Nurses Motivation - page 2

Im wondering and curious how many nurses out there got into nursing out of a religious motivation,in part or in whole? What I mean is this,were you motivated in any way, by the ethic of any of the... Read More

  1. by   donmurray
    Decency and integrity are not the sole preserve of those who profess an organised religious belief, but are a part of humanity itself, and social in origin. Ethics is the practical expression of morality, which also does not require the existence of a higher being. Theist or atheist, an individual's morality is innate, though shaped by their upbringing.
  2. by   Slowone
    I read the posts here over and over and I just do not understand what Christianity has to do with the "suffering"or "complacency" iin ones working conditions.

    I am a relatively new nurse (< 10yr) and an even newer Christian so I was hoping for a bit of insight into the original topic. However I just ended up confused. The topic took a strange twist.

    Regarless of religious background, whether nursing was a"calling" or just all you know how to do.... I hope to never be the kind of nurse that views nursing as a "business". To me it is more than that, yes I have suffered with my patients and I don't think it has damaged me or my spirit in anyway nor has it affected my ability to stand up for what is right or to fight for the profession.
    The issue being discussed here is not religion, it's now just misguided anger, what are you mad at?
    And why can't a nurse acknowledge a problem and STILL hop around looking for utopia? Works for some.......just not all.
    To go back to the original thread topic..
    Someone told me once that "all nurses go to Heaven", I thought it might help my chances!. Thats how religion fit into my career choice.
  3. by   ohbet
    I agree that "decency and integrity are not the sole preserve of those who profess" a religious belief. There are atheist who are sometimes more ethical than religious believers.

    What relgion does provide is a unconditional bases for ethics. Relgion provides a basis for why I should be honest,even in circumstances where being honest would be to my disadvantage and I would suffer for it..
  4. by   RNKitty
    I have told managers when I interview "My family is my first priority. I work to feed my family, and wouldn't work if I didn't have a need. However, I am a L&D nurse because I LOVE what I do."

    I research the hospitals I apply to very carefully and select my jobs with care and consideration of wage and staffing ratios. I have left two jobs for inadequate staffing and poor work environment/moral, and will never place myself in that situation again.

    Face it - there is a nursing shortage, which means we have leverage in where we work and the conditions under which we work. We have no need to put up with crappy conditions, and we should make that known to management.
  5. by   donmurray
    ohbet, as I said, being moral is a social construct, and does not require a religious belief. That said, all religions provide a moral code to which the adherents should aspire
  6. by   hoolahan
    Ohbet, I found this quote in the paper today, and it pretty much sums up how I feel. I am not sure whether it is a social, moral, ethical, or religious remark, and I don't care, I can only say it spoke to me, and pretty much sums up how I feel about my "call" to nursing...

    "Part of one's human character involves giving something of yourself and your material well-being away for the sake of helping others, and in doing that you become blessed."

    All I can say is I do feel very blessed. This remark was made by a Luteran pastor who was speaking about volunteers who help teach underprivileged children at a summer camp. Saying yes the kids get something, but the volunteers are touched by then children as well.
  7. by   CareerRN
    Originally posted by hoolahan
    Ohbet, I found this quote in the paper today, and it pretty much sums up how I feel. I am not sure whether it is a social, moral, ethical, or religious remark, and I don't care, I can only say it spoke to me, and pretty much sums up how I feel about my "call" to nursing...

    "Part of one's human character involves giving something of yourself and your material well-being away for the sake of helping others, and in doing that you become blessed."

    All I can say is I do feel very blessed. This remark was made by a Luteran pastor who was speaking about volunteers who help teach underprivileged children at a summer camp. Saying yes the kids get something, but the volunteers are touched by then children as well.


    Hoolahan. Please note the word volunteers in the statement used by the Lutheran pastor.

    So again I ask you to show us all how much you are really committed to your "calling". In other words, put your money where your mouth is.

    Here are a couple of sites where you can find many places to practice what you preach 40 or more hours a weeks for free. If you do not like any of these, then I am sure you can tell the place you are receiving a paycheck at right now that you want to work for them for free. I am sure they will not have a problem with that. You will be able to start "giving something of yourself and your material well-being away for the sake of helping others" beginning tomorrow.

    http://www.wecaremedicalmall.org/nat...ee_cliincs.htm

    http://dmoz.org/Society/Religion_and...ical_Missions/

  8. by   Mags
    I have to agree with Don

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