Non-traditional therapies in nursing or at home

  1. Here it is, a beautiful Sunday in the midwest, and I'm sitting inside reading a nursing textbook. I must be daft! The textbook is about cultural diversity in nursing and the use of non-traditional therapies such as herbs, massage, aromatherapy, light therapy, reflexology, yoga, homeopathy, healing humor, meditation, acupuncture and acupressure, biofeedback, companion therapy, etc.

    Recently, NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association) added "Energy Field Disturbance" to the list of acceptable nursing diagnoses. Energy Field Disturbance's definition (according to Carpenito) is, "The state in which a disruption of the flow of energy surrounding a person's being results in a disharmony of the body, mind, and/or spirit." This diagnosis is often used in Touch Therapy.

    I don't want a debate on whether or not this is a valid diagnosis or therapies, but rather a discussion about using non-traditional methods of healing. As major organizations such as NANDA begin to recognize non-traditional nursing, I began to think about these kind of therapies. My very traditional doctor's office is located right next door to a RN doing massage therapy. So, my question is: Do you use any of these in your practice or at home? Why? What kind of results do you see? What kind of non-traditional therapies do you use?

    Thanks for participating!
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  2. Poll: Your use of non-traditional therapies as a nurse, student, or healthcare provider:

    • I have a non-traditional therapy practice, or use them at work.

      5.88% 1
    • I use non-traditional therapy (s) at home for myself and my family.

      41.18% 7
    • I am aware of non-traditional therapies, and strive to help my patients practice them when possible.

      52.94% 9
    • I've never used non-traditional therapies, but I'd like to learn more about them.

      17.65% 3
    17 Votes / Multiple Choice
  3. 13 Comments

  4. by   NRSKarenRN
    Have used Therapeutic touch on about 6 individuals who were receptive. All were much calmer and with less pain afterwards. Does it work or just the presence of an interested RN and "therapeutic use of self" to help relax them, can't say but all benefited.
  5. by   cactus wren
    Personally, I use Red Yeast Rice capsules instead of statins, has lowered my cholesertrol well, without any side effects. My ortho doc suggested Chondroitin/Glucosamine for my knees....am now pain free, and hope to keep the ones God gave me for awhile longer. St. Johns Wort is another heb i have taken with good results. At first sign of cold take Echinacea. Have never tried accupuncture, but would. Love a massage......
    I routinely ask my patients about any herbal remedys they take as some can interact badly with Rx.
    Did work with a nurse several years ago who was into auras and healing hands stuff, and I must say on some patients she had good results....One of our surgeons would request her to care for her patients as doc thought she helped.....Sometimes she was way weird though........
  6. by   live4today
    Originally posted by Youda
    ........................the use of non-traditional therapies such as herbs, massage, aromatherapy, light therapy, reflexology, yoga, homeopathy, healing humor, meditation.............
    Hi Youda

    I have tried all of the above along with Karen's suggestion of Touch Therapy with much success on myself. Touch therapy has also worked on patients I have had in the past because they have told me afterwards how much more relaxed they felt.

    I'm for anything 'legal' and 'kosher' in the realm of medicine and nursing. Whatever works......I say......go for it! :kiss
  7. by   MollyMo
    I use herbal medications. I prefer them over manufactured ones. I have used therapeutic touch on patients. It works very well with heart patients to lessen pain and relieve some depression. I go to a chiropractor every Monday and Friday. I get a 15 minute massage before my adjustment. I am a firm believer in chiropractic therapy.
  8. by   Sleepyeyes
    As many of you already know, I use prayer and anointing oil ...
  9. by   live4today
    originally posted by sleepyeyes
    as many of you already know, i use prayer and anointing oil ... :d
    amen sister sleepyeyes!!! me too!!! :kiss :angel2:
  10. by   Youda
    Renee! I don't know why, but I didn't figure you for the type who would use this stuff? I'm so happy to hear it! Sleepyeyes, what kind of anointing oil do you use? Is it a religious oil, or essential oils?

    I regularly use herbal teas, cammomile, peppermint, jasmine, whatever. This week, I'm being my own guinea pig for light therapy at the advice of my doctor who felt that it was effective in relieving depression. So, I started to try some aromatherapy as well. I don't know if there is a scientific or medical basis for it, but the aromatherapy is sure helping with stress and anxiety. I hadn't thought to try anything for high cholesterol! My last lipid profile wasn't the best.

    Once, several years ago, I went to a therapeutic touch practitioner. I felt better for months afterwards.
  11. by   live4today
    Okay Youda......explain yourself.....please??????
  12. by   Youda
    LOL! I didn't mean it in a bad way, Renee, if it sounded like that. I had just read some of your posts from an administrative point of view, and thought you would be more "traditional." It is fun to know that I was wrong in my "stereotype" and that someone I admire (admire from your well-thought out, positive, and balanced responses on allnurses) uses some of the things that I've recently become interested in.
  13. by   Sleepyeyes
    Well, I always prayed for my patients, but I started anointing those who seemed to want it after I went to a conference on the Holy Spirit at my church. We believe in the laying on of hands for healing of physical, mental, and emotional illnesses, as well as for spiritual edification.

    Because all of us are expected to minister in this way to each other, we are allowed to pray and anoint the sick. So I get my anointing oil from my church.

    Some days, I anoint myself before work and pray the Lord will guide me as I work to be the most beneficial for my patients. Then.....awesome things happen!
  14. by   live4today
    Originally posted by Youda
    LOL! I didn't mean it in a bad way, Renee, if it sounded like that. I had just read some of your posts from an administrative point of view, and thought you would be more "traditional." It is fun to know that I was wrong in my "stereotype" and that someone I admire (admire from your well-thought out, positive, and balanced responses on allnurses) uses some of the things that I've recently become interested in.
    :chuckle Now......in SOME aspects of the word TRADITIONAL, I am very much one.......But..., in many other aspects of the way I view life......I am what my close friends and family call Changing like the wind. :chuckle :kiss

    Thank you for appreciating my "administrative" viewpoints on other threads I post on. I guess I can stop teaching, but will always have the "teacher" in me.
  15. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Funny you should start this thread now. I am just beginning the Healing Touch Series of seminars, in hopes one day of gaining certification. I want to bring MUCH more to my practice and daily life and feel like the skills taught there will help me to do this.

    It is interesting to note what is "traditional" in one culture, is considered NON-traditional or "new age" in another. 1000s of so-called "new age" or "complementary" therapies have been used for centuries in other cultures; it begs the question as to what really IS traditional and what is complementary. I guess it depends upon the perspective of the person asking the question, huh?

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