No Nursing Shortage At The Present Time - page 31

I am assured that some of you are reading this and saying to yourselves, "Duh! This topic is old hat. We already know there's a glut of nurses in many parts of the country, so why are you writing about this?" Here is my reason... Read More

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    I agree with a previous poster that schools advertising should be sanctioned for false advertisement and closed down until the supply is less than the demand. It is crooked practice for Universities to be the ones to gain while the students end up unemployable. Additionally, many new nursing grads enter the profession with an entitled attitude and want all of the day jobs. They have to realize that other seasoned and experienced nurses have earned those positions and that they are going to have to be willing to work any shift. Hey we have all been there! From what I have read, community nursing is the one way to go. Work home health. It is great experience!! Nursing is nursing no matter who the patients are. Work in a nursing home to get experience. It all helps I can guarantee you that. Do not feel like you are 'too good or too educated to wipe butt' as an RN. It is all part of the job. Be willing to start anywhere! Unfortunately administrations are not providing RNs with the help needed in patient care like they should so we are overloaded with patient responsibilities. However, due to the fact that CNAs/UAPs cannot take doctors orders and give medications, these healthcare workers are desperately needed so that the RN can do his or her duties. We cannot do it all.......But I pray that nurses start being utilized because they are needed.....big business just doesn't want to pay for our very valuable services.....

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  2. 2
    Quote from nursegirl2001
    I agree with a previous poster that schools advertising should be sanctioned for false advertisement and closed down until the supply is less than the demand. It is crooked practice for Universities to be the ones to gain while the students end up unemployable. Additionally, many new nursing grads enter the profession with an entitled attitude and want all of the day jobs. They have to realize that other seasoned and experienced nurses have earned those positions and that they are going to have to be willing to work any shift. Hey we have all been there! From what I have read, community nursing is the one way to go. Work home health. It is great experience!! Nursing is nursing no matter who the patients are. Work in a nursing home to get experience. It all helps I can guarantee you that. Do not feel like you are 'too good or too educated to wipe butt' as an RN. It is all part of the job. Be willing to start anywhere!
    Entitlement is NOT the reason new grads can't find jobs.

    When I was an unemployed new grad (2008), I was willing to start anywhere, at any facility, on any shift. Home Health wanted a year of experience. Nursing homes wanted a year of experience, and most were train wrecks. Hospitals said straight out "no new grads." I was turned down by 1-star nursing homes (I checked). I finally found my first job 10 months after graduation. Some new grads were still unemployed 2 years after graduation.
    silenced and DizzyLizzyNurse like this.
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    Sometimes entitlement IS THE REASON new grads don't get jobs. I was replying to another poster's comment. This may not be the reason all of the time but sometimes it is......
  4. 2
    Quote from nursegirl2001
    I agree with a previous poster that schools advertising should be sanctioned for false advertisement and closed down until the supply is less than the demand. It is crooked practice for Universities to be the ones to gain while the students end up unemployable. Additionally, many new nursing grads enter the profession with an entitled attitude and want all of the day jobs. They have to realize that other seasoned and experienced nurses have earned those positions and that they are going to have to be willing to work any shift. Hey we have all been there! From what I have read, community nursing is the one way to go. Work home health. It is great experience!! Nursing is nursing no matter who the patients are. Work in a nursing home to get experience. It all helps I can guarantee you that. Do not feel like you are 'too good or too educated to wipe butt' as an RN. It is all part of the job. Be willing to start anywhere! Unfortunately administrations are not providing RNs with the help needed in patient care like they should so we are overloaded with patient responsibilities. However, due to the fact that CNAs/UAPs cannot take doctors orders and give medications, these healthcare workers are desperately needed so that the RN can do his or her duties. We cannot do it all.......But I pray that nurses start being utilized because they are needed.....big business just doesn't want to pay for our very valuable services.....

    Home health requires experience, at least around me. I worked as a CNA for almost 3 years, so no I didn't believe I was too good to wipe butt. I also worked as an LPN for 8 years prior to finishing RN school. I couldn't get hired at my own facility that sent me to school and paid for the whole thing because in their 13 facilities they didn't have a single opening for an RN!!! Then when they needed me PRN they wanted me to be the RN supervisor of the whole building while being the LPN on the floor (the ONLY nurse on a floor of 43 residents. You know do both jobs for $1.50 extra an hour. I had to do it for a while because there was NOTHING else. The Catholic Health system owns 4 out of 6 area hospitals...and they had 1 job they would offer a new grad. The others wanted BSN, which I did not have. I wasn't going to leave my current LTC position that was FT to make less in another LTC place and only be able to get PT. I finally secured a FT LTC position in a job connected to a hospital and it closed before I was done with orientation....so I got bumped. Into a position I had no business being in, alone on a floor that I had NO training for. Luckily I got bumped again, this time in a PT hospital position. I can't even get FT.

    I've put in years in healthcare and I couldn't get an RN job for 9 months, just to get bumped continuously. This is reality. No entitlement here. And I got pretty sick of hearing I "must" be doing something wrong to have such a hard time finding a job.
    silenced and Not_A_Hat_Person like this.
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    Quote from Not_A_Hat_Person
    Entitlement is NOT the reason new grads can't find jobs.
    Quote from nursegirl2001
    Sometimes entitlement IS THE REASON new grads don't get jobs.
    The reasons for the inability of a new grad to land a job are too numerous to list.

    The new grad who lives in a geographic area that is saturated with too many nurses and too few jobs will face an uphill battle trying to secure employment, even in settings such as nursing homes, home health, private duty, and clinics. Let's face it: less new grad programs have been available since the economic downturn of '08. This current economic situation has not treated many recent college graduates well, and nursing has not been immune.

    On the other hand, I have met the occasional self-entitled new grad who refuses to work any job other than their 'dream spot' in the ER, L&D, ICU, pediatrics, trauma, etc. They will hold out for a year or two, refuse to work in specialties that they deem 'undesirable,' and then complain that they have been unemployed for more than one year. Beggars cannot be choosers in this day and age.

    Therefore, it goes both ways. . .
    not.done.yet and Rose_Queen like this.
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    I wish that you guys would stop sending me these stupid replies. Many of the grads do have entitled attitudes although maybe not all. Such is my experience. Those of you who do not don't bother to reply.....
  7. 1
    Studies have shown that it is more financially feasible to hire more nurses so that we have adequate staffing levels vs. risking the liability of NOT having enough staff and causing problems; yet, nurses all over the place are understaffed and overworked. I work on a progressive care unit where the ratio is supposed to be 1:4. We do have some very stable patients that are just there for observation and are prepping to go to for a stress or a cath the next day....but we also have some pretty unstable patients. We get patients with drips, some we titrate. Regardless, these patients need more monitoring which is why they are admitted to our floor. But because of staffing and the hospital budget, we're starting to take 5-6 patients each.

    But it's not just our floor. It's the whole hospital. Med-surg ratios are typically 1:6 but now they are finding themselves taking up to 8 or 9 patients...ICU nurses will be taking 3 patients instead of the 1:2, sometimes all three of those patients are on vents!

    And again, the shortage comes from the lack of staff! And instead of hiring new nurses, they start floating us all over. I got floated to postpartum a couple of weeks ago and I am a PCU nurse!!! I was doing OB-GYN assessments. I haven't stepped foot on that type of unit since my OB-GYN rotation in nursing school which was like 3-4 years ago. The nurses I was working with that night were very helpful but still. They are trying to make up for short-comings by floating staff elsewhere, but in turn that either makes our unit short-staffed or we get nurses who cannot work with certain medications (we get a lot of med-surg RNs floated to my floor and they're not supposed to push meds like hydralazine, labetalol, metoprolol or work with drips like amio, dopamine, NTG, etc...)
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.
  8. 0
    This is a prime example of how the schools are driving the "shortage" hysteria.

    Nursing schools struggle to keep up with demand | TuscaloosaNews.com

    BTW... Whoever that was that responded hit the nail on the head.
  9. 2
    You know what? that is just plain scary ... and these hospitals are putting the RNs at risk for litigation when they send them to a floor that they are not oriented enough to work on. The hospital should orient nurses to the diverse areas of nursing so that they are competent in another discipline and can work confidently. It is time for nurses to raise some you know what ! That just really drives me bonkers. Administration didn't work for those licenses the nurses did !!!
    silenced and turnforthenurseRN like this.
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    Quote from nursegirl2001
    You know what? that is just plain scary ... and these hospitals are putting the RNs at risk for litigation when they send them to a floor that they are not oriented enough to work on. The hospital should orient nurses to the diverse areas of nursing so that they are competent in another discipline and can work confidently. It is time for nurses to raise some you know what ! That just really drives me bonkers. Administration didn't work for those licenses the nurses did !!!
    Yup. Believe me, I wasn't thrilled. They also trie floating me to nursery and I have NO nursery experience what so ever except in clinical which was again, 3-4 years ago. They do need to give proper orientation if they are expecting nurses to get floated to these highly specialized areas, but again, that costs more money and in this recession I doubt hospitals will be doing that.


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