Nurses rights

  1. When I was young, I couldn't figure out this. Do we nurses have rights? Seems that all our rights are our duties.
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   jayna
    OH MY GOD!! VALWAI..didn't realize that......but seems more like that..
  4. by   Dyno
    Not sure Val why you don't think you have rights, maybe your working environment doesn't foster them.
    All nurses have rights, as all employees and human beings do..
    Right to ... safe working environment including non-violence, hazardous materials, non-lifting policies, ongoing ed, acceptable staffing levels.
    Right to.. voice opinions and participate in improving safe practice
    Right to .. be treated with respect by colleagues, patients, visitors an in turn it is the nurses duty to respect people they work with, if there is a problem take the appropriate line of communication

    Just a few thoughts from down-under
  5. by   debbyed
    I think I want to come work with you. Hows your job market?

    Besides which I don't think anybody every gets mad at Australia.
  6. by   Mijourney
    Hi, ValWai. You make an excellent point. Nurses have rights, but frequently we are obstructed in some way or another from learning what they are really about or getting good interpretation of our rights. Or, when we learn what they are, we don't exercise them. Nurses exercising our rights in a proper, thoughtful manner along with our duties would make us a very, very powerful group. Thanks for bringing up the topic.
  7. by   nur20
    Another good reason to attend the MILLION NURSE MARCH !!!!!!!!
  8. by   NRSKarenRN
    The ANA has been working on this issue for several years. A Nurses Bill of Rights can be found in Oct. AJN issue and will be posted on website www.nusringworld.org after Nov. 11, 2001.
    I'll post it here when available.

    --------------------------
    Also posting additions to ANA Code of Ethics below:
    http://www.nursingworld.org/ethics/chcode.htm

    The ANA House of Delegates approved these nine provisions of the new Code of Ethics for Nurses at its June 30, 2001 meeting in Washington, DC. In July, 2001, the Congress of Nursing Practice and Economics voted to accept the new language of the interpretive statements resulting in a fully approved revised Code of Ethics for Nurses With Interpretive Statements. For further information, contact Gladys White at the Center of Ethics and Human Rights.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    1. The nurse, in all professional relationships, practices with compassion and respect for the inherent dignity, worth and uniqueness of every individual, unrestricted by considerations of social or economic status, personal attributes, or the nature of health problems.

    2. The nurse's primary commitment is to the patient, whether an individual, family, group, or community.

    3. The nurse promotes, advocates for, and strives to protect the health, safety, and rights of the patient.

    4. The nurse is responsible and accountable for individual nursing practice and determines the appropriate delegation of tasks consistent with the nurse's obligation to provide optimum patient
    care.

    5. The nurse owes the same duties to self as to others, including the responsibility to preserve integrity and safety, to maintain competence, and to continue personal and professional growth.

    6. The nurse participates in establishing, maintaining, and improving healthcare environments and conditions of employment conducive to the provision of quality health care and consistent with the values of the profession through individual and collective action.

    7. The nurse participates in the advancement of the profession through contributions to practice, education, administration, and knowledge development.

    8. The nurse collaborates with other health professionals and the public in promoting community, national, and international efforts to meet health needs.

    9. The profession of nursing, as represented by associations and their members, is responsible for articulating nursing values, for maintaining the integrity of the profession and its practice, and for shaping social policy.


    I bolded areas that pertain to some of nurses rights. Karen
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Oct 20, '01
  9. by   jayna
    NRSKarenRN..... thanks ..that would be great..

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