Nurses rat on nurses - page 2

I have noticed a disturbing trend amoung nurses. I am new to nursing so maybe I am wrong. Nurses seem not to have any loyality to each other. I have seen many nurses sell out, tell on, rat out, or... Read More

  1. by   emily_mom
  2. by   Flynurse
    I can see rscarlatti's point though. I do not condone "covering up" or what have you. However, there is something to be said about a stronger "sisterhood/brotherhood" of nursing.

    As in many posts before we have discussed sticking up for each other and not "eating the young." I can not tell you how many times my friends and myself have been discouraged about nursing because other more experienced nurses were rude. For instance, in my first three months I had to learn very quickly what my role was and I had to deal with it on my own. I didn't get that "year" period in which every nurse told me it took them to "get the hang of it." If I had done that they would have hung me!

    I cannot tell you how many times I went home crying when I had asked for help or stated simply how I felt about my workload in the nursing home when speaking to other nurses. They answer was always, "So what!?!?!" As if being a nurse means you automatically know every policy and proceedure of a facility new to you AND you should know exactly how to deal with any and ALL problems which arise.

    We really should focus on helping each other out, WHICH in turn might lead to reduction of other nurses making mistakes, thus, reducing the amount of "write-ups" we have to waste our time writing out. For instance, during my preceptorship at my new job I overheard some nurses talking about another nurse on night shift. "I can't believe that she could have time to sit there and count the patient's staples after surgery, but she can't hang a new bag of half normal saline that ends at 0715. What a complete idiot! And she does this all of the time. I wish she would get a clue!" I thought to myself, "Why don't you get a clue and help the poor girl get her priorities straight." (It was my understanding the night nurse was a new grad.)

    So, stand tall! Stand proud! And help each other out!
    (You may be thinking its not your job. But isn't it your job to advocate for the patient? Prevent mistakes, help your fellow nurses out!) :angel2:
  3. by   Bundles of Joy
    This is a very sensitive area for me. I would not cross that line. I would rather go to my fellow nurse and correct the problem well before going outside the situation. BE CAREFUL...
  4. by   deespoohbear
    Originally posted by Bundles of Joy
    This is a very sensitive area for me. I would not cross that line. I would rather go to my fellow nurse and correct the problem well before going outside the situation. BE CAREFUL...
    It depends on what the situation is...if I know that a patient is in immediate danger from a nurse's actions I will do what it takes to protect that patient from harm. Of course, then there is the little minor stuff that some people seem to get a real kick out of writing up co-workers. I have to think awhile about examples I know of (having a major headache and brain dead at present). There have been times where I have just approached the nurse and discussed it with her. Thank God, I don't work with very many nurses that I feel are not able to perform patient care safely. I am actually concerned more about a couple of doctors who have some serious problems with the way they practice medicine....they scare the daylights out of me....

    I guess the bottom line is use your common sense. You don't want to get a reputation for ratting about EVERY little thing...that could cause you some problems...
  5. by   jlc
    Nurses need to stick together, when a nurse calls out for help, then help should be given. If you see a nurse sinking then you should step in and help out. Nurses do at times "kill their young". They seem to feel that since it was rough on them when they started out, why care about the new nurses. or for that matter even about their fellow co-workers. This does not say that you should ignor a situation that is harmful to a patient. Patient safety should always come first and formost, but it seems to me that if nurses where more willing to be their for each other in tough situations, there would be less need "to rat on a nurse". JJ
  6. by   Bundles of Joy
    You're right FLYNURSE. Shamful to say, I am one of those nurses that shrugs off the new grads. It is not personal half of the time, it is becase I have a tight schedule to keep in order to be ready to clock out and give report on time.

    I hear your plea, and I'll slow down next time.
  7. by   Flynurse
    Thank you!
  8. by   deespoohbear
    I try really hard not to "eat our young." I know they need encouragement and support to get them through that first year or so. I always encourage them to ask questions and if they are not sure of something to ask. I tell them that even nurses who have worked the floor a long time still ask each other questions about a pt's symptoms, conditions, should I hold this med for this reason and so on. Like I posted earlier, most of the nurses I work with are really a good group and we get along well 95% of the time.
  9. by   mattsmom81
    I believe we all establish our 'lines' we can't cross so far as unsafe coworkers. Generally my policy through the years is to first approach the nurse privately and express my concern. That has USUALLY worked. (I've done this as charge and staff)

    My coworkers get one warning about serious issues potentially dangerous to patients, and I make it clear if I do hear of it again I have no choice but to document...because I have a license and patients to protect. Of course there's a difference between a brand new green nurse's unintentional mistake vs a seasoned nurse's deliberate act and we have to also consider these things.

    As far as cops and firemen's 'code of silence'...well, ya'll don't have professional licenses so you don't understand. A profession polices itself (or should)...it's a hallmark.

    Now granted I see some pizzy games between nurses that I don't approve of, as I try to be upfront and honest. Not all folks do so. I see some guys in my profession who are just as bad as the girls, unfortunately. Oppressed groups of people tend to behave this way. Wish it weren't so.

    But 'if wishes were horses then beggars would ride'. eh?
  10. by   nurseBe
    Patient safety always comes first. If a fellow nurse needs assistance teamwork is imperative. Patient care is improved with teamwork. Help eachother and CYA. I am very pleased with assistance I get from other RN's at my job, but if a patient's safety is jeopordized it needs to be addressed, this is our job.
  11. by   llg
    Yes, we should be supportive of each other. No, we should not "cover up" mistakes and/or unsafe practices. If that is what firefighters do, they are endangering the lives of their co-workers and the public they are supposed to be serving -- and THEY are the ones with the problem.

    llg
  12. by   Stargazer
    As far as firefighters and cops never reporting each other, that's just not true either. My brother, a paramedic, once had to report a colleague when they discovered, cleaning the rig after a call, that the partner had given exactly the wrong med (lido instead of atropine or similar) to a cardiac arrest patient who was still being coded when they left her in the ER. My brother brought it to the guy's attention and told him he needed to call the ER now and let them know the pt. had this drug on board. Partner pretended he was going to make the call but never did, so my brother ended up calling the ER. The ER doc asked rather grimly why the medic who'd actually made the mistake wasn't on the phone, instead of his partner.

    Guy was written up by the ER doc. Can't remember if he was canned, but I know he was at least suspended.

    And just this last week in the news, a Seattle police officer was caught on tape extorting money and drugs from dealers he arrested. Said cop was under investigation in the first place after fellow cops reported their suspicions to Internal Affairs.

    Bottom line, if you're talking about penny-ante crap like "Jane left the pt's room a mess" or "Jane takes too many breaks" or something, then you're absolutely right, there is too much of that and it needs to stop. If you are talking about actually covering up for clinical incompetence/mistakes or criminal behavior like drug diversion, then that is just ********. Protecting the patient/public and the integrity of our own profession should be our first priorities.
  13. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    Originally posted by Stargazer
    Bottom line, if you're talking about penny-ante crap like "Jane left the pt's room a mess" or "Jane takes too many breaks" or something, then you're absolutely right, there is too much of that and it needs to stop. If you are talking about actually covering up for clinical incompetence/mistakes or criminal behavior like drug diversion, then that is just ********. Protecting the patient/public and the integrity of our own profession should be our first priorities.

    Uh huh.... what she said.

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