nurses are fortunate

  1. coincidentally at work last night i had 3 patients that shared with me the lost of their jobs. two of the patients were just laid off and another patient's job was relocating. these people were afraid. one lady was there because the stress of not being able to pay her bills gave her panic attacks and so she consistently suffered chest pain for 2 days. another developed irritable bowel syndrome because of her worries over how she was going to continue to live off unemployment until another job came through. i know i am blessed to have a job, but sometimes it takes another persons suffering for others to really appreciate what they have. i know for many of us, nursing is not a glamorous job. it can stressful. demanding. and we may not get compesnsated the way we should. but we all have one thing in common and that is we have the opportunity to help people every day get through life crisis. i thank god every day for giving me my health and strength to go to work. to provide for myself and my family. and even though i may get overwhelmed at times i know that i make a difference. i don't really think about being unemployed because it has never been an issue since i started a career in healthcare. but after listening to these people last night i can't help but acknowledge the big impact nurses have on society. just the short moments i spent with these patients to tell them how sorry i am for their circumstances and telling them things would get better, made them feel like someone cares. i know that i am fortunate. i would like to know from other nurses has there ever been a patient or circumstance that made you feel very lucky to have your job?
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  2. 19 Comments

  3. by   Q.
    I would agree that anyone who was employed has an element of "luck" to it, but I wouldn't just place the entire nursing profession in the bucket of "grateful to be employed."

    Due to financial problems, we had to lay off one of our nurse educators last week.

    Nurses and nursing aren't always protected.
  4. by   dphrn
    When I think of being employed as a nurse, I do not think of the word "luck". I think of all the hard work and the sacrifices that I, my husband, and children had to make during the time I was in nursing school, and luck is not a word that comes to my mind.

    I have a lot of empathy for people who struggle with employment problems. It makes me feel very grateful that I was able to complete my goal of becoming a nurse. For that, I do agree with you about thanking God often for my health, strength and the ability to finish school and have a rewarding career.
    Last edit by dphrn on May 20, '04
  5. by   missmercy
    Nearly every day.... nearly every patient....

    Not only am I greatful for the job, but the health to do it, "relatively normal" family members, an active and intelligent mind, etc....

    I consistantly see alot of folks who have either few or none of those blessings!!!
  6. by   angel337
    Quote from dphrn
    When I think of being employed as a nurse, I do not think of the word "luck". I think of all the hard work and the sacrifices that I, my husband, and children had to make during the time I was in nursing school, and luck is not a word that comes to my mind.

    I have a lot of empathy for people who struggle with employment problems. It makes me feel very grateful that I was able to complete my goal of becoming a nurse. For that, I do agree with you about thanking God often for my health, strength and the ability to finish school and have a rewarding career.
    i agree with you. i probably should have selected another word other than "luck". i know that there is no such thing as a "secure" job. any of us could lose our jobs tomorrow. i just say that because i think that nurses are in a fortuante position to help others in a time of crisis, not so much as being "lucky" to have a job. i know what you mean about sacrifices. i could write a book about the struggles i went through (including unemployment) when trying to complete nursing school. thanks for your response!
  7. by   fergus51
    Luck is when preparation meets opportunity and should never be taken to mean that no hard work was required. JMHO
  8. by   renerian
    I have been laid off 6 times as a nurse. NO one is safe in reality.

    renerian
  9. by   psychomachia
    Quote from renerian
    NO one is safe in reality.

    renerian
    Guess I better head over to unreality...
  10. by   renerian
    That message sure sounded paranoid didn't it? LOL. I meant no one was immune to a lay off potential

    renerian
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    some people MAKE their own fortune. Trust me, nurses are not where they are cause someone "handed" it to them.
  12. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Before I became a nurse, I was a factory worker for ten years.
    I was exposed to toxins and carcinogens, illegally. Some of my old co-workers have died from the exposures, and others are seriously, chronically ill. Google berylliosis to read about it. I am grateful that I was somehow spared. My co-workers and I helped make WMD for The U.S.

    I made pitifully low wages, and was laid off many times. We were treated like crap.

    Now that I'm a nurse, I make better money, and have never been laid off. I do, however, risk exposure to HIV, HBV and HCV daily. Many of my pts have these diseases. I've had several dirty needle sticks in my nursing career. Thankfully, I've again been spared. When I have been treated like crap, I have been able to get another job.

    There is no "shortage" where I live. In fact, there is a surplus of nurses. It was hard to find a job when we moved here. Even so, most nurses can find work. If your career is in manufacturing, on the other hand, you are SOL. Manufacturing is all but dead in this country.

    Whenever I am disgusted with nursing, I try and remember what it was like for me in the factories.

    I am blessed.
  13. by   renerian
    No further comment. I may be reading a post with incorrect intent.

    Everyone have a wonderful night,

    ren
  14. by   NP2BE
    Quote from Susy K
    I would agree that anyone who was employed has an element of "luck" to it, but I wouldn't just place the entire nursing profession in the bucket of "grateful to be employed."

    Due to financial problems, we had to lay off one of our nurse educators last week.

    Nurses and nursing aren't always protected.
    He or she will probably be able to find another job right away, although it may not pay as much or be as nice, they will still have decent income.

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