No Nursing Shortage At The Present Time - page 5

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

68,300 Views | 340 Comments

I am assured that some of you are reading this and saying to yourselves, "Duh! This topic is old hat. We already know there's a glut of nurses in many parts of the country, so why are you writing about this?" Here is my reason... Read More


  1. 1
    Just an example of how out of touch some academics are. Don't listen to their advice.
    CNA1991 likes this.
  2. 1
    Quote from wildcatfanrn
    i'm one of those extremely stale grads, circa 2008. i don't consider myself unemployable, just can't get an interview to sell myself. i've gone back to school to get that covetted bsn and try to keep up to date on ce's and go to local nursing association meetings in the areas of interest. networking has been a bust since everyone i've met work for one hospital system and can't seem to get you an in. i even met the asst nurse manager for my "dream" unit, she had me email me her resume to forward to the manager...nada. now i am applying out of my home state again in hopes that somewhere i can get something, even though i cannot really afford to relocate.
    did i misunderstand your post or did you say you graduated nursing school in 2008, can't get a job and don't see that as a sign of not being employable?
    Szasz_is_Right likes this.
  3. 7
    I have the need to vent-
    1. At age 56, I am a Baby Boomer. I do not consider this retirement age, old age or elderly!!!! unless one is very wealthy, like your CEO's but that is not me. I have a bankruptcy to pay off and 20 more years of mortage payments and ZERO for retirement except what ever social security is, which is not a kings ransom. So please stop posting that there is going to be this mass exodus of "the baby Boomers" like it is going to be the biggest anticipated funeral of all man kind- I am very offended!!!! I would also like to add- I am no one's Grandparent!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I totally resent the sentiment- "Get out. Should retire. It's my turn." Save those sentiments for your parents- who probably encourage such entitlement. They may appreciate them- I don't. It is rude, offensive and obnoxious- like passing gas in public., or the 5 year old brat I heard screaming in the waiting room today telling a stranger adult to "SHUT UP" and his young mother not correcting him- whoopie another generation of entitlement.

    2. There are nurses( alot of nurses) out there who have been employed in the same job for years that do not realize how hard it is to find a job these days for the young nurse and the old. Forget educating the Doctors. We have to educate our own who are clueless.
    Last edit by kcmylorn on Jul 3, '12
    CNA1991, IndianaHH, applewhitern, and 4 others like this.
  4. 3
    No 56 isn't retirement age but baby boomers are a range from 45 to 66. Your firmly in the middle. I don't say it's wrong to state that this generation is gearing up to retire. Obviously the older members will retire first IF they can. But we're not kicking you out the door yet ;O unless you want us to. Though realistically some will retire; some will not. Some will cut back; some will not. Some will get sick and injured and have to leave nursing and some will not.

    Though the real true statement is some of the workforce will leave when their financial situation allows them to do so.

    If you could retire would you?
    silenced, Fiona59, and DizzyLizzyNurse like this.
  5. 5
    Quote from marcos9999
    This is what really worries me. I see these wannabe nurses flocking to nursing programs ready to shell out big money and years of toiling in nursing school. All of this fueled by the propaganda such "nursing shortage" "recession proof profession" and little they know that once the money is paid, diplomas received most of them will not get jobs and are tossed to the wolves with no one to ask for help. I feel like the city or the consumers protection department should intervene and not let schools get away with false advertisement.
    There was a recent suit filed by grads of several law schools; they claimed they were deceived and lured into attending law school and given false hope for employment. The suit was tossed. The law schools maintained the students should have been aware of their chances of finding employment, and should have researched the market prior to applying and plunking down all that money and wasting all that time. Sound familiar?
    CNA1991, silenced, not.done.yet, and 2 others like this.
  6. 4
    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    If you could retire would you?
    I'm 56, too. And the answer in my case is **hellyeah**
    silenced, KeyMaster, Fiona59, and 1 other like this.
  7. 8
    Quote from nursel56
    I'm 56, too. And the answer in my case is **hellyeah**
    Ok so when all the baby boomer nurses win the lottery there will be a shortage again. Problem solved. Lotto tickets for everyone.
    silenced, ALavallee, jamie.glaze, and 5 others like this.
  8. 2
    Quote from Patti_RN
    There was a recent suit filed by grads of several law schools; they claimed they were deceived and lured into attending law school and given false hope for employment. The suit was tossed. The law schools maintained the students should have been aware of their chances of finding employment, and should have researched the market prior to applying and plunking down all that money and wasting all that time. Sound familiar?
    Considering how expensive law school and supposedly how smart you are supposed to be to get in then I agree somewhat with the judge.

    Disclosure: I was a law student in NZ and I dropped out as soon as I realized that I'd need to be in the top 25% of my class to be able to get any kind of a job as a lawyer. Luckily I was only OOP about $1500NZD. You can go direct entry into law school back home so I had only just finished high school but even I could see the writing on the wall.
    nursel56 and Fiona59 like this.
  9. 2
    This is why I consider myself to be very lucky to have a full time job to go to...even if it's in a rural town in the middle of nowhere. But I've heard that with some experience, more jobs open up for you...hope that's true! I hope to get a job back in the city soon.
    nursel56 and Fiona59 like this.
  10. 7
    Home health and hospice. Yeah, uh. Here's your warning.

    Most new grads working will be working home health or hospice. Some are well established, have the majority of RNs hospital experienced, have a complete training program for the new grads as well as experienced nurses they take on, and have well established clinical infrastructure.

    Unfortunately a growing majority are nothing like this. They are run by some seriously sleazy people. You will find that their nurses are 99% new grads. No training except for how to use their EMR. If you research you can find out the background of their ownership. Beautiful websites, heavy marketing - often stuff they advertise is getting to meet a star before you die stuff... and they get business this way. You will see them advertise constantly for RNs. Your director of nursing might be a new grad. You deal with patients - management does not - teflon.

    So sadly, just think about all the new RNs who continue with these companies because they need the money. Years go by and they can never leave. With a new job they will be expected to have learned from their years working as RNs. The legit home health and hospice companies know this and will not hire them, so even making a lateral move is nearly impossible.

    I have several friends in this trouble.
    silenced, not.done.yet, jamie.glaze, and 4 others like this.


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