No Takers

  1. Hi everyone!
    I don't understand if there is in fact a nursing shortage...why can't I find a job? Have done 2 hosp. interviews, and no call backs. Could it be that my exp. in LTC doesn't qualify
    me for hosp. position? How unfair, can't even give me a chance? I do want to try nursing in a hospital setting, but it looks like its going to be a struggle to find a job. Go figure. Puzzles me to the max. Mon. will be speaking with yet another hosp. to set up interview. i do believe I have done things right. you know...dress appropiately, thank you cards, etc. This ia kinda getting me down. good thing hubby can support me for awhile, but I really do want to work. Any suggestions???
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   MollyJ
    Kayzee
    You could go back and ask the last two people who interviewed you why they didn't consider you for hire. Would take chutzpah but it might give you some answers.

    If you know a nurse with middle management experience, you could do a mock interview with her and let her critique your performance.

    Various folks have posted here about interview prep. You could review those or start a thread of your own.

    Be sure not to sell yourself short. Don't emphasize what you don't know about hospital nursing. Do emphasize how LTC made you a better evaluator of subtleties ("I can do a good assessment with someone using my eyes and ears and I am not so reliant on technology." But be willing to tell them that you are willing to learn more technology or how you have comfortably coped with technology in the LTC.)

    Pay attention to the basics of good interview technique:

    arrive a few minutes early
    dress nicely but not too overdone
    no gum
    be attentive to what the interviewer says and respond to it
    make eye contact with the interviewer
    have a firm but not bone-crushing handshake
    watch your body language: sit up straight in the chair, legs crossed only at the ankle, lean slightly forward to stay engaged in the conversation, no slouching and again good eye contact (not an eye lock).
    be prepared to sell yourself as a nurse able to make the transition to acute care. Don't lie, but do be willing to share one or two anecdotes when you arose to an acute situation and were comfortable with it.
    be prepared to talk about your strengths and weaknesses. You can either mention a weakness that is a strength, "willingness to go the extra mile" as mentioned on this BB elsewhere OR you can talk about a weakness and how you compensate or would be willing to compensate. (I would be willing to do continuing ed in this area. I use notes to remind myself of important tasks.)

    Good luck. You can do it. Others can post interview pointers.
  4. by   Mkue
    mollyj's advice was excellent.

    kayzee maybe think of some questions to ask at the end of the interview, when the interviewer asks "do you have any questions" that might help to let them know you are really interested in the position.

    also, with nursing is it appropriate to send a thank you letter right after the interivew? what could it hurt?

    eye contact is very important, good posture... etc..

    good luckyou can do it !!

    :angel2:
  5. by   aimeee
    Not sure why you are leaving LTC but be sure not to say negative things about your current situtation or employers. Focus on the positive things you may have done to overcome difficult situations in LTC and the lessons you have learned there which will carry over to acute care (good listening and observation skills, time management, ability to deal with patients with dementia etc.)
  6. by   Love-A-Nurse
    originally posted by mollyj
    kayzee
    you could go back and ask the last two people who interviewed you why they didn't consider you for hire. would take chutzpah but it might give you some answers.

    if you know a nurse with middle management experience, you could do a mock interview with her and let her critique your performance.

    various folks have posted here about interview prep. you could review those or start a thread of your own.

    be sure not to sell yourself short. don't emphasize what you don't know about hospital nursing. do emphasize how ltc made you a better evaluator of subtleties ("i can do a good assessment with someone using my eyes and ears and i am not so reliant on technology." but be willing to tell them that you are willing to learn more technology or how you have comfortably coped with technology in the ltc.)

    pay attention to the basics of good interview technique:

    arrive a few minutes early
    dress nicely but not too overdone
    no gum
    be attentive to what the interviewer says and respond to it
    make eye contact with the interviewer
    have a firm but not bone-crushing handshake
    watch your body language: sit up straight in the chair, legs crossed only at the ankle, lean slightly forward to stay engaged in the conversation, no slouching and again good eye contact (not an eye lock).
    be prepared to sell yourself as a nurse able to make the transition to acute care. don't lie, but do be willing to share one or two anecdotes when you arose to an acute situation and were comfortable with it.
    be prepared to talk about your strengths and weaknesses. you can either mention a weakness that is a strength, "willingness to go the extra mile" as mentioned on this bb elsewhere or you can talk about a weakness and how you compensate or would be willing to compensate. (i would be willing to do continuing ed in this area. i use notes to remind myself of important tasks.)

    good luck. you can do it. others can post interview pointers.
    excellent advise!
  7. by   rachel h
    Hang in there- you will get hired! It might be difficult right now because a lot of people just graduated and hospitals hired a ton of new grads and now have to put them through orientation. (Like me ) At the hospital I was just hired at I had to wait two months out of school to start because they could hire only so many nurses at a time to go through orientation. Good luck- I'm sure you'll find something soon.

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