Nurses grossed out by spit/mucus - page 6

I'm starting this thread in hopes that I will read of some techniques to help me overcome my aversion to mucus. I can deal with foul BMs, emptying JPs and NG tube containers, draining clotty... Read More

  1. by   needdynurse
    Quote from farkinott
    of course the worst thing about receiving a lung transplant is bringing up somebody else's sputum!
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    darlene: i am proud of you because suctioning comes with the elegant practice of being a nurse,it comes with the territory and you are on the right
    track(or is that trach)n*b if your patient is being ventilated the pressure guage is one of your best friends as to if you need to suction or not, the high pressure alarm will go off as secretions build. good job nurse------nrsdug
  2. by   needdynurse
    Quote from Teacher Sue
    How can you tell a nurse from a respiratory therapist?
    Stand them both in stool up to their chests, and throw sputum at them. The one that ducks is the nurse.
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    Good one make sure You wipe the phleghm from the ceiling at the end of every shift----or let the R.T do it in return for the stool scene.---NRSDUG/RT
  3. by   needdynurse
    Quote from InTheBlood
    This is an interesting topic. You know I conducted a little informal poll in my unit, and I'm not sure of the reliability. It seems that females GENERALLY dislike sputum/suctioning/etc. more than males and that males GENERALLY dislike cleaning s..t more than females do. Just an interesting tidbit from within my unit. Nothing really bothers me anymore. I'm famous for saying, "I would wipe someone's *** with one hand while eating a sandwich with the other".
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    Good one :chuckle I think it's true and I think that few men change diapers.

    Peanut butter sandwich? ALL RIGHT.------NRSDUG/RT
  4. by   needdynurse
    Quote from mattsmom81
    What gets me is the patients who deliberately wait til you are within the line of fire and let you have it...from flatus to sputum/vomit/blood, etc you name it.

    What is even WORSE is healthcare workers who withold info about infections like Hep B,C, 'suspected' TB and HIV so coworkers can't use that little extra bit of caution when the body fluids start flying through the air.

    And please...don't anybody give me the line about 'we are supposed to treat everybody like they're infectious blah blah'. We do NOT routinely go into every room fully garbed for infectious flying-through-the-air body fluids, it isn't practical, nor do we have the time and resources...we are selective. We all deserve the opportunity to make an informed decision about how much PPE we use. It's to the point out there where I suspect passive aggression is behind withholding of such vital information from other healthcare workers....unforgiveable IMO and if I had my way it would be prosecutable. This from someone who was exposed in this way...ordered by a charge nurse to go and troubleshoot a patient without being informed of what he already KNEW and to be careful. I walked right into it, assuming another RN woud NOT send me in unprotected.. Boy was I stupid, eh?. (no I no longer work there and yes this is fully documented in case I convert)
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    THAT WAS AN AWFUL THING THAT THE CHARGE nURSE DIDN'T WARN YOU.
    WHAT IF YOU HAD GOT SERIOUSLY SICK OR EVEN DIED FROM H.I.V AIDS.
    ALWAYS ASK ABOUT THE PATIENTS ISOLATION STATUS,IF ANTIBIOTIC IV
    IS HANGING --WHY? LOOK GOOD AND HARD AT THE PATIENT --DON'T RELY TOTALY ON MONITORS,RATHER USE YOUR OWN INSTINCT AND DON'T TAKE A CHANCE IF YOUR MIND SAYS NO.GOWN,GLOVE AND MASK -NRSDUG
  5. by   needdynurse
    Quote from farkinott
    of course the worst thing about receiving a lung transplant is bringing up somebody else's sputum!
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    sorry jeff but you are way out of line on this flipant answer.
    suctioning etc. is a mental state that can't be fixed by saying that there are
    worse things than that----we know that---- it dosn't make suctioning easier ,knowing that someone is starving to death,lets deal with the issue at hand,not agrivate it lets help each other.this is caled team nursing-- :uhoh21: nrsdug
  6. by   needdynurse
    [QUOTE=kiyasmom]Thank you, Jesus, thought it was only me. I CAN NOT STAND mucous. My goodness, just typing about it makes me want to gag. My husband has had this bad cough for a while now, complete with green phlegm. He spits it in empty 20 oz. soda bottles if they are handy (which they always are in this house, since I am hopelessly addicted to Pepsi) he spits on the sidewalk as we are walking to the car to take our kids to church or daycare. I hear him bringing it up in the bathroom, and the splash of it hitting the bowl water, and I want to throw up! So gross on so many levels. My nursing school peers laugh at me all the time, and make suctioning noises when I come around ever since our instructor told us that most likely we will be doing trach care at our first clinical. What am I going to do?
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    YOUR HUSBAND IS BREAKING THE LAW: SPITING ON THE SIDEWALK IS AN OFFENCE,WITH IMPRISONMENT IN SOME COUNTRIES. If the sputum that he is spitting is clear or white bubbly he can swalow it..........
    If you have a patient in the hospital who has pneumonia for instance,simply
    give her him a box of tissues and a very large bag and TELL him to quietly spit into the tissue and place it in the bag.As for fellow workers mitreating you
    pray for their ignorance. because the scriptures are right on.Ask for deliverance from their behavior and have some compassion towards you.
    THEY HAVE THEIR WEAK SPOT TOO.keep the peace that passes all undestanding--God Bless---NRSDUG. I WIL PRAY FOR YOU ALSO!!!!!!! :angryfire
  7. by   needdynurse
    Quote from P_RN
    OK I'll do your mucus, flaky skin, tobacco and dentures.
    Oh and fractures (22yr in ortho)

    BUT you have to do my eyeballs, toenails and baby circs. Deal?
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    I use to help opthamologists remove eyes ,for transplant,I got use to it.

    Circumcision? hand the doctor the instruments then look away.

    Toenails ?????????????????? never did it.

    Flaky skin is poor nursing sepsis,what are they thinking?

    Dentures. place in several tissues put in sink turn H2O ON HARDfor a while
    go backto sink with several more tissues,hide the teeth part in tissue,rinse
    residue if any, for tough spots--suck it up and do it Nurse----NRSDUG
  8. by   needdynurse
    Quote from LisaG21
    My mom had a double lung transplant lol we never thought about that haha :chuckle
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    What pray tell is funny about the poor womans misery??? NRSUG :imbar
  9. by   Priti
    Quote from DG5
    Gosh its nice to know there are others in the same boat. I can't handle mucus at all. In nursing school (way WAY back!) we had spatoons at every bedside that we had to empty and clean and I still have nightmares about that. I also worked in an ENT unit and actually doing the suctioning didn't bother me either - but watching it was gross! Weird!! I've secretly thought that was just me! I don't think there is anything out there to help you deal with it. I hold the kidney dish, basin or whatever for them and pretend I am looking but I have to look up or sideways or something. The sound of it freaks me out too. I also can't swallow my own spit for a while afterwards. What to do???
    thank god 'cause i sometimes felt like i did not have what it takes to be a nurse.

    i hate musus bad smelling bm and my worst fear is inserting NG tubes. i have this problem where i vomit if i see or smell someone else's. so as you said there's no way of dealing with it just look away. oh and my colleagues know of my problem so to avoid embarassment they usually deal with vomitus, thanks to them.
  10. by   needdynurse
    Quote from sherms
    thank god 'cause i sometimes felt like i did not have what it takes to be a nurse.

    i hate musus bad smelling bm and my worst fear is inserting NG tubes. i have this problem where i vomit if i see or smell someone else's. so as you said there's no way of dealing with it just look away. oh and my colleagues know of my problem so to avoid embarassment they usually deal with vomitus, thanks to them.
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    This is fine,sounds like you work as a team,just as it should be.
    Let me propose a question--What if you were sent to another unit for a day and these issues presented themselves to you,what would you do?????
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    Just something to chew on.Second question -Why did you become a Nurse
    when these things bother you.What did you do as a student,when these
    things arose,and they would?---NRSDUG
  11. by   needdynurse
    Quote from lisadlpn2brn
    Whew I am in the same boat....I'm getting nauseated thinking about it.:stone
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    Dear Nurse: Check the color of that frothy gurgling stuff --sounds like it may be Pulmonary edema!!!! the charge nurse should know and said nurse should inform attending Doctor.A hint from an R.T at the start of shift ,place a couple of alcohol swabs into colection jar, the alcohol with break the surface tension of bubbles.This will prevent an over fill,and will make contents look a
    whole lot less,and contents will pour easier-----NRSDUG/ :uhoh21: R.T
  12. by   needdynurse
    Quote from DG5
    Gosh its nice to know there are others in the same boat. I can't handle mucus at all. In nursing school (way WAY back!) we had spatoons at every bedside that we had to empty and clean and I still have nightmares about that. I also worked in an ENT unit and actually doing the suctioning didn't bother me either - but watching it was gross! Weird!! I've secretly thought that was just me! I don't think there is anything out there to help you deal with it. I hold the kidney dish, basin or whatever for them and pretend I am looking but I have to look up or sideways or something. The sound of it freaks me out too. I also can't swallow my own spit for a while afterwards. What to do???
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    I remember those old spatoons c cardboard inside and a little sawdust?
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    I don't have to tell you the importance of checking pt phlegm,color white=O.K
    color yellow.=COULD be as a result of an infection process in the lungs.
    color green=definite infection,check temp and w.b.c.someone should be told
    of the combination of facts--(just glance) NRSDUG/RT
  13. by   Philo
    Quote from rnmi2004
    I'm starting this thread in hopes that I will read of some techniques to help me overcome my aversion to mucus. I can deal with foul BMs, emptying JPs and NG tube containers, draining clotty purulent foley bags, etc. but I have the darndest time keeping my cookies when it comes to snot! I was once helping a bilat AKA wipe his behind after the most awful case of smelly taffy doo-doo and had no problem until he asked me to dab at the clear snot dripping from his nose. I almost puked while doing so. What is wrong with me?

    The usual Vicks/peppermint oil/other scent under the nose won't work here, because mucus (usually!) has no odor.

    The last two semesters of clinical rotations, I have specifically asked to be assigned to a trach client just so I can force myself to have to deal with this. Unfortunately (or fortunately?) there have been no patients suitable for me at the facilities I've been at. I am approaching my last semester starting the end of August, and then hopefully I will be off to med-surg. I know at some point I am going to have to deal with this.

    Is there hope for me? Does anyone have ANY suggestions?
    We all have our Achilles heel mine is vomit. Seeing it, hearing it, or smelling it prompts me to vomit; and I like to work med-surg where there's lots of it. But I manage to hold it until I leave the room then I loose it. I can handle spurting blood and maggots in wounds but vomit no way.
    I don't know what to tell you to do other than you have to do yur job and thats part of. Just try not to let the patient see how grossed out you are because for them that would be psychologically distressing and they are already sick.

    Best of luck hope you can maintain your composure until you leave the room.:stone :imbar

    Peace, Love, and Harmony
    Philo
    Last edit by Philo on Aug 3, '04

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