Nurses and smoking - page 4

Do you think it is ok if a nurse or a doctor smokes? Because i know when i go to the doctors office with my boyfriend and he tells him that he smokes that he gos on and on of how he shouldnt be... Read More

  1. by   mrsabradford
    Sad Story.

    Thank you for sharing that with us.

    MJ
  2. by   talullahmae
    While I agree that it is each person's body and their personal decision, smoking creates an odor and can be carried in to the working environment on clothing, etc which I seems not only unprofessional but potentially hazardous to some patients.
  3. by   mittels
    I still smoke. I smoke out side at home. I do not smoke at work. Who has time? I wear a patch 4 days a week, and yes I did quit for 2 years. Dont ask why I restarted. I just know it relieves stress. I dont drink nor do drugs execpt nicotine.
  4. by   NurseDianne
    Doctors and Nurses are people too! And as a reformed smoker...yeah 16months smoke free. I do understand how totally difficult it is to quit. I loved to smoke. In fact, this very moment I could smoke one from here to the road and be totolly happy! But, sadly, I wouldn't be able to breath. Hey, I have asthma and still I smoked. Heavily. My huney still smokes, he smokes outside, and yes we are both nurses and know the risk. I just think we ought not bad mouth the smokers. It doesn't help!
  5. by   tntrn
    Having never smoked and not really being addicted to anything, I won't tell anybody that they should "just quit' because I truly have no idea how hard that might be. My dad quit cold turkey before I was born, and I'm so grateful to him for that. I am really allergic to cigarette smoke and can sniff out a puff from 500 yards.

    As a Labor Nurse, I can't tell you how many times I have labor patients remark about "how good that other nurse was, but she smelled of smoke." Those of you who think you hide all traces of smoke after your breaks (and thanks for making that effort) might be surprised to know that some of us can still smell the odors emanating from your clothing or your hair. As a patient, I'd request a reassignment.
  6. by   nyapa
    I am a non smoker and always have been. However, the product, much as I hate it and what it does, is legal. Thus pts and allied health professionals legally have the right to smoke. BUT...what really annoys me is nurses who lecture end stage COAD pts about their smoking, and have the temerity to become personally affronted by these same pts going outside straight after a nebuliser, when the nurse is a nicotine addict as well. Double standards is what I hate.
  7. by   Monica RN,BSN
    I would agree that to some of the persons who visit a healthcare facility, it would seem unprofessional... But we are living in the 2000's, a whole new era in time.... One should do what they want if they are old enough and know the health risks involved. We have areas that are out of view at our facility where no visitors, family or doctors go. ( Staff only )
  8. by   blondielaine7rn
    I personally don't smoke, and I can't see how nurses could do that to themselves! Most of us have seen an elderly person who can't hardly breathe b/c they smoked their whole lives. I just don't ever want to be like that. I do think it's a person's choice to smoke if they please, and I'm not going to get on someone's case about it b/c we are all aware of the consequences. By the way, I work at a womans hospital that centers around the birthing process, and smoking is prohibited anywhere on the premises (even outside and in the parking garage). It's for the health of the newborns. Does anyone else have this at your hospital?
  9. by   kea6783
    I would love to expect doctors and nurses to 'practice what they preach', but I don't think it would happen. How many MD/RNs do you know that exercise on a regular basis, drink 64 ozs of water a day, etc? I'm only a student, and I can't even find the time or energy to do all that. On a side note, I would love to be able to eat small meals every few hours, but no chance when I have to pee so bad sometimes I know I'm not going to have any bladder control when I'm 50. More often than not, when I get a second to eat, I overeat.. so unhealthy..
  10. by   TitaniaSidhe
    No different than everyone who has a glass of wine after a long hard day to unwind, or the person who first thing upon entering the kitchen in the morning grabs their cup of coffee or soda before heading off to work. Everyone uses something be it a substance or behavior to cope with life on a day to day basis. Some of us make healthier choices than others. The key word is choice, it is ours to make, each & every one of us. I do however feel that we do not have the right to impose our personal choice on others, most especially our children. As for the lingering smell of smoke on a person, how many of us use perfume or cologne, scented body lotion?? I can't begin to tell you how many times I have had to smell some god aweful perfume or cologne which I find equally as offensive as the smell of smoke. Lastly, I am not critisizing but rather presenting differing points of view for most of all I belive that if you live in a glass house, & we all do, then you should not be throwing stones.
  11. by   kateRN
    I think that it's not "unprofessional" for nurses/doctors to smoke, but being as informed as we are about the dangers of smoking, it seems pretty dumb to continue to smoke. Especially because we actually SEE what it does to people right in front of our eyes. (ex. a 60 yr. old who looks 80 or 50) BUT I don't think that it's anyone's right to judge or say that it is unprofessional... unless you are telling your pt.s not to smoke and then going outside and smoking where they can see you. We all know what we SHOULD be doing, but what we actually do is another story. I tell my patients to exercise 3-4 times a week... right... good thing they don't see me at the gym...
  12. by   mrsabradford
    Originally posted by TitaniaSidhe
    No different than everyone who has a glass of wine after a long hard day to unwind, or the person who first thing upon entering the kitchen in the morning grabs their cup of coffee or soda before heading off to work. Everyone uses something be it a substance or behavior to cope with life on a day to day basis. Some of us make healthier choices than others. The key word is choice, it is ours to make, each & every one of us. I do however feel that we do not have the right to impose our personal choice on others, most especially our children. As for the lingering smell of smoke on a person, how many of us use perfume or cologne, scented body lotion?? I can't begin to tell you how many times I have had to smell some god aweful perfume or cologne which I find equally as offensive as the smell of smoke. Lastly, I am not critisizing but rather presenting differing points of view for most of all I belive that if you live in a glass house, & we all do, then you should not be throwing stones.
    You can smoke all you want as long as it doesn't effect me. But if I have to get up in the middle of the night unable to breath due to my asthma because some A..hole felt he had a right to smoke, but I don't have a right to breath in smoke free air then yes I will be the first one to throw the stone! Where is it?
  13. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Originally posted by TitaniaSidhe
    No different than everyone who has a glass of wine after a long hard day to unwind, or the person who first thing upon entering the kitchen in the morning grabs their cup of coffee or soda before heading off to work.
    Wrong.

    A smoker's second hand smoke affects ME. WHen i drink a glass of wine, the other person in the room isn't tasting what i am drinking unless they themselves are having a glass with me.

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