Nurses and smoking - page 11

Do you think it is ok if a nurse or a doctor smokes? Because i know when i go to the doctors office with my boyfriend and he tells him that he smokes that he gos on and on of how he shouldnt be... Read More

  1. by   thatoneguy
    for the obesity thing, how can you teach a patient to eat right and then go have your twinky at lunch time, wheater its once a month or not. a twinky is in no way good for you. if you have done this once your a hypocrite.

    for the creditbility of an obese dietician, do they have to tell you their personal medical problem in order to be credible. why cant their knowledge and schooling sever as their credibility.
  2. by   DaFreak71
    o i know you wanted more links well here you go.
    http://www.rowatworks.com/science/incineratortoxic/
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/369169.stm
    http://www.azdeq.gov/environ/air/vei/
    [/quote]

    lol, your first link deals with incinerators, not cars.
    your second link contained this:


    [font=arial, helvetica]
    [font=arial, helvetica]
    but a british gp, a former chairman of the gps in asthma group, said that while car pollution worsened existing asthma, there was little evidence that it actually caused the condition.
    [font=arial, helvetica]dr dermot ryan, a loughborough gp, said that the focus should fall instead on cigarette smoking as the primary villain.
    [font=arial, helvetica]"i'm not too sure car pollution is the number one enemy. 400 people a day are dying in this country due to cigarette smoking," he said.

    [font=arial, helvetica]
    thanks for proving my point for me.


    [font=arial, helvetica]your third link was basically an arizona deq page that said air pollution is linked with health problems. i didn't see where it said that driving to work on the freeway caused death.

    [font=arial, helvetica]adri
  3. by   thatoneguy
    Quote from lostdruid
    Adri
    i guess your are that thickheaded. there are a few relegions that dont drive, so it is a choice to drive, as some dont do it. just because driving is more accepted dose not mean your choice to do so has no effect on my health. you still think it has no effect on my health, wow. BTW show me where it says smoking will kill you. all the research will say the same thing as auto emissions, "can lead to or cause a disease" none say it will kill you.
    i guess in your mind all those doc and nurses that eat a dounut with their coffee every morning are not credible if they tell their patients not eat such things, huh.

    i see you, like many i suppose, just want everyone to live as themselves. well good luck with that.
  4. by   DaFreak71
    Quote from thatoneguy
    for the obesity thing, how can you teach a patient to eat right and then go have your twinky at lunch time, wheater its once a month or not. a twinky is in no way good for you. if you have done this once your a hypocrite.

    I see, according to you, if anyone has ever driven on the freeway or eaten a twinkie (even once!) then you are a hypocrite. That is some pretty interesting logic. You equate someone who actively engages in a habit KNOWN to cause death with someone who ate 40 grams of sugar in a Twinkie? Show me where it's been proven that 40g of sugar is just as deadly as smoking all day every day. Otherwise your claim that they are hypocrites is absurd.


    Eating a twinkie once or occsionally= nice treat
    Smoking cigarettes = deadly

    Once again you are comparing apples to oranges.


    Adri

    P.S. Good dieticians and nurses tell their patients to follow a healthy diet, but that there isn't anything wrong with an occasional splurge.
  5. by   thatoneguy
    lol, your first link deals with incinerators, not cars.
    your second link contained this:
    what here is my first links first part notice its about car emissons. read more carefully.

    environmental health center

    http://www.nsc.org/graphics/hline.gif
    what you can do about car emissions

    better car maintenance can save money, improve safety, and reduce pollution


    this fact sheet has the following sections:
    to view a section, scroll through the document or click on the section you wish to go to.
    http://www.nsc.org/graphics/blu_line.gifcar emissions — a problem?


    according to the u.s. environmental protection agency (epa), driving a car is the single most polluting thing that most of us do. motor vehicles emit millions of tons of pollutants into the air each year. in many urban areas, motor vehicles are the single largest contributor to ground-level ozone, a major component of smog. ground-level ozone is the most serious air pollution problem in the northeast and mid-atlantic states. cars also emit several pollutants classified as toxics, which cause as many as 1,500 cases of cancer in the country each year. auto emissions also contribute to the environmental problems of acid rain and global warning.
    pollution control measures have drastically reduced emissions per vehicle in the past 20 years. however, during that time the total miles traveled has doubled, resulting in higher levels of air pollutants in many parts of the country. what pollutants do motor vehicles emit and what are the health effects?


    motor vehicles generate three major pollutants: hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide.
    • hydrocarbons react with nitrogen oxides in the presence of sunlight and elevated temperatures to form ground-level ozone. it can cause eye irritation, coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath and can lead to permanent lung damage.
    • nitrogen oxides (nox) also contribute to the formation of ozone and contribute to the formation of acid rain and to water quality problems.
    • carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, deadly gas. it reduces the flow of oxygen in the bloodstream and can impair mental functions and visual perception. in urban areas, motor vehicles are responsible for as much as 90 percent of carbon monoxide in the air.
    motor vehicles also emit large amounts of carbon dioxide, which has potential to trap the earth's heat and cause global warning. where do these pollutants come from?

    [font=arial, helvetica]
    or did you miss this.

    Last edit by thatoneguy on Jan 21, '06
  6. by   thatoneguy
    Quote from lostdruid
    Adri

    P.S. Good dieticians and nurses tell their patients to follow a healthy diet, but that there isn't anything wrong with an occasional splurge.
    still must a obese dietician tell you their personal health issues to be creditble. thats the point.
  7. by   thatoneguy
    Quote from lostdruid
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] I didn't see where it said that driving to work on the freeway caused death.

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica]Adri
    no report will say that and no report will say smoking causes death either.
  8. by   DaFreak71
    This has turned into a two person forum and I am withdrawing. I have no interest in convincing you of something that you don't want to believe. This has turned from a thought provoking topic to a tit-for-tat brawl and it has ceased to become constructive.

    My mother in law has a saying:

    Let them that can't see, feel.

    peace out,
    Adri

    FYI: Many articles claim that smoking causes death: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/press/re...s09122003.html
    and
    http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/...828440520.html
    and
    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/...in572833.shtml
    and
    http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/research_...es/mortali.htm

    What I couldn't find was any articles that said eating one twinkie or driving your car to work causes death from exhaust.
    Last edit by DaFreak71 on Jan 21, '06
  9. by   thatoneguy
    these are not research reports, only one the last one, and they dont say smoking kills you they simply say. The main causes of death attributable to smoking were cardiovascular disease (1.7 million deaths), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (just under one million) and lung cancer (approximately 850,000). attributable is the kry word here.
    anyway dont try to tell me what to do on my break, suggest doing something about the smell, maybe lobby the hospital or where ever to not allow smoking on hospital grounds. just dont come to me and complain about me doing something that is with in the rules. if they change the rule i will go by that. in the mean time you should respect the fact i am going by the rules. its fine you dont agree with smokers but until its against the rules dont persecute them.
  10. by   CuriousMe
    I really don't have control issues (well, ok....I probably have one or two control issues....but that's with me, not you ). I couldn't care less that you choose to smoke. Don't care what you eat, or any other of those choices. However, I also have pretty severe asthma and cigarette smoke is my primary trigger (not car emissions)....so while I have great tolerance for smokers, my lungs have none for their smoke.

    I don't believe that the world should stop smoking because I'm sensitive to it. I've pretty much changed my lifestyle to avoid smoke....I don't go to bars anymore, I don't go to restaurants that permit smoking,etc.... I've learned this from experience (last time I was in a smoky bar for a few hours...I was on prednisone for over two months to combat the resulting flare-up and my lungs are more reactive now then they were then). I also finally convinced my Dad that he can't smoke in my car....despite the fact that he's holding the cigarette out the window...I've finally gotten through to him, that he's exhaling smoke and unless he's going to keep his head out the window with the cigarette, smoking isn't going to happen. I'm on maintenance meds and I stay really controlled, unless I'm exposed to cigarette smoke.

    One place I have problems is when I go to the hospital to see my Doc, or for testing (there's a clinic in the hospital)....I hate the fact that I have to walk through the crowd of smokers going in and I can't even wait outside for my ride....if I try to, I end up having to keep moving around as the wind changes to try and avoid the clumps of Docs and Nurses smoking. I'm all for the hospital that doesn't allow smoking on hospital grounds....the hospital is one place I shouldn't have to worry so much.

    I've also been treated by more than one Doc/Nurse who I had to physically move away from and use my rescue inhaler because the smell of smoke was so strong on them. And, I'm sorry to be the one to break this to you....putting another odor on top of it...be it perfume, cologne or Fabreeze, just makes it worse....not better. I know you're trying to make it better, but it just makes my lungs shut down. It's not the smell of the smoke that gives me problems, it's the chemicals that are causing the smell...so more chemicals on top doesn't help and usually hurts. Thankfully, I haven't run into this while in the ER for my asthma....but running into cigarette smoke after effects then, well it would be bad news for me.

    Yes, we're all grown folks and we get to make our own decisions....but if you work in the hospital (especially the ER!) please know that your smoking during work hours could be effecting those around you. I know I'm not the norm by any stretch....but I'm also not the only one out here with respiratory issues.


    Peace,
    Cathie


    Quote from thatoneguy
    this is a funny thread. it always amazes me how non smokers get so affended. everyone talks about second hand smoke, come on now.
    A. as nurse you should all know it takes repeated long term exposure to have any harmful effects. if you live in a house where smokers smoke inside, thats one thing, its not the same as walking by a smokers and smelling it. that just does not harm you.
    B. you complain about smokers and the harmful effects of second hand smoke then get in your car and drive on the freeway breathing in all the emissions from your and others cars. why dont you stop driving, after all that effects me and the population more than my smoking effects you.
    C. because we are nurses we should not smoke, please. how many times a week do you eat processed foods. do you drink soda? do you buy your meat and veg's at the store, if so than it is more than likely your eating foods filled with steriods and other things. if we should practice what we preach than why eat like this. and lets not talk about all the exercise you preach to your patients but never do yourself.

    i think its more of a control issue. i do think smokers should have something for the odor while at work. as far as more breaks i dont see it. but i am sure it happens, but why would that get you upset? if you ask for a break and dont get it while a smoker does ok get mad. but that is not the case you just dont want them to get something you dont get, even though you never ask for it. talk about being professional, how is it professional to demand that someone stop doing something that is legal and frankly none of your business. is it right for me to demand you stop driving, and give you a hard time everytime i see you because you drive? being a nurse does not determine your life style.
  11. by   thatoneguy
    Quote from CuriousMe
    Yes, we're all grown folks and we get to make our own decisions....but if you work in the hospital (especially the ER!) please know that your smoking during work hours could be effecting those around you. I know I'm not the norm by any stretch....but I'm also not the only one out here with respiratory issues.
    its not a matter of you should know better. its a matter of tormenting the individual for following the rules. its not the individual smoker that said its ok to smoke. we should not give an attitude to someone that is following the rules. not that you do. i just think its wrong to chastise a person for doing what they have been told is ok to do. your or whoevers gripe is with the legislators and or administration of where you work, not with the individual. smokers smoke where they are told it is ok to do so. am i a bad person who diservers to be disrespected and have my credibility stripped because i am following the rules.
    funniest part of all this is i am not a smoker, not even a ex smoker. i understand what you are saying, but still think it is just wrong to say anything to the smoker, who is a actual person with feeling and everything. sure if they smoke in a area that should not be smoking ok get on them but, if they are smoking in the area they were told was their area to smoke so be it. take it up with administration not that individual. and in no way should anyone show disrespect towards them simply because they dont like the current rules. just because i am one of the only ones that is standing up for the smoker donsent mean i am in the minority that thinks its ok for them to smoke, look at the pole results.
    Last edit by thatoneguy on Jan 21, '06
  12. by   DaFreak71
    You wrongly asserted:

    Quote from thatoneguy
    these are not research reports,

    In fact, they are research reports. Critical reading skills > you.

    Perhaps you've heard of the British Medical Journal? Here's some "research" for you:

    http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/reprint/323/7309/361.pdf

    You then went on to claim:

    The main causes of death attributable to smoking were cardiovascular disease (1.7 million deaths), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (just under one million) and lung cancer (approximately 850,000). attributable is the kry word here.
    anyway dont try to tell me what to do on my break, suggest doing something about the smell, maybe lobby the hospital or where ever to not allow smoking on hospital grounds. just dont come to me and complain about me doing something that is with in the rules. if they change the rule i will go by that. in the mean time you should respect the fact i am going by the rules. its fine you dont agree with smokers but until its against the rules dont persecute them.

    So I guess people don't really die of car accidents either, they die from the injuries caused by the car accident. So is it really wrong to say that car accidents cause death? There has long been a causal link between smoking and death.

    Please point out to me where I ONCE told you that you did not have a right to smoke, point out to where I ONCE told you that YOU PERSONALLY should not smoke, point out to me where I ONCE told you that it should be illegal. What I said (and you keep changing the subject) is that health care workers who smoke hold zero credibility with me.

    I don't want to continue this debate with you because you seem hell bent on making it personal. This isn't good for either one of us, especially you. You can't even make a coherent point, so this has become an exercise in futility.

    Like my mama always told me:
    Don't engage in a battle of the wits with a one armed man.

    Adri

    P.S. you can have the last word. enjoy it.

    Last edit by DaFreak71 on Jan 21, '06
  13. by   thatoneguy
    Quote from lostdruid
    So I guess people don't really die of car accidents either, they die from the injuries caused by the car accident. So is it really wrong to say that car accidents cause death? There has long been a causal link between smoking and death.

    look people die as a result from years of smoking but, they also die as a result from years of breathing in car emissions. i see that. you dont ok
    Please point out to me where I ONCE told you that you did not have a right to smoke, point out to where I ONCE told you that YOU PERSONALLY should not smoke, point out to me where I ONCE told you that it should be illegal. What I said (and you keep changing the subject) is that health care workers who smoke hold zero credibility with me.
    here is what you said about that."The entire concept of "smokers rights" is absurd." i say no it is a right.
    you also said this
    "I know from personal experience that when you smoke you have a lot of guilt and shame about it. This is because you are doing something that you know better than to do. It is wrong and no manner of making comparrisons to freeway drivers is going to make it less wrong." ok did not say i personally should not smoke but did say it was wrong for me to do so. so if your not saying i should not smoke way say its wrong.


    I don't want to continue this debate with you because you seem hell bent on making it personal. This isn't good for either one of us, especially you. You can't even make a coherent point, so this has become an exercise in futility.

    you just dont get my point no matter how i try to tell you. its not about the act of smoking or the effects but your actions towards those that do smoke, which is within the rules/laws.(BTW when i say "your" its not you but everyone. its not personal)

    Like my mama always told me:
    Don't engage in a battle of the wits with a one armed man.
    lol, just for future reference, the saying goes; its a unarmed man, not a one armed man, lol.

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