No Parking, Yes Problem!

  1. I'm a pediatric home care nurse. One of my patients lives in a neighborhood where there was only one street that isn't permit-parking only. Well, *was*, past tense. Now that street is permit only; they notified everyone with a tiny, 14-16pt font plain-white-paper sign taped on a basketball court fence beneath a much larger ad for a job fair. Yes I got a ticket and yes I'm slightly miffed! Could probably successfully contest it (since it violates the requirement that the sign must be prominent enough for a reasonable person to notice it, and I've got pics. It's illegible unless one is within 1-2 feet of the sign) but it's not worth it for $40.

    But that's not really what I'm most concerned about. There is now nowhere legal for me to park within a mile of this patient's home. I am 100% serious. Commercial lots are tow zones for non-customers, now every street requires residency permit, and some main streets have strictly enforced 1 hour parking limits that carry even heftier fines. The patient's landlord will not give me a visitor's permit.

    This child is medically fragile and I'm with him for 7.5 hours per shift. I go to school with him, it's the only way he can be "mainstreamed", which is extremely appropriate for him especially since he is cognitively intact.

    It is too expensive and impractical to always use Uber, and Public Transportation is also impractical. I need my car because I need my supplies.

    This city does not issue permits to anyone aside from residents according to their website. Would it be worthwhile to give them a call? Don't want to say what city for privacy reasons but would be willing to answer that if it was needed.

    Has anyone ever been in this situation? How did you resolve it?
    •  
  2. 33 Comments

  3. by   meanmaryjean
    The patient's landlord needs a visit from the police.
  4. by   dishes
    The patient's parents should write a letter to their city hall representative and explain that the parking situation is impacting their child's ability to receive nursing care.
  5. by   xoemmylouox
    What does your employer suggest? Surely it is not up to you to find the solution. The parents need to contact the mayors office ASAP, not via letter, but via phone.
  6. by   Been there,done that
    You require a medical parking permit. This is up to your agency to obtain.
  7. by   wernicke
    Quote from xoemmylouox
    What does your employer suggest? Surely it is not up to you to find the solution. The parents need to contact the mayors office ASAP, not via letter, but via phone.
    They essentially said that's my problem. They recommend getting the landlord to give me a permit, which I don't have a rat's chance in cat Hell of pulling off unfortunately.
  8. by   wernicke
    Quote from Been there,done that
    You require a medical parking permit. This is up to your agency to obtain.
    Unfortunately, my city does not offer those. Surrounding towns do, but the city does not. I actually think a legislation change could be in order. If I am calm and civil about it, which I feel this morning, I wonder if that's doable. Chances are great that lawmakers just haven't thought about this situation. I don't think anyone would deliberately impede a child's ability to receive much-needed nursing care.
  9. by   caliotter3
    When my employers said that parking and parking tickets were my problem, that fact contributed to my decisions to leave two cases. Parking tickets are far too expensive in my area to make it worthwhile to risk receiving one every time I work.
  10. by   wernicke
    Quote from caliotter3
    When my employers said that parking and parking tickets were my problem, that fact contributed to my decisions to leave two cases. Parking tickets are far too expensive in my area to make it worthwhile to risk receiving one every time I work.
    I do think it's sort of insane that cities fine nurses (and others) for going to work. It's not by design but it's a result of poorly-thought-out parking policies. Maybe there should be designated areas for work parking permits or some other regulation, but I do think that municipalities should make rules that take this into account. Otherwise, people who need visiting nurses will suffer because most of us do not make enough money to afford the tickets on a routine basis and would be forced to drop these assignments.
  11. by   morte
    check with the parking authority, I remember a street in the Back Bay that was ALMOST all resident parking, there were, I think four out os about 20 that were not so marked.
  12. by   mmc51264
    I had that problem a lot as a HH aide. I had to time it so that I could use another persons parking place. Sometimes, my client would get permission from a neighbor. It's a true PITA.
  13. by   wernicke
    Quote from mmc51264
    I had that problem a lot as a HH aide. I had to time it so that I could use another persons parking place. Sometimes, my client would get permission from a neighbor. It's a true PITA.
    Unfortunately, even if I get permission from the owner of the parking space, the landlord will still have my car towed. Visitors are SOL, he has made that clear. He's a real piece of work.
  14. by   Cat365
    I would tell your employer and the family that due to your inability to legally park you regretfully must drop that client. If they want you they will have to obtain a visitors permit or other legal solution.

close