Nurses & Insurance - page 2

by RN_MishMish 1,933 Views | 18 Comments

Hello! As a fresh new RN, I was wondering what is your opinion on carrying additional insurance policies beyond what is provided by the employer. What is your take regarding the change in the "good sameritan law" and the... Read More


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    I agree with everyone. When there is a lawsuit the facility will only take care of you until your interests and their interests seperate. There was a really good after school special on in the 70's about a true story of a nurse who lost everything- vindicated in the end- but still lost everything. Best $89 I spend every year!!
    queenjean and RN_MishMish like this.
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    who is your policy carrier? Most responses I read on the subject recommend NSO. Is there anything else out there that is worth checking?
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    I have NSO. It seems to be the most common one used here. It's not too expensive either. I wouldn't work without my own insurance.
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    Don't leave home (and go to work) without it!
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    I carry it and will continue to do so after I graduate and become licensed.

    It's a myth that you are more likely to get sued if you have it...b/c no magical database exists where an attorney can look up that information and you don't have to answer questions for the other side either in the event of a suit unless you are in court...and no judge is going to allow that question b/c RN's are not required by the state to carry it.

    However, if you don't carry it, and if you make a mistake...and honest, mistake...the hospital's insurance isn't going to cover you in the event of a lawsuit.

    Also, if you are unjustly accused of something, you will still need to consult with an attorney, and that is something else the insurance covers that if you didn't have it, you would be paying $200 to $300 per hour out of pocket to get legal advice to help you...and that can get expensive if you ever have to go before the BON.

    To me, how can any nurse NOT afford to have it?
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    Very good points, thanks for the insight. Is a policy such as provided by NSO cocvers RN's off duty or between jobs as well? what happens if I act as a good sameritan in any public situations and somebody decided to come after my license?
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    Quote from RN_MishMish
    Very good points, thanks for the insight. Is a policy such as provided by NSO cocvers RN's off duty or between jobs as well? what happens if I act as a good sameritan in any public situations and somebody decided to come after my license?
    The Good Samaritan Act in most states says that you have to act according to your highest level of training.

    You would be held to the standard of an RN if you stopped to render aid...not that of a layperson who had no medical training.

    As long as you acted accordingly within your training, that bars you from being sued, in many states. You would obviously, need to check to see what your particular state says.
    queenjean likes this.
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    Quote from RN_MishMish
    Very good points, thanks for the insight. Is a policy such as provided by NSO cocvers RN's off duty or between jobs as well? what happens if I act as a good sameritan in any public situations and somebody decided to come after my license?
    A good point -- yes, your own, personal liability insurance covers you if you want to volunteer in at a health fair, charity clinic, etc., (or responding to an accident) -- any time you are functioning as a nurse -- whereas your employer's insurance only covers you when you are working for them.

    Marsh is another company that offers nursing liability coverage.
    queenjean likes this.
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    Ask those instructors who recommend against carrying insurance when was the last time the practiced without malpractice insurance? When was the last time they were named in a lawsuit?

    I'll guarantee the first time you get named in some legal action, you will be wishing you had it.

    My LPN nursing instructors recommended against it, too. Of course, none of them had actually practiced nursing outside of the school setting for over two decades. My RN and BSN instructors, particularly the ones who still provide pt care part time, are adament that malpractice insurance is a must.

    I carry mine through NSO.


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