Non-Nurses calling themselves a Nurse - page 3

The school district my child goes to has a CNA in the school clinic, who refers to herself as "The school Nurse". I thought she was either an LVN or RN until last week when she had me come pick up... Read More

  1. by   MissJoRN
    Where ever I've done private duty in PA schools they are "Health aides" or "Health room techs" Actually, even RNs cannot be called "School Nurse" unless they are cetified, here.

    The complete opposite is that I've had teachers refer to me as So-and-so's "aide" Hello? I'm currently suctioning the child and managing a vent... "aide"? Of course, it goes along with some insulting behavior, but that's another thread...
  2. by   ElvishDNP
    In NC it is illegal to use the title 'nurse' unless you have the license. I'm amazed.
  3. by   GingerSue
    doesn't have the right to diagnose or prescribe

    "wingworm"?

    maybe some changes ahead?
  4. by   Batman24
    The most disturbing thing is that she is giving parents a diagnosis. Apparently she has decided to annoint herself a doctor. Yikes.The danger in all of this is that parents who don't know any better might be treating their child for "wingworm" or some other lunacy without getting the child proper diagnosis and medication.

    I wouldn't let this drop. Your child was lucky and will be just fine. Another child might not be and the result could be tragic.
  5. by   kuskwah
    Here's an analogy a fellow school nurse from Colorado uses: "If your child was in the hospital, you would have a fit if the cleaning lady came in the room to give your child their medicine. How is it suddenly 'ok' for an unlicensed person to administer medication in a school?" The National Association of School Nurses is campaigning strongly for a school nurse consultant position at the State Department of Education to help "educate" the educators about how health and education interact, and the importance of addressing health in a safe way, to enhance education. We need registered nurses from all "walks of life" to support this intiative by contacting your state senators and congresspeople. As nurses, we need to support each other!
  6. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from hogan4736
    "wingworm" - That's a new one...others I've heard from "nurses"


    "infantigo"

    "sugar diabetes"

    "O2 stats"
    I personally CRINGE every time I get report on a patient that is "statting in the low 90's". Like they don't know what the abbreviation stands for. Ick.

    Maybe this is petty, but how many people do you know that mispronounce "phenergan"? Seems epidemic here: "phenegran" is most common, along with....wait for it...."finnigan". Although I admit that one was a unit secretary. Still....
  7. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from TazziRN
    "wingworm"........I musta missed that part of the micro lecture on parasites.......or is that parachutes?
    ROFL!
  8. by   RNsRWe
    I just got a Scholastic book order in for my child, and one of the books was "Going to the Dentist" by Mercer Mayer. And wouldn't you know it, as we read together, there were many pages of text and pictures about "the nurse" at the reception desk, "the nurse" taking x-rays, "the nurse" giving the creature something to swish and spit. Of course "the nurse" was nothing of the sort, but we wonder why people get confused?
  9. by   RN BSN 2009
    Quote from TazziRN
    "wingworm"........I musta missed that part of the micro lecture on parasites.......or is that parachutes?



    I agree with Hopeful, you should write a letter to the editor. I recently did that over an issue of student safety at my daughter's high school, after trying repeatedly to reach the principal and then members of the school board. One letter to the editor and all of a sudden the entire board was tripping over themselves trying to call me, and the principal was on the hot seat. Very effective.

  10. by   jjjoy
    Quote from kuskwah
    Here's an analogy a fellow school nurse from Colorado uses: "If your child was in the hospital, you would have a fit if the cleaning lady came in the room to give your child their medicine. How is it suddenly 'ok' for an unlicensed person to administer medication in a school?"
    Not quite the same thing, as I'd imagine that the formal policy is that the aide or secretary would have had some kind of instruction in administering a routine medication to a child with a stable, chronic condition. One could argue that parents aren't qualified to give their children such routine meds, either. Or that a responsible, capable child would need a licensed professional to administer their routine meds for them. I'm not saying that it's okay to not provide licensed personnel in the school. I'm only saying that it's not the same as housekeeping personnel happening into a hospital room and administering a medication.

    I do agree that school districts should provide for licensed school nurses.
  11. by   purplemania
    It is against the law in Texas for anyone to falsely present themselves as a nurse, PERIOD. The District Atty for your area has the right to prosecute. The school district does know better but is trying to get by without paying a nurse. I would contact the school board and the BNE both. As a nurse you have the responsibility to protect your license and your profession. What would you do if someone said they were a doctor but had no license?
  12. by   NeosynephRN
    I had been reading this thread with interest the last couple days...as this is my ds first year in school and I had never even thought about his "nurse" not really being a nurse....Then I go and pick him up today and another mother, who volunteers in our kids room, says to me..."You know "A"...I say sure...well she had a seizure in class today...they called her mom and had her come pick her up!! WAIT...WHAT!!!! She has a new onset seizure..no history...and they did not call 911...seriously!! If that girl had seized on the way to the hospital in her mom's car...ohhhh I cannot imagine!!! So I also get a note today from the "Nurse"...or Health Associate...whatever that is...I have to do some e-mailing and find out the credentials of this person that is making health decisions for my child while he is at school!!!!
  13. by   kuskwah
    Quote from jjjoy
    Not quite the same thing, as I'd imagine that the formal policy is that the aide or secretary would have had some kind of instruction in administering a routine medication to a child with a stable, chronic condition. One could argue that parents aren't qualified to give their children such routine meds, either. Or that a responsible, capable child would need a licensed professional to administer their routine meds for them. I'm not saying that it's okay to not provide licensed personnel in the school. I'm only saying that it's not the same as housekeeping personnel happening into a hospital room and administering a medication.

    I do agree that school districts should provide for licensed school nurses.
    I think you are assuming that the secretary, etc., does have training. Or the reverse, that the housekeeper doesn't have training. As for the statement about parents not being qualified to give their own children medications...unfortunately might be true in some cases. My point is, people all want their children to be in a safe environment in school. There may be a delegated person at a school who has had some training in medication administration, but thier knowledge of the pathophysiology of a chronic illness is, most likely, nil. Their knowledge of drug interactions, half life, side effects, etc., is also compromised. Our districts are asking people who are not nurses, and never intended to be nurses, to take a huge liability into their hands when administering medications without a license. Parents are taking a big risk by assuming that the person giving the medication is a nurse. The liability issue is huge. And it only takes one student to prove a point. Take Utah as an example. The legislature in Utah just approved $1million dollars for school districts to hire additional school nurses. While this isn't nearly enough $ to meet the needs of the students, it's much better than the current ratio of one school nurse for (sometimes) 8 to 10 thousand kids. School nurses in Utah have been advocating for this increase for a number of years. Guess what happened? One student in one school in one town used her inhaler repeatedly (after being set in the hallway by a delegated non-licensed person) because she was young, scared and couldn't breathe. She eventually passed out and ended up in the hospital. Her mother was very, very vocal and instrumental in getting legislators and school districts to listen and pay attention. If that child had died...the cost of the liability to the school district would have paid that $1 million many times over.

    Sorry, stepping down from my soapbox.....

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