Nurses stopping for an accident scene - topic revisit - page 2

by Nascar nurse 3,620 Views | 14 Comments

This topic has been discussed to death with many different opinions on what to do. After my recent ordeal, I just want to thank those of you that choose to stop. Last night my 17 year old son was involved in a 3 car accident... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from MN-Nurse
    If you happen to follow any of the previous "Stop at an accident threads" you would know there was very, very little chance the ones that stopped were allnurses members.
    I disagree......for I think when nurses are faced with the decision to stop or not to stop.....they actually do stop. I encourage that nurses be careful what they try to do at the scene and looking at Nascar's post these nurses calmed some very scared teenagers.....which is about the extent of what most nurses....even ED/EMS trained nurses can do little at an accident scene without equipment to immobilize.

    Most of the time we roll up on the scene....police are already there.....but when you see something happen it is instinct to call for help and to keep everyone calm.

    Nascar....as the Mommy of a budding driver ....my worse nightmare will be that phone call.....Mrs. Mommy .......this is Your Worst Nightmare Hospital ED.......your daughter has been in an accident....

    I am so happy everything is essentially OK......I wish your son a speedy recovery and God Bless those compassionate nurses who took the time to comfort a scared teen.

    Nascar....it's all going to be OK....
    nursel56, violetgirl, and Nascar nurse like this.
  2. 1
    Quote from Mike A. Fungin RN
    That's the problem. Nurses (unless they're former Fire/EMS/LE or part of a flight program) haven't got the training to be "safe" at an accident scene. You don't know what you don't know, unless you know it. How to stage your vehicle at an accident, how to approach a damaged vehicle, hazards that the vehicle itself presents, etc. I could go on. If you're not a prehospital provider, you have no place at the scene of an accident on a busy roadway. All you are is an additional hazard.
    Having provided care at accident scenes I disagree with your assessment that I was just an additional hazard. At one I was able to stop bleeding from lacerations, perform an initial assessment of who was injured and later report that to EMS, and describe how the accident happened to police when they arrived. The way the vehicles spun after the accident made it difficult for anyone but a witness to know how it occurred.

    It's pretty much standard that states require witnesses to remain at the scene until police arrive. If I must stay anyway I might as well offer help within my level of expertise and scope of practice. Good Samaritan laws are based on the assumption that it's desirable to have people assist at an accident scene whether they are civilians, nurses, doctors, or trained Fire/EMS/LE. Of course, if I stop and someone says they don't want assistance I'll honor their wishes.

    To the OP, I'm sure those nurses know your son appreciated their care. I'm glad they were there to help him.
    Nascar nurse likes this.
  3. 2
    Quote from MN-Nurse
    If you happen to follow any of the previous "Stop at an accident threads" you would know there was very, very little chance the ones that stopped were allnurses members.
    I think that's a pretty unfair over-generalization. In most of those threads the consensus was that beyond the ABC's there is little an RN without additional training can do from a medical treatment POV. I don't recall a majority saying they wouldn't even stop.
    vintagemother and Esme12 like this.
  4. 0
    Quote from FlyingScot
    I think that's a pretty unfair over-generalization. In most of those threads the consensus was that beyond the ABC's there is little an RN without additional training can do from a medical treatment POV. I don't recall a majority saying they wouldn't even stop.
    Kind of a funny way to look at it.

    Maintaining an airway, positioning to allow fore adequate breathing, and stopping a life threatening bleed seem pretty important.
  5. 0
    Quote from hherrn
    Kind of a funny way to look at it.

    Maintaining an airway, positioning to allow fore adequate breathing, and stopping a life threatening bleed seem pretty important.
    And where, pray tell, in my post did I indicate otherwise?


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