry everything in the world you would ever need for a day at work. This works for me, except if there is an emergency, then I get scattered again and panic. I got off of the Tele/step down unit, and the oncology unit, it just wasn't good for me.

    I'm beginning to wonder if having ADD is a prerequisite for nursing? What do you think people
  12. by   tslane
    Hi. I have experienced so many of the problems you have named. Great in some classes, very, very bright but do poorly or fail other classes because I am too overwhelmed and can't deal with the stress. It is difficult to make friends and keep them. I just don't seem to have the time to devote to friendships. Tried college in my mid twenties, felt overwhelmed and did just like you - took a job that was not challenging. I was tested for a learning disability in 1990 when I wanted to go back to college. I have one. But I never considered adult add until a Nurse that I work with told me she had add and showed me a website with a whole list of symptoms of adult add. And it was ME!

    I have been accepted into a RN program for this fall. But I am worried. In the past, if I did poorly in a class, I could just drop it and take it again. But in Nursing school, you can't do that. I have a very difficult time focusing on technical info.

    So I mada an appointment with a Psychologist and I do have adult add. He is going to do more testing next week to decide what kind of meds to try me on first.

    QUOTE=echo*echo]Hi all,

    As a prospective Nursing Student I am curious if there is anybody out there with Adult ADD (Adult Attention Deficit Disorder). I was diagnosed with ADD as a child and have also been treated for this (and depression) as an adult. I was also diagnosed with severe migraines at age 6 and continue to suffer from them 30+ years later. As a child I was very much withdrawn from my classmates and often became innattentive or lost in my own world. This was attributed to ADD despite the fact I was performing 2-3 grade levels above my peers.

    Grades 1-12 were not very difficult for me despite many lapses, however once I reached college I soon became overwhelmed with the workload and working so many hours. I would do very well one semester, and then reach a point the next semester where I had so much going on that I would literally break down and not be able to stay focused on anything. Needless to say my grades and life suffered because of this.

    I eventually left college and took a rather unchallenging position for 10 years. It had little pressure and I was rarely overwhelmed, at least at work. My doctor even suggested ADD was partially responsible for me "settling" for such a position. However in my private life I still often had difficulty prioritizing and remaining organized. I have taken medication off and on for this and to be honest don't know if it has helped or not.

    Now my question to you: Any other sufferers? How did it impact your schooling? How has it affected your career? Would this even exclude me from getting into an ADN program? I went through a 3 year period of my life where I worked full-time and spent my remaining time caring for a terminally ill Mother and despite the difficulties, physically and emotionally, I handled the situation very well. As tragic as this situation was it did give me confidence that I can handle an intense workload and pressure situations. Maybe maturity has dulled it's affect?

    Thanks![/QUOTE]

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