Nurses: Delighted or Annoyed by Nursing Students? - page 7

In the hospitals where I have done clinicals thus far, I feel like some of the nurses hate the nursing students and others are delighted to see the students. I was wondering what the general... Read More

  1. by   Emma123
    I have to say that I had the BEST clinical last week.
    One hint that has helped for me is saying when getting report, "and if there is anything at all that I could do to help you out, please let me know".

    But here's something I thought was funny:




  2. by   menolly_33
    I was a teacher for 9 years before becoming a nurse, I loved teaching, but wanted to be a nurse also so I went for it. As I miss teaching a lot, I really love having students. Also love precepting people new to the unit.
  3. by   SinfulCNA27
    for the most part...the nurses during my clinicals (this is the 2nd week) have been great. they help when they can and one actually came and got me and 2 other students to show us some wound care. the only person who hasnt been as helpful is a few of the cna's! i was surprised! one of them were really snotty to us. :uhoh21: i dont know why...maybe they dont like students either!!! i know i'm just going to shut my mouth...keep my comments to myself and try to keep my nose clean. i do not want to be on this woman's bad side...lol

    sinn
  4. by   kadokin
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    We have 3 local BSN programs in this area, and soon as i read this, it reminded me of one of them. I remember quite a few saying things like "Um, eyeew, like, i'm not touching a bedpan, that's like so gross." Course it didn't help when their instructor is telling them "When you're a nurse, you don't have to do these things, you'll have CNAs."
    I am a BSN and no instructor ever told me I would have a CNA to "do these things". I heard from a few associate degree nurses, though, that they were, personally, "not into bed pans and that kind of thing". What, What, What? It's part of the job, sister(or brother, as the case may be). Every career has certain aspects that are unsavory. If you can't handle handling human waste, Why did you choose nursing as a profession? Don't get me wrong, I know that is not ALL we do, but, really, do you seriously believe that there are that many "desk jockey" jobs to go around, and that you will be qualified for them fresh out of school? Get real, folks.
  5. by   kadokin
    OK, I like teaching nursing students who are eager to learn and spend time w/their pts. I was, however, turned off by one student who called in the night before her clinical and wanted me to give her the data on her pt over the phone. Excuse me, when I was in nursing school, I had to leave my very young children in the care of others to go to the facility and get the data myself. Why should I be expected to find time in my busy day (I was working the floor, for heaven's sake), to do your homework for you. Sorry, I refused and even went so far as to ask her, "Why would I do that?". I almost want to ask the subscribers to this forum if I was wrong, but I know I wasn't. Nevertheless, this student told many of my co-workers(many of whom were not nurses and had no clue) what I did as if I was being a "mean nurse". I don't do my KID'S HOMEWORK for THEM, why would I do it for you? I earned my grades a long time ago, now it's time for you to earn yours. There, I said it and now it is out of my system.!!!
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    There are a lot of students who want others to do their homework for them. I have seen many here try it........

    Fortunately, the majority are excellent and hard workers, in my experience.
  7. by   Q.
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    We have 3 local BSN programs in this area, and soon as i read this, it reminded me of one of them. I remember quite a few saying things like "Um, eyeew, like, i'm not touching a bedpan, that's like so gross." Course it didn't help when their instructor is telling them "When you're a nurse, you don't have to do these things, you'll have CNAs."
    What's so interesting is that where I worked as an educator, our primary feeder schools were technical colleges and ADN programs. In fact, 80% of our nurse staff was ADN prepared.

    What was annoying to ME was that several ADN students thought that emptying bedpans was below them because they were more focused on "advanced" nursing skills, like IVs and trachs and such. They also didn't find value in non-clinical skills, like patient education and counseling. They didn't consider it nursing!

    But luckily, this wasn't the majority of our students, only a handful.
  8. by   Q.
    Quote from kadokin
    OK, I like teaching nursing students who are eager to learn and spend time w/their pts. I was, however, turned off by one student who called in the night before her clinical and wanted me to give her the data on her pt over the phone. Excuse me, when I was in nursing school, I had to leave my very young children in the care of others to go to the facility and get the data myself. Why should I be expected to find time in my busy day (I was working the floor, for heaven's sake), to do your homework for you. Sorry, I refused and even went so far as to ask her, "Why would I do that?". I almost want to ask the subscribers to this forum if I was wrong, but I know I wasn't. Nevertheless, this student told many of my co-workers(many of whom were not nurses and had no clue) what I did as if I was being a "mean nurse". I don't do my KID'S HOMEWORK for THEM, why would I do it for you? I earned my grades a long time ago, now it's time for you to earn yours. There, I said it and now it is out of my system.!!!
    I'm not so sure you were doing her homework for her; it sounds like she just wanted the bare facts, like vitals, etc ~ the homework is her interpretation of, or careplanning around, that data. Her copying down the data whether she's looking at it or getting it over the phone isn't requiring anything other than time and the ability to read and write.

    Who knows why she asked? Perhaps she had a 45-60 minute commute to the hospital just to copy down statistics. Perhaps she couldn't arrive at the hospital at o-dark-hundred to get the data before clinical because of childcare issues. Perhaps she had a dying father.

    Or perhaps she was lazy. At any rate, she was creative and assertive. Good qualities in a nurse-to-be imo.
  9. by   fergus51
    I couldn't imagine calling a nurse to get her to relay the info to me. Nurses are busy with patient care. I wouldn't call that creative or assertive, I'd call it rude and inconsiderate. I had to commute to one of my rotations, so I just came in early in the morning to do my prep work.
  10. by   Q.
    Quote from fergus51
    I couldn't imagine calling a nurse to get her to relay the info to me. Nurses are busy with patient care. I wouldn't call that creative or assertive, I'd call it rude and inconsiderate.
    Nah, it was worth a shot on the part of the student. Depending on how desperate my situation was, I might have attempted the same thing.

    Part of what irks me about education, especially in the medical field, is the whole "pay yer dues" mentality (not saying you have that). What's more important ~ that the student drive to, walk to, or wake up early for the needed information, or gets the needed information, interprets it correctly and provides excellent patient care?

    I'm sure I'm in the minority, but that's okay.
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I am sorry, but I have to agree with fergus totally here.

    I don't think it was at all appropriate for the student to call, and with HIPAA as a consideration, only a fool of a nurse would give such information over the phone. I know I sure would not. And I might have a talk w/the instructor in light of it, depending on the student's performance and behavior the next day. It could be a slip or mistep, but if I saw further problems, I would think it would warrant a chat w/student's instructor.

    Conveying medical information over the phone with people you don't know is not "smart" nor "creative", either. HOW does anyone KNOW this person is legit? Did no one among the student's pofessors/instructors discuss HIPAA with this student?


    No I don't think it was a good idea. Lazy and ill-advised, is what I would call it. I would never have dreamt of calling and bothering staff nurses for information I could/should seek for myself. That is part of the learning process in school, right----- how to gather data, assess and apply it, or am I wrong? Further, that is what I thought pre-clinical was for, to learn HOW to gather your OWN data (not rely on another nurse)----and use it. That is part of learning how to be a nurse.

    Also, pre-clinical allowed us to visit the patients we were responsible for the next day, further gathing useful data. How is that gonna happen if a student wants the already busy staff nurse to do the legwork for her/him? I would not be impressed in the least.....

    I hope the processes of learning in nursing school have not changed that much.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Nov 22, '05
  12. by   Q.
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    . That is part of the learning process in school, right----- how to gather data, assess and apply it, or am I wrong? Further, that is what I thought pre-clinical was for, to learn HOW to gather your OWN data (not rely on another nurse)----and use it. That is part of learning how to be a nurse.
    Physically going to the unit and copying down a list of medications is not a learning process.

    Looking up the medications and figuring out how they interact with one another or the patient's condition IS.

    HIPAA considerations yes should be accounted for, naturally.

    I am not saying I would advocate my students to do this; I am saying that I don't necessarily find this as doing the student's homework for her. The homework is the actual work and thinking, not copying down words.
  13. by   Tweety
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    That is part of the learning process in school, right----- how to gather data, assess and apply it, or am I wrong? Further, that is what I thought pre-clinical was for, to learn HOW to gather your OWN data (not rely on another nurse)----and use it. That is part of learning how to be a nurse.

    I'm not going to defend the student who called. We had to go in. Maybe he/she did go in and just wanted an update, but it did take balls to do that and I wouldn't have given him/her a bit of information over the phone.

    However, in the real world do we not rely on each other as part of the gathering of data. We aren't completely on our own. I personally rely on shift change report, report from the charge nurse, report from case managers/discharge planners, doctors, all sorts of people to give me information.

    Part of learning to be a nurse is collaboration with peers. If we as staff nurses shoot them down, that's not good either is it?

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