Nurses week Cheap gifts from admin. - page 9

So, with nurses week coming up, I was fondly remembering all the neat swag my employer has offered me as a token of their appreciation. Over the last four years as a nurse I have received - A... Read More

  1. by   LoriUSAFRN
    As the nurse manager of an Air Force peds clinic, I bought all my nurses a ticket to the steak sale the hospital was having to raise money for nurse/med tech appreciation week at the end of May ( so our hospital does things a little differently!) Not all managers are bad!! Wish I could afford to do more for my staff.

    For the hospital nurse/tech week, a breakfast is planned, a cookout or two and a couple of other activities. Not too shabby for a military med center. Leadership heads up all these activities. Even at my last base, the nurses were all recognized and we had our annual group photo taken. Sorry to hear that nurses out in the civilian sector don't celebrate each other!
  2. by   Stormy
    I can't believe the anger and disdain that has been generated in this post. It seems that nurses are generally feeling undervalued in their work. I agree, there are some managers that are not suited to be managers and don't do a good job, just as there are some staff nurses that aren't worth their salt and shouldn't be nurses.

    Perhaps your manager was wise and decided not to give you unwanted trinkets and patronizing words that you wouldn't want anyway. It seems that most nurses want increased pay, more vacation, more time off from their managers - which, by the way, none of them have the power to give you even if they feel you deserve it. (They don't in a unionized workplace, not sure about those of you who work in a nonunionized environment)

    I understand feeling undervalued because your manager is not understanding of personal or family issues you may be experiencing. I understand feeling undervalued because of various work related issues. I do NOT understand feeling undervalued by your managers because your rate of pay is too low, or you don't get enough time off, or that you don't get enough vacation. Your manager can do nothing about these issues. These are higher level administrative issues, and perhaps you need to become part of a union that can represent you in the bargaining process.

    I also don't understand nurses who talk about "management types" in the context that has been discussed. You find it hurtful that you get silly trinkets. I find it hurtful that some of you lump all managers together - accusing them all of practicing the same behaviors.

    I am responsible for staffing the unit when there are sick calls, or when we need extra staff because of workload. That is my responsibility that I accept. Hearing the attitudes expressed here, it makes me sorry that I cover for you while you went to your son's award ceremony at school today, that I came in and worked 4 hours for you so that you could attend your daughters grade 9 graduation, that I worked a weekend for you so that you could visit with your parents from out of town when my parents were also visiting from out of town. I am sorry that I let you go home early when I come in early. yada yada yada.

    Actually, I am not sorry. I am very grateful to have the staff that I have. My staff are very appreciative of the things I do for them, and tell me on a regular basis. I feel valued as a manager by my staff. I feel valued because I ensure I treat my staff nurses with dignity and respect. Worklife isn't perfect where we are either, but we make an effort to treat each other with dignity and respect.
  3. by   RNforLongTime
    My hospital is attempting to recover from an 8 million dollar defecit right now! I doubt that we are getting a darn thing this year. Crappy thing is is that National Nurses Week is the same week as National Hospital Workers Week. Last year the entire hospital staff received a very nice denim shirt emblazoned with the new hospital logo.

    We may get a few trinkets from the Nursing Ed. dept and from our District Nurses Association like last year we got a pen on a rope and a name badge lanyard.

    We'll see.
  4. by   Jenny P
    I agree with Stormy here; don't lump all nurse managers together.

    Stevierae, I commented about your attacking Klare on the other thread; you sound as though you have issues with bad managers and I feel that you are unfairly attacking a nurse manager (whom I don't know) who sounds as though she is trying to do the best job she can within the confines of her job description.

    I have had a number of good nurse managers; I talked my current one into applying for this position because I worked under her elsewhere and she is a hardworker and fair to her staff. I've worked under another manager not once but twice in separate ICUs who would back up her staff to the point that she was fired a number of times! Each and everyone of her staff would have gone to the ends of the Earth if she asked us to! She is now dead; but those of us that have worked under her will never forget her, nor that there ARE good nurses in management who do support us.

    This thread is on cheap gifts from administration. Please stick to it.
    Last edit by Jenny P on May 6, '02
  5. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    Originally posted by Jenny P
    sounds as though she is trying to do the best job she can within the confines of her job description.
    She very well may be doing the best she can, but I wouldn't know. I quit reading after she called her floor nurses whiners.

    Heather
    Last edit by OBNURSEHEATHER on May 6, '02
  6. by   ageless
    Stormy...you have contradicted yourself many times in your post so that it appears you have ambivalent feeling about your position.
    I, for one, am not sorry that I use my earned vacation time. If I don't use it, I lose it. I am sorry that I tell you why I need time off, because you now use my personal business against me. I am sorry that I feel I have to have a "good enough" reason to ask for my earned time off. If you choose to think of yourself as a martyr or a fairy god-mother who grants me time with my family. It's your business.

    It sounds that you make your staff pay dearly for what you think you give them.
  7. by   Stormy
    Ageless,
    The points I am trying to make is simply these:

    Many of the postings here are doing a wonderful job of slamming all levels of management. That is uncalled for because not everyone in management displays the qualities the postings are describing.

    The general air in these postings is that nurses do not appreciate anything that anyone in management does that is supposed to be meant as an expression of appreciation for their hard work and participation in their units.

    To make a point, I was being sarcastic by saying that I was sorry that I worked shifts for people while they participated in things important to them. I went on to explain that I really was not, and why.

    The example of the nurse attending her son's award ceremony at school today did happen today. The nurse approached me at 1000 to see if she could leave for a few hours in the afternoon. She should have made prior arrangements - but didn't. There was no replacement on short notice. I covered for her so she could go. It is not my role to work as a staff nurse, but it doesn't hurt me to help out when I can. These things are not being done because I want to be a "martyr". I do it because I appreciate her as a nurse. When you do something nice or work hard do you consider yourself as being a "martyr" or a "fairy god-mother" as well? Or is it only management that is?

    The other examples I quoted also were examples of staff needing time off who could not have it because there were others on vacation already. Aside from the casuals working for those already on vacation, the only option was for me to work for them.

    Once again, I am glad I have the staff that I do. We work well together as a team. We support and respect each other.
  8. by   susanmary
    Stormy -- please refer to my original reply for this post. You make some very intelligent, thoughtful comments. But many staff end up doing manager's jobs for them ... many managers will not fill sick calls ... many of us are left to fend for ourselves with prescheduled holes/then sick calls -- with no float pool or resouces. My manager will NOT take an assignment -- ever. I spent 1 1/2 hour out of my shift on Sunday, as charge/no pay, with a full patient load -- trying to fill 12 hour nurse hole on nights for Sunday -- plus prescheduled holes for Monday for both nurses and aides to fill (that's before an aide called out for Monday.) I don't look/expect token gifts for nurse's week. In fact, I went in bright and early on Monday with a can of great coffee -- and made a pot for staff so when they went in the aroma was wondeful. I ended up bringing in a large box of donut holes ... the PA's made three quiches... the secretary made homemade breads.... Colleagues treat each other very well on my unit . Don't need a nurse's day/week to validate the fact that I'm a GREAT nurs. If the hospital wants to recognize us with a trinket, fine. I'll accept the refrigerator magnet graciously (seriously!) Nursing is not about gifts .... perhaps nursing means a bit more.
    I value what I do .... so do my patients. That's really all I care about.
    Originally posted by Stormy
    I can't believe the anger and disdain that has been generated in this post. It seems that nurses are generally feeling undervalued in their work. I agree, there are some managers that are not suited to be managers and don't do a good job, just as there are some staff nurses that aren't worth their salt and shouldn't be nurses.

    Perhaps your manager was wise and decided not to give you unwanted trinkets and patronizing words that you wouldn't want anyway. It seems that most nurses want increased pay, more vacation, more time off from their managers - which, by the way, none of them have the power to give you even if they feel you deserve it. (They don't in a unionized workplace, not sure about those of you who work in a nonunionized environment)

    I understand feeling undervalued because your manager is not understanding of personal or family issues you may be experiencing. I understand feeling undervalued because of various work related issues. I do NOT understand feeling undervalued by your managers because your rate of pay is too low, or you don't get enough time off, or that you don't get enough vacation. Your manager can do nothing about these issues. These are higher level administrative issues, and perhaps you need to become part of a union that can represent you in the bargaining process.

    I also don't understand nurses who talk about "management types" in the context that has been discussed. You find it hurtful that you get silly trinkets. I find it hurtful that some of you lump all managers together - accusing them all of practicing the same behaviors.

    I am responsible for staffing the unit when there are sick calls, or when we need extra staff because of workload. That is my responsibility that I accept. Hearing the attitudes expressed here, it makes me sorry that I cover for you while you went to your son's award ceremony at school today, that I came in and worked 4 hours for you so that you could attend your daughters grade 9 graduation, that I worked a weekend for you so that you could visit with your parents from out of town when my parents were also visiting from out of town. I am sorry that I let you go home early when I come in early. yada yada yada.

    Actually, I am not sorry. I am very grateful to have the staff that I have. My staff are very appreciative of the things I do for them, and tell me on a regular basis. I feel valued as a manager by my staff. I feel valued because I ensure I treat my staff nurses with dignity and respect. Worklife isn't perfect where we are either, but we make an effort to treat each other with dignity and respect.
  9. by   nightingale
    Sometimes we simply need to talk. Sometimes it is venting; I think the vast majority of us are looking for understanding or hope to find a better way to view our situation. IMHO

    B.
  10. by   mom22
    On Monday, we had makeovers and manicures. Some vendors came and you could get free Avon and other samples.

    Tuesday is vendor day for shopping.

    Wednesday is cultural diversity day, with employees making the presentations.

    Thursday is the ice cream party.

    Friday is 'Professional Day', with continuous 45 minute to one hour CEU presentations, free financial advisors, and Employee Assistance advisors to remind is about our 'back to school' program.

    Interspersed among these things are the usual give-aways such as mugs, pens, calculators, etc.
  11. by   smg
    Wouldn't you rather have the hospitals save the money that they spend on these gifts and use it for raises. I know the money that they set aside is small, but it seems as if nurses do not appreciate the small effort that administration puts in regarding the gifts.
    I would rather have a simple thank you card or a manager that seems truly gratiful then any small gift anyways.
    I would just like to have a lunch break in peace or be able to take a walk with out worrying that we are so understaffed that the critical patients are going to be left alone.
    Gifts are not what is important, it is the fact that we need to be appreciated for what we do on our 8 or 12 hours shifts and usually go at least an hour past that.
  12. by   Q.
    Originally posted by OBNURSEHEATHER


    She very well may be doing the best she can, but I wouldn't know. I quit reading after she called her floor nurses whiners.

    Heather
    Here Here!

    To me, if a manager refers to her staff as "whining", then that tells me she really isn't listening to their concerns and certainly isn't advocating for them either. Just as she stopped listening to her staff, WE quit reading her post after that comment.
  13. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    Today was my first day at work this week. There was a penlight in my mailbox that was passed out yesterday. I broke it trying to turn it on.

    Then we were all given passes for a free sundae, actually a very yummy one from a local ice cream place. Unfortunately, we were so overwhelmed in the nursery with B-Strep babies that someone from housekeeping gathered up all of our passes and went downstairs to get them for us. I ate mine between drawing CBC's.

    Our supervisor? She took a couple of vacation days this week. Nowhere in sight. Looking back, this isn't a bad gift.

    Heather

close