Nurses not flushing out P.I.C.C. lines - page 2

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  1. by   Roy Fokker
    Quote from earle58
    it sounds like the antagonism is at your facility, i assure you.
    please, get into the habit now, of treating everyone as an individual.
    it will save you much unneeded conflict.
    Good post. I agree

    Trauma-Team : We have trouble with 'labs processing some of our requests'. Sometimes, they just don't collect and process it fast enough that the blood draws become unusable - forcing us to stick the patient again for fresh samples,

    Would it be fair if I labelled lab folks as "incompetent" ?

    I'm sorry there seems to be this conflict at your institution - I can only hope it is resolved soon.
  2. by   Trauma_Team_1
    Quote from Roy Fokker
    Good post. I agree

    Trauma-Team : We have trouble with 'labs processing some of our requests'. Sometimes, they just don't collect and process it fast enough that the blood draws become unusable - forcing us to stick the patient again for fresh samples,

    Would it be fair if I labelled lab folks as "incompetent" ?

    I'm sorry there seems to be this conflict at your institution - I can only hope it is resolved soon.
    I personally walk 15 miles a day inside our facility if you want to give me rollerblades to get up and down 10 floors and a 30,000 dollar raise id be glad to. The lab runs every floor+ER+CDU+REHAB+NERO....you run one.
  3. by   Pheebz777
    Quote from Trauma_Team_1
    Its no secret that the lab and the Rn's dont get along very well ( Im not sure why this is, but there seems to be a mini battle going on all the time between the two)...
    Probably at your facility. From where I work, staff from different departments get along pretty well. Last month we even voted one of our lab phlebotomists as employee of the month. ANyway, creating more friction by blaming other health team members isn't going to solve anything. As what was said, you can report your findings to the proper authorities and work from there.

    Back on topic PICC lines can be clogged for a number of reasons. Believe me a clogged PICC line is the last thing a nurse wants. It will just make us work harder. When I start my duty I make rounds of all my patients, assess them, check out the environment (02 setting, connections, IV rates etc) and flush all IV access ports. This is done at the start of shift. There are even some PICC lines that flush, but you cannot withdraw blood from.

    Bottom line is... you have a job to do. You're there to withdraw blood. Whether or not PICC lines are clogged you still have to do your job.
  4. by   neetnik461
    Trauma Team 1 wrote:

    We have our tricks also, such as if there is a floor that is treating the lab staff particularly bad we just take more time to get up on the floor
    I'm not sure if this is a general response to all the posts or in response to my comment that it sometimes takes 1-2 hours for phelbotomy to show up on the floor. You definitely insinuate here that if it's taking that long then myself and other nurses must be treating the lab bad and deserve to wait.

    Let me clarify . . I'm not trying to "flame the lab". On our floor we do everything we can to get the blood draw before calling phlebotomy. 2-3 people attempt before the call is made . . .because of course we know the lab is busy (and it's going to take some time for them to get to us)!

    Now, I don't doubt that you have run into nurses who are less than cooperative or who may cause you/the lab headache in some way. But the bottom line is, by playing the waiting game the one that is hurt the most is the patient. Yeah, it might feel good to get "even" in some way, and to force that mean nurse (who think she runs the show) to wait and have to apologize, but purposely delaying lab work on ill people is plain professional negligence.

    Be careful . . .nursing student . . . of participating in a game that one day you (and your patients) may very well be on the receiving end of
  5. by   Roy Fokker
    Quote from Trauma_Team_1
    I personally walk 15 miles a day inside our facility if you want to give me rollerblades to get up and down 10 floors and a 30,000 dollar raise id be glad to. The lab runs every floor+ER+CDU+REHAB+NERO....you run one.
    Hi Trauma_Team_1: Perhaps I should have clarrified what I meant by 'collect".

    The samples are sent up to lab 'collection'. From there on, lab folks collect it, process it and send down the report. I'm sorry if my earlier post led you to assume that I don't know what goes on in a lab or what volume a lab deals with.

    There is no need for you to be testy or to take the remark personally - I'm simply trying to make an analogous point that to blame "LAZY nurses" is no different from blaming "LAZY lab staff".

    Neither one is appropriate as it is an overt generalisation.
  6. by   leslie :-D
    trauma,

    i noticed you started another thread about (phlebs) not getting respect from nsg.
    all 3 responses stated this was not a problem where they worked.

    i'm telling you, you're off to a bad start if you insist that nurses treat phlebotomists poorly.
    furthermore your posts are competitive (phlebs all over the hospital, nsg on 1)and even vindictive (make them wait).
    i seriously suggest an adjustment of attitude and i really can't emphasize enough, treat people as the individuals they are. sheesh.

    leslie
  7. by   sweetie2003
    Wow, I work in the lab as a phleb. and processor, while attending nursing school and the nurses on the floors are usually the ones we dont get along with. as far as icu and ccu things are cool. Sometimes I think the nurses are just so overworked they can come across as mean, but as a future nurse I will always appreciate everyone!
  8. by   Roy Fokker
    moderator note:

    all right folks. let's stick to the subject of the thread.
    not the posters concerned.


    thanks,
    roy
    allnurses.com moderator
  9. by   Daytonite
    Quote from trauma_team_1
    its no secret that the lab and the rn's dont get along very well ( im not sure why this is, but there seems to be a mini battle going on all the time between the two). . .im in nursing school right now so im getting a good appreciation on just how little some nurses think of the lab staff.
    what a poor attitude! how can anyone in their right mind think this goes on in all facilities? how narrow-minded and parochial does someone's thinking have to be to assume this goes on all over the country. psychology teaches us that our own perceptions tend to cloud our judgments and if ever there was an example of that, it is demonstrated by the post of this op.

    let me act as a role model for you trauma_team_1 and demonstrate how i think you should solve the problem you pose in your post.

    rather than rant and rave about clotted up picc lines and bad attitudes, why don't you do a very nursing student thing, open a book or surf the web and do some research on picc lines and their complications. you just might find the answers to this problem of why they get clotted up. that would be a very scholarly thing for you to do instead of complaining about it. it would make your instructors proud. then write a post about any remaining questions you have relating to your research.

    http://www.meditheses.com/articles/01-02-a4.htm - long term central venous catheters: issues for care

    http://www.venousaccess.com/types_of_access.htm#picc - please note the section on picc lines and the list of their disadvantages. it states, "because of the small lumen or lumens blood sampling and tpn are discouraged as they may cause occlusion."

    secondly, do a little reading on how to get along with people difficult people. as an rn and future leader, you are going to have to deal with this issue again and again. might as well start learning how to cope with it now. if you are having problems dealing with it while you are in a position that is not that high on the totem pole, how are you going to do when you are in a position of authority? what kind of a leader do you think people will see in you if you cannot get along with others?

    you have got to drop the negativism. you will never learn and advance in a sea of negativity. school should be opening doors and creating a positive energy in and around you. what happened?
  10. by   suzy253
    Quote from Trauma_Team_1
    We have our tricks also, such as if there is a floor that is treating the lab staff particularly bad we just take more time to get up on the floor
    Well, that's a real safe practice. And by doing this you're proving.....????
    More potential harm to the innocent patient. Certainly an attitude and 'trick' that you're going to have to stop.
  11. by   Noryn
    Quote from suzy253
    Well, that's a real safe practice. And by doing this you're proving.....????
    More potential harm to the innocent patient. Certainly an attitude and 'trick' that you're going to have to stop.
    That is the quote from the original poster that I picked upon as well. That is unacceptable and to be honest if you take part in this I would encourage you to please quit nursing school and do another profession. Lab work is invaluable sometimes in diagnosing or catching a major problem before it happens. By using your "tricks" you very well could be putting a patient's well being and life in danger. I doubt that the nursing staff would be so concerned about routine labs so in my mind I take it that you are talking about delaying now and stat labs because you cant get along with the nursing staff?

    Wow just wow, I am speechless, our patient deserve much better than this.
  12. by   Tweety
    Quote from earle58
    in nsg school, i was taught never to assume.
    they didn't teach you that in your phleb course?
    i'm sure some nurses are guilty; not most.
    where i worked, we had to sign off on the iv drugs and all scheduled flushes.
    it was easy to assess when such problems began.

    leslie

    Leslie I was indeed thinking that this phelb is making presumptions. The op only gets called on clogged PICCs, but might not know that there are 10 more working just fine. Did the op do a study that shows nurses don't flush picc's and 90% of them become clogged?

    PICCs do become clogged. I work with a lot of PICCs and maybe 1% of them get clogged where I work, I don't have any hard and fast facts.

    Maybe management and the nurse educator needs to inservice this hospital. During our last competencies we had to be inserviced on, what was new to us, the "start/stop" method of flushing PICCs, and the need to flush with this even though there's a running IV 24/7. PICCs are easy to clogg. One can't make presumptions however.
    Last edit by Tweety on Aug 20, '06
  13. by   Tweety
    To this OP please note that lab and nurses usually get along pretty well in other places. You're place of work sounds disfunctional, so no need for you to generalize that nurses and lab doesn't get along, because it's not true.

    Yeah sometimes there's a scuffle when we need something stat, or somethings been missed, or misplaced. But usually it's a very cordial professional relationship we enjoy.


    Also note that for the most part......in other facilities.........nurses do flush their PICC lines.

    You just work in a bad place.

    Good luck in school.
    Last edit by Tweety on Aug 20, '06

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