Nurses and smoking - page 7

Do you think it is ok if a nurse or a doctor smokes? Because i know when i go to the doctors office with my boyfriend and he tells him that he smokes that he gos on and on of how he shouldnt be... Read More

  1. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Your body; your right to do what you want. As an adult, if you choose to smoke, I say go ahead and enjoy it....I really believe that.

    But NOT around me or the patients, please. I don't care how much you wash your hands or how much gum you chew. Your smoke residues are very offensive esp to those of us with history of migraines and allergies. I can walk away from a nurse if her smoke smell offends me. However the patients cannot. It's really unfair to them. I really believe smoking should never be done on duty. Nothing on earth worse than smelling cigarette residue when one is sick, trust me.
  2. by   Nemhain
    I've been a casual smoker for 16 yrs now. I buy just one pack a month (if that). I don't smoke at work. I have my one cigarette after work at home. I'm fully aware of the consequences of smoking, but my one cigarette helps me relax. I usually light up when I watch "King of the Hill" - it's my ritual and I love it!
    I think it's fine for doctors/nurses to smoke...as long as they don't smell like they do.

    rockin' in the free world,
    Nemhain
  3. by   Tweety
    Don't hate me because I'm an ex-smoker, and tell me "ex-smokers are the worst critics, so judgemental". I haven't smoked in 20 years, but from age 16 to age 24 I strugged to quit the entire time and hated/loved ciggarettes. So my point is I fully understand why people smoke, and there's a myriad of reasons.

    It's your body, your choice, do what you want. Same with obesity.

    I'm keeping my mouth shut on this one too.
  4. by   Palpitations
    I just recently started smoking about a year ago. I'm 44 years old. It was being around all of the patients that smoked and the nurses that smoked that encouraged me to smoke. My children aren't happy that I've started to smoke. They asked me what would I do if they started to smoke? I told them if they wanted to start smoking when their 43 that it would be okay with me. I have to admit that it appeared to me that nurses that smoked got more breaks. Also, I couldn't understand how a person that was dying from lung disease or heart disease could continue to smoke, but it seemed to give them so much satisfaction and it calmed their nerves better than the medication. I felt that it they were terminal, stopping smoking, at this point, wasn't going to stop them from being terminal. I also saw many nurses that were severely overweight that would have the nerve to talk about the nurses that smoked. I kind of thought that was strange. Smoking calmed my nerves while I was going through a crisis on my job. The hospital was closing several units including the one that I worked in and I had been newly diagnosed with a goiter and was going to have to have a surgery. I had a lot of complications from the surgery. One being that the doctor didn't put in a drain and my neck swoll up like a balloon, and I couldn't breathe; necessitating another surgery the next day where I was intubated in the right mainstem bronchus, which caused my left lung to collapse. Woke up in MICU on a ventilator. Later found out that both of my vocal cords had been paralyzed necessitating a tracheostomy. Found out that the surgeon nicked my parathyroids and I have been having muscle cramps and laryngospasms, etc...and I don't have a job and I need to find one, but who's going to hire a person with a tracheostomy? So now, I smoke with a tracheostomy. I use to judge those people. How dare they! Tsk! I didn't have larygngeal cancer as most people would think. My doctor did it to me. Now, I smoke more because my nerves are really bad. I think that it was stress that started me, but it could be some sort of revenge thing. I know. I'm only hurting myself. I know it's crazy!

    ______________________
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Your body; your right to do what you want. As an adult, if you choose to smoke, I say go ahead and enjoy it....I really believe that.

    But NOT around me or the patients, please. I don't care how much you wash your hands or how much gum you chew. Your smoke residues are very offensive esp to those of us with history of migraines and allergies. I can walk away from a nurse if her smoke smell offends me. However the patients cannot. It's really unfair to them. I really believe smoking should never be done on duty. Nothing on earth worse than smelling cigarette residue when one is sick, trust me.
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I've seen a few people that say "as long as they don't smell like it". I have yet to work with a smoker at work that DOESN'T smell like an ashtray, even if they smoked at home and wear facility-issued scrubs.

    (And hopefully none like that girl on the on med-surg floor who thinks 3 or 4 sprays of body spray gets rid of it. Great, the smell of an ashtray, combined with body spray that smells like a Glade Air Freshner from the reject pile. Gag.)
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from Palpitations
    I just recently started smoking about a year ago. I'm 44 years old. It was being around all of the patients that smoked and the nurses that smoked that encouraged me to smoke. My children aren't happy that I've started to smoke. They asked me what would I do if they started to smoke? I told them if they wanted to start smoking when their 43 that it would be okay with me. I have to admit that it appeared to me that nurses that smoked got more breaks. Also, I couldn't understand how a person that was dying from lung disease or heart disease could continue to smoke, but it seemed to give them so much satisfaction and it calmed their nerves better than the medication. I felt that it they were terminal, stopping smoking, at this point, wasn't going to stop them from being terminal. I also saw many nurses that were severely overweight that would have the nerve to talk about the nurses that smoked. I kind of thought that was strange. Smoking calmed my nerves while I was going through a crisis on my job. The hospital was closing several units including the one that I worked in and I had been newly diagnosed with a goiter and was going to have to have a surgery. I had a lot of complications from the surgery. One being that the doctor didn't put in a drain and my neck swoll up like a balloon, and I couldn't breathe; necessitating another surgery the next day where I was intubated in the right mainstem bronchus, which caused my left lung to collapse. Woke up in MICU on a ventilator. Later found out that both of my vocal cords had been paralyzed necessitating a tracheostomy. Found out that the surgeon nicked my parathyroids and I have been having muscle cramps and laryngospasms, etc...and I don't have a job and I need to find one, but who's going to hire a person with a tracheostomy? So now, I smoke with a tracheostomy. I use to judge those people. How dare they! Tsk! I didn't have larygngeal cancer as most people would think. My doctor did it to me. Now, I smoke more because my nerves are really bad. I think that it was stress that started me, but it could be some sort of revenge thing. I know. I'm only hurting myself. I know it's crazy!

    ______________________
    why not ask for ativan or an SSRI or other drug, and get some counseling instead for your anxiety? I am with your kids; taking up smoking at your age is very very ill-advised. It is at any age, but in your 40s??? I guess I am missing something here.
  7. by   Palpitations
    I'm already on all that stuff. I even tried Wellbrutin. Didn't work. I've been in counseling ever since my husband became disabled in 1984. As my kids would tell me when I'm giving them advise that they don't want to take, "It's my life!".

    Let he/she whom is without sin cast the first stone. (Guess who said that?)

    Thanks for the advice, it's all good! Right?

    "Whatever dude" is my 2-year-old grandson's favorite thing to say, lately.

    Melinda

    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    why not ask for ativan or an SSRI or other drug, and get some counseling instead for your anxiety? I am with your kids; taking up smoking at your age is very very ill-advised. It is at any age, but in your 40s??? I guess I am missing something here.
  8. by   maddiecat
    Quote from CCL"Babe"
    I really don't like the way tobacco smoke smells on smokers. I'm an ex-smoker. I try never to preach.

    My hospital just made a policy that no one-visitors, staff, anyone is allowed to smoke on hospital property. I think that is very wrong. Patients are not allowed to leave the campus to smoke. Staff must cross the street to smoke.

    This is to "promote healthy lifestyles" ... but what about all the fried food in the cafeteria?
    I just had to respond to this one 'cause it's been burning me up that one of the best cardiac hospitals in the COUNTRY here has a McDonald's in it!!!!!
    AARRRGGHHHH
  9. by   EarthChild1130
    I have never smoked...never even held a cig in my life...but I have watched my mother try to quit for the past 20 years and I can't for the life of me understand why someone now, in this day and age who knows fully well what it does to your body, would choose to do such a thing...

    Really, what someone does on their own time is their own business, but I don't think it's appropriate for people to smoke at work or get 'smoke breaks' because they come in smelling like smoke, and it's not fair to other employees when someone is taking upwards of 4 breaks a day to go smoke... ? If ya wanna puff on your time, that's cool...but not on my time! lol
  10. by   skanded
    I don't like to see medical professionals smoke, it seems unprofessional to me. We all know the harmful effects. How can we instruct others not to do it then do it ourselves?
  11. by   Heartattaq
    Bottom line it is everyones choice whether they want to or not, and i respect that 100 percent.

    My opinion though is another matter lol. As a nurse I don't think it holds much weight to instruct say a cardiac patient on the necessity of quitting smoking because it greatly benefits health, and then go out and blaze one up. Also when I was a patient with my ulcerative colitis, nothing was more disgusting then the smell on the clothes and breath of a nurse who was in caring for me when I could barely move, after one of their smoke breaks, it was nasty.

    But to each his own, it is your body, do to it whatever you choose.
  12. by   TEXAS_onc_RN
    You were hiding between two parked cars like a school aged child sneaking Cig's from her parents? Jeez, if it wasn't so pathetic it would almost be funny. I'm glad the security guard saw you, at least you can feel secure that some rapist or mugger isn't going to be able to hide between cars and get away with it. So you quit that job? did you explain to your manager why you were leaving? Did you try to use this experience to help out the other employees who are staying behind that want to be able to smoke and offer the facility positive criticism to implement a smoking policy?
    Were you aware of the facilities smoking ban when you accepted the position?
  13. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from CCL"Babe"
    I really don't like the way tobacco smoke smells on smokers. I'm an ex-smoker. I try never to preach.

    My hospital just made a policy that no one-visitors, staff, anyone is allowed to smoke on hospital property. I think that is very wrong. Patients are not allowed to leave the campus to smoke. Staff must cross the street to smoke.

    This is to "promote healthy lifestyles" ... but what about all the fried food in the cafeteria?
    :chuckle I've never heard of second hand fried food smoke

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