Nurses Being brought in from another country - page 5

Not sure how I feel about this and I'm wondering if anyone out there has experienced this with there hospital. The hospital I currently work in is bringing 15 nurses from another country in to work... Read More

  1. by   charebec65
    Quote from purplemania
    They are certainly better than new grads!!
    Hmmm..... It was my impression that at some point, ALL of us were new grads.....
  2. by   ANnot4me
    I moved from the US to New Zealand and I was there a couple of weeks and was doing a neuro assessment on a man who was less than 24-hours post a severe stroke (they thought he was going to die). He could speak, but made little sense. He did not know his name and several other things, but I asked him who the president was and he replied "Of what?" I laughed and apologized and asked him who Prime Minister was and he answered some past PM who I was not familiar with. I then asked him "Where are you right now? What is this place?" He replied "America?" His wife and I laughed and laughed. He then asked me if I was going to the free piss up at the station tonight and I looked puzzled and thought him mad and his wife translated and said they were going to a party with free alcohol on a ranch the night he had the stroke. The wife got a moment of seriously needed levity and we bonded. I'll never forget that man (he lived and made a great recovery). Regardless of the language difficulties, I established a great relationship with the family. I have lots of other similar stories and I must say that I have spoke English all my life and had several weeks of adjustment to the sound of a strong, southern Kiwi accent. For weeks I thought a "doofer" was a trapeze over the bed....
  3. by   ZASHAGALKA
    I'm just not too concerned about hospitals taking 'stopgap' measures to fix their problems. Are they going to foreign sources to avoid fixing problems and to keep salaries down and working conditions poor? Yes, I think that is an accurate assessment.

    However, the longer they DON'T fix their problems, the bigger those problems mount in terms of the relative 'shortage' in that facility: translation - nurses won't work there.

    Foreign nurses cannot change that matrix. They couldn't recruit enough if they threw our borders wide open.

    So, while I harbor the same general concerns vis a vi: motivations of management, I just think reality doesn't well suit their goals.

    In the meantime, the cost/benefit ratio to that foreign nurse to have the opportunity to come here is shifted far in favor of the immigrant than it is towards the goals of management.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  4. by   Tweety
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    I'm just not too concerned about hospitals taking 'stopgap' measures to fix their problems. Are they going to foreign sources to avoid fixing problems and to keep salaries down and working conditions poor? Yes, I think that is an accurate assessment.

    However, the longer they DON'T fix their problems, the bigger those problems mount in terms of the relative 'shortage' in that facility: translation - nurses won't work there.

    Foreign nurses cannot change that matrix. They couldn't recruit enough if they threw our borders wide open.

    So, while I harbor the same general concerns vis a vi: motivations of management, I just think reality doesn't well suit their goals.

    In the meantime, the cost/benefit ratio to that foreign nurse to have the opportunity to come here is shifted far in favor of the immigrant than it is towards the goals of management.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    I agree.
  5. by   edwards1a
    I am a Canadian nurse who works 6 months out of the year in the US. We also get alot of foriegn nurses to work in the remote areas of Canada....there is a language barrier and also they have trouble with the work....they were not told what to expect when they got here...especially the part where they need to work alone with limited doctors and they have a hard time adapting to this....after being brought in they were to write the Canadain boards and have not been able to pass them yet after a 2nd try.....because they were brought in by an agency they make more then the average rn does despite not having passed thier exams...this does not sit well with us.....hope this is not happening in the US...have only worked with travels..US and Canadian and have not had a problem all the nurses I have worked with are great
  6. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from DogWalk
    MrsCleverclogs: I agree about the language. I'm not native in English myself, but don't have a heavy accent and feel I'm able to communicate fluently (have learnt English since I was 10.) I know there are some "slang words" and abbreviations which may be alien to me, but I'm absorbing new words and am willing to learn. Anyhow, being able to communicate sufficiently is a definite must!
    That's not a problem, and I doubt most people would have an issue with this. There's a big problem, however, with nurses from another country who hang together and speak their native language other than at break time. That's rude and only fosters ill feelings among staff.
  7. by   madwife2002
    So what is the solution?
  8. by   suzy253
    Quote from purplemania
    The corp. who owns us contracted with nurses in Kenya for 2 years, then spread them out among various corp hospitals. The first one we got is bright, cheerful and fun to work with, but her skills left a lot to be desired. I have to assess skills on the second nurse this week. Both used to work ICU but neither could start IV's or do many of the skills American nurses are charged with, simply because nurses in other countries do not always have the same level of responsibility as we do. HOWEVER, these ladies are an asset. When our census was low in the summer we had some grumbling because our regular staff was forced to take time off but the contract nurse did not. I don't know the terms of the contracts regarding level of pay, but overall my impression is we have two good nurses, as long as they are placed in the appropriate unit. They are certainly better than new grads!!
    "Skills left a lot to be desired".........."assess skills on the second nurse".....
    "could not start IV's, etc. etc."
    And this is better than a new grad, which as the other poster pointed out that we were all new grads at one time?
  9. by   madwife2002
    The B all and end of inserting an IV cannule does not make a nurse, in fact in the UK hardly any nurses insert IV cannules but there are excellent nurses. I reckon most people can be trained to insert IV's but it doesnt make them a nurse, does it.

    In the UK we have phlebotomists they just draw blood-they are not nurses.

    In haemodialysis units techs dialysis-no nurses there.
    I have run a haemo unit with me being the only trained nurse.

    It takes more than just isolated jobs to make a trained nurse, it is the whole package deal.
  10. by   catlady
    Quote from madwife2002
    It takes more than just isolated jobs to make a trained nurse, it is the whole package deal.
    Well put.

    That was one of the hardest things to get across to my students when I was teaching--it was not the collection of technical tasks they were learning that would make them a nurse. It's also, IMO, one of the major points that separate new nurses from experienced nurses.
  11. by   Silverdragon102
    I am, all being well, moving to the US at the beginning of the new year. I will be coming with 20 years nursing experience. The hospitals I worked at in the UK expected their nurses especially the senior RN's to have experience in IV cannulation, venupuncture and IV additives and bolus. Many a time I have had to mix IV therapy especially IV antibiotics as pharmacy said they did not have the staff to perform this service especially at weekends and nights. I am scared at the move as I will be leaving my family and friends, yes I know that is my choice and I look forward to the move. I am hoping the hospital and staff will understand that although I have experience it is different to how things are done in the UK and will give me the time and understanding whilst I adapt.
  12. by   RGN1
    :yeahthat:
  13. by   suzy253
    I have no problem with nurses from other countries. In my post, I was commenting about 'better than new grads'.....because I'm a new grad & it disturbs me to read that as we were/are all new grads at one time. I'm proud to have received my RN at age 53 and hope my health holds out to give quality nursing care for as long as I can. :wink2:

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