Nurse

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    When I was an EMT, and a CPR instructor, I always took extra classes in order to learn more. One special class was about SIDS. In this case the parents blame themselves, feeling; "If only I had" when in fact there was nothing the parent could have done. So it's important to treat the parent, telling the parent what sometimes happens with SIDS, and it usually happens in the first year of the baby's life. There's an electrical impulse from the brain to the respiratory center and the SA node that hit the AV junction to the Bundle of His in the heart that keeps the baby alive. Sometimes, even if the infant is even laying on its back, this can happen. We call it a short circuit from the brain in order to better explain it to the family so they don't blame themselves.

    A nurse named Florence Nightengale, worked in a hospital where tuberculosis ran rampant. Nothing the medical professionals did solved the excalating number of deaths, until Florence Nightengale thought; "Nothing else is working, so I'm going to open these windows." That amazing feat decreased the number of deaths by numbers. When the government and the organizations that operated hospitals at that time, saw what was happening, more and more sanitariums were built, and, with rest and fresh air along with medication was eventually eradicated.

    Mankind has fought plagues, diseases, and injuries since time began. Throughout time, improvements continued via medical science until modern day. We now have specialists in all fields of medicine, including research and trials to test disease improvement through various methods like surgery, invention of newer high tech devices, robots, scopes, miracle medications, transplants, etc.

    To become specialists in their chosen fields, numerous nurses have become CRNAs (certified registered nurse anesthesists), nurses who teach others to become nurses called nurse educators anywhere from a RN,MSN,ED to a RN, MSN, PHD, ED. CNAs LPNs RNs BSNs, etc.

    There are now specialties in all fields, including emergency nursing, pediatric nursing, geriatric nursing, operating room nursing, emergency room nurses, flight nurses, neonatal nurses with specialties in care for the very ill premature babies which are increasing in the United States.There are also wound care nurses, med nurses, legal nurse specialists, hospice nurses, homecare nursing, certified nursing assistants, nurses in administration, nurse managers, etc. Yes, this is indeed a time when nursing can be a wonderful career, given the many choices there are today.

    There is an ongoing problem however, and it has lasted as long as I have been in the healthcare field (I'm a senior citizen) and longer.That problem is what I will call one upmanship. One upmanship is a term the CNA, LPN, RN, MSN, PHD all people in the field of nursing with varying degrees who tell other nurses they have more education, so they deserve better, or she has been at the place longer so she has more seniority, nurses eating nurses, backbiting, lying, etc, just to make oneself feel better, or so he/she thinks.It's unfortunate this is still an ongoing thing.

    When we went into nursing, our goals were, or should have been to create a care plan that would bring our patients to homeostasis, a term we use to assist the individual, and his/her family members to health, or a peaceful death. In order to do this, the care plan consists of a nursing diagnosis and treatment of human responses to actual or potential health problems. The nurse needs to get and chart results of ordered tests, administer ordered meds, and monitor the outcome of the patient.

    When I was an EMT, and a CPR instructor, I always took extra classes in order to learn more. One special class was about SIDS. In this case the parents blame themselves, feeling; "If only I had" when in fact there was nothing the parent could have done. So it's important to treat the parent, telling the parent what sometimes happens with SIDS, and it usually happens in the first year of the baby's life. There's an electrical impulse from the brain to the respiratory center and the SA node that hit the AV junction to the Bundle of His in the heart that keeps the baby alive. Sometimes, even if the infant is even laying on its back, this can happen. We call it a short circuit from the brain in order to better explain it to the family so they don't blame themselves.

    This is why when medical care, from the administration, to the physician, to the nurse manager, to the other nurses, and CNAs when working correctly, run like a well oiled machine, and people get well faster. Wouldn't it be nice if that would happen.

    I spoke with a nurse specialist once since I'm now disabled, but do keep up with my knowledge via on this website, and reading journals, that I didn't know if I was still able to keep my user name since it does define who I really am. She told me, the same thing I learned in nursing school. "Once a nurse always a nurse, and a nurse is a nurse is a nurse." I know that I love nursing, and if I was able to, I would still be working as one. I hold every one of them, from the student, to the CNA, to whatever position they may hold, may that even be LPN, RN, BSN, MSN, RN PHD in high esteem as long as they don't let their titles go to their heads, and try to down another medical person having the same goal of caring for an individual. That is why no matter how many Letters I had after my name, I would still choose to tell my patients and others as I have for many years now, "I'm a nurse."
    Last edit by Blanca R on Jan 1, '12

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  2. About FranEMTnurse

    From 'PA'; 71 Years Old; Joined Jun '02; Posts: 11,573; Likes: 4,746.

    Read more articles from FranEMTnurse

    8 Comments so far...

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    As far as SIDS is concerned, recently there has been some research showing that the inner or middle ear may play a part.
    FranEMTnurse likes this.
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    Thank you for reminding us what it all is supposed to be about. I teach at a small AD program and our grads are constantly reminded that they "only have a 2 year degree." They are still nurses and they still provide excellent care. Re: letters after our name. I attended an AD program, then BSN, MSN and am about to enter a DNP- the latest "buzz words" in nursing- Doctor of Nursing Practice. Oh yes. I'm still a nurse.
    FranEMTnurse likes this.
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    Quote from oncnursemsn
    Thank you for reminding us what it all is supposed to be about. I teach at a small AD program and our grads are constantly reminded that they "only have a 2 year degree." They are still nurses and they still provide excellent care. Re: letters after our name. I attended an AD program, then BSN, MSN and am about to enter a DNP- the latest "buzz words" in nursing- Doctor of Nursing Practice. Oh yes. I'm still a nurse.
    Thank you for recognizing what I wrote about. It doesn't really matter if we have two or twenty letters after our names unless we are certified specialists. Then of course, we still have to sign RN, don't we. Fran the nurse.
    oncnursemsn likes this.
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    excellent article!

    i hope we keep these in mind Nurses! =)
    FranEMTnurse likes this.
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    I'm just a Nursing student so I don't have those special little letters behind my name yet- but I pray 20 years from now Fran I have the outlook on life that you still hold onto. It is amazing- your perspective- and I just want to be the best and greatest Nurse I can be- I want to help people [as cliche as that sounds]- and all I think about from the time I get up to the time I go to sleep is Nursing and how can I get there and what I need to do to do it. I pray for Gods guidance each and everyday. I work F/t and am a single mom- but I know I can do this and would be an amazing Nurse [no matter what kind]- I just want to get out there and do it! I'm going to shoot for being an RN- I want to work in PED/NICU- but as long as I am a Nurse I will be happy- and I feel I will be doing Gods work...
    Luv,
    Audrey
    Last edit by sirI on Jul 14, '08
    FranEMTnurse likes this.
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    we need nurses like you..
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    Thank You for putting into words what so many people need to hear I am a graduate nurse that has not even received my RN liscensure and I have been blessed to be a part of an oncology unit and if i had to choose those initials or continue to provide care for oncology patient I would hands down everyday choose to be granted just the opportunity to be a small part of oncology care.
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    Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!!!
    I instruct my nursing students to view any setting they work in as a village. All members (including nurses) are part of the team. Each person on this team has equal value. It takes all people working together to help restore the patient back to health. If my students grasp the healthcare team as being a horizontal rather than vertical framework then true teamwork can become a reality in any setting. :wink2:
    I too believe once a nurse always a nurse!!!!
    Last edit by Successfully123 on Aug 3, '08
    oncnursemsn and aca4 like this.


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