Nurse Calling In Scripts to Pharmacy Illegally - pg.6 | allnurses

Nurse Calling In Scripts to Pharmacy Illegally - page 8

I have a question and a concern. There is a nurse where I work that calls in prescriptions to the local pharmacies for anyone that wants one. Not for narcotics or anything like that but if someone... Read More

  1. Visit  psu_213 profile page
    #65 0
    Quote from jadelpn
    Further, if the pharmacy didn't question who she was prior to picking up said prescription--when you said the antibiotic was only $4.00, that leads me to believe that she must have used your insurance to purchase the same.
    One of the grocery stores near me has free antibiotics and $4 for other prescriptions--no insurance necessary. Also, anyone can go to pick an Rx. They only ask for the birthdate of the person whose name is the the Rx. Not defending this nurse who calls in and picks up rxs., but the pharmacy may not have done anything wrong.
  2. Visit  jadelpn profile page
    #66 0
    Quote from psu_213
    One of the grocery stores near me has free antibiotics and $4 for other prescriptions--no insurance necessary. Also, anyone can go to pick an Rx. They only ask for the birthdate of the person whose name is the the Rx. Not defending this nurse who calls in and picks up rxs., but the pharmacy may not have done anything wrong.
    In my area, there is strict rules about people picking up other people's Rx. You have to sign them out, even antibiotics. And prescriptions are more expensive here, I suppose, as with my insurance it is $6.00--and because they have my insurance on file, it is automatically sent in to the insurance.
    So I am not sure that the pharmacy necessarily did anything wrong, but I do know that often they would like to be informed, as if the OP keeps an eye on her prescription history with them, and the nurse in question is picking up multiple prescriptions in her name without her knowledge, then certainly it could be a loss for them, if the OP should decide to challenge any of it through her insurance, or challenge it at all. But all of that is pure speculation, hence why it is best to inform the pharmacy to flag your chart. It is, and not being a conspiricy theorist, a form of identity theft.
    And a huge breach of HIPAA to have tracked down the OP's DOB that would be needed to call in the prescription to begin with.
    And I have a real issue with the arrogance and control that this nurse seemingly has over her co-workers. Most of us can say that we don't ask for all sorts of drama that one doesn't need--we all have the goal I would think of going in, doing our work, then leaving. This nurse is counting on the fact that everyone will continue to keep their mouth's shut. The nurse in question, in my opinion, is scamming the heck out of each of her co-workers. Which, whatever makes one sleep at night, but do NOT let it invade one's personal life. That is where the line was crossed, and where the OP needs to rectify. Which stinks, as the OP didn't ask for this, but unknowingly became a party to it.
  3. Visit  psu_213 profile page
    #67 0
    Quote from jadelpn
    And I have a real issue with the arrogance and control that this nurse seemingly has over her co-workers.
    I definitely agree with you on this.

    I think you have to inform the doctor. Even though she thinks the doctor has her back or will cover her...well, I'm willing to bet that he does not know what is going on and that he will not approve of this. Before you go to the BON and fall on her sword, go to the doc first and see if he handles it.
  4. Visit  CrunchRN profile page
    #68 0
    In theory all that sounds good, but I have seen too many messengers be the ones who are shot. In reality I would just get away.
  5. Visit  nurse42long profile page
    #69 2
    Again to all who have commented, thank you. As the comments have been split as to what to do and are so heartfelt it has made it harder to decide what to do. I did talk with the Nurse Manager earlier today and told her of the situation. She did not seem shocked, which, I admit, did shock me. She did say that the doctor would more than likely back whatever this nurse said as they "always back each other." They are not romantically involved but they go back about 14 years and have covered for each other all along. He is somewhat reckless and gets into trouble frequently. This community is very small and he is the only doctor in his specialty here and the hospital and community want to keep him here. He threatens to quit and move off every 6 months or so which would close our unit down. He's not likely to leave at this point in his career but he has them convinced. The NM told me that this nurse has been "the bane of my career but there's nothing I can do" She said if I wanted to report this she would try to support me but she felt that it could come down more on me. She then told me of a laundry list of issues she has in dealing with this nurse including daily tardies (up to an hour), repeated call-ins, issues with other departments, etc. So it sounds as it's a no brainer that if I stir this crap pot the stink will stick more to me. I told the NM that I may have to leave if that is what the culture is here and she said "I hope not, you are an excellent nurse and we're happy to have you, and we've lost too many because of things like this. I can't promise you it will get any better but it certainly won't if you leave." How's that for a guilt trip? Anyway I've decided to decrease my hours to part-time and the NM said she would schedule me on a separate rotation from the nurse in question. For now I will bide my time.
  6. Visit  SDR2015 profile page
    #70 0
    Wow! I say go after the bigger fish and report the physician to the State Boards. He is allowing the nurse to practice beyond her scope of practice. She has no business doing that unless she is an APRN. They are both a threat to the community.
  7. Visit  NRSKarenRN profile page
    #71 0
    Thanks for the advice given. Thread closed as OP made decision.

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