No Nursing Shortage At The Present Time - page 3

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

68,231 Views | 340 Comments

I am assured that some of you are reading this and saying to yourselves, "Duh! This topic is old hat. We already know there's a glut of nurses in many parts of the country, so why are you writing about this?" Here is my reason... Read More


  1. 8
    There is no shortage of licensed nurses, to be sure. I will point out, however, that there is a substantial number of licensed nurses, both new and otherwise, who have little business being in the acute-care business.

    I would prefer to see both the entry requirements and the licensure requirements raised... with the presumed result that the number of new licenses granted would drop.

    While I work with some fabulous nurses, I also work with some that I wouldn't let within ten feet of any but the most stable of patients... and sometimes not even then.

    It appears, however, that even separating the wheat from the chaff, that there are still far too many new grads pumped out of the system each semester.
    silenced, Szasz_is_Right, RNsRWe, and 5 others like this.
  2. 6
    Quote from chuckster
    So what is the ultimate fate of those 36% (or 43% in CA) of RN's who have been unable to find nursing jobs for a year or more? Conventional nursing wisdom says that new nurses have a "golden year" after graduation in which to find jobs or risk being unemployable as RN's. Could it be that more than one-third (or apparently more than 40% in some areas) of nursing students are essentially out of luck in terms of their career choice? If so, given that the actual cost to train a new RN generally significantly exceeds the tuition and fees paid by the student, we are are squandering a huge amount of money. That however pales in comparison to the staggering waste of human potential such a scenario represents.

    What will these "non-practicing" RN's do in the long run if a career in nursing is no longer open to them? Can it truly be the case with such large - and growing - numbers of trained but unemployed RN's out there, that there is truly a nursing shortage looming? Are we as a country willing to accept a "lost generation" of unemployable nurses?
    The real truth is that no one knows what will happen in the future. One must remember that until 2008 hospitals were still giving out sign up bonuses. It all changed in the course of 3 months. One thing I know about health care is that it has an unstable quality by nature, what is one way in one moment is the opposite in the next. A patient is doing well now and a moment later there is a crisis. The fundamentals of health care are still in place and people get sick unexpectedly and census can switch on a moment's notice; the population is growing and major urban centers are opening new facilities. You have to look at the big picture. Here's another scenario (quite possible too). Here I'm predicting the future but this is also based on past crisis which had similar conditions. In a couple of years from now...

    Let's pretend the economy get better, not just a little but actually a lot better. Now the retired / one day a week nurses who showed up to work when the economy tanked leave just as they came. Quickly. Along with them the "about to retire" nurses will leave, those who were just hanging in there. The other possible group to leave is the burned out nurses who have been grilled during the time when hospitals had the upper hand and forced them to work harder because they could. So if that happens we'll be back to prior 2008 when staffing nurses was not exactly easy but there's something new here. We are suddenly back to a nursing shortage but worst because 80% of nurses with experience are at retiring age, so even a small percentage loss of these 80% is significant. To make matters worse only a limited amount of new nurses have been trained for the past 6 years. This problem could be aggravated also by the dismantling of systems such as foreign nurse job network, and travel nurses, yes they would quickly be back but it takes some time. Many new grads went into other areas of health care and are not returning others left the profession entirely. Yes there are many new grads out there but how long does it take to really train a nurse until they are safe? At least one year, two is best.

    In the other side of the battle field are the increased census produced by the new patients who are newly employed citizens with their health insurance who have accumulated a few health issues and now need urgent care. Let's not forget the baby boomers which were not so bad a few years ago but now are really beginning to show up. Last but not least is the newly implemented Health Insurance Exchanges Obamacare which by now are full steam ahead producing millions on never insured before patients and many are train wrecks. I have spoken with many senior nurses who think this is very possible scenario.
    Last edit by marcos9999 on Jul 3, '12
    silenced, itsmejuli, NoonieRN, and 3 others like this.
  3. 7
    marcos, I get where you are coming from, but there is the part about how no government is going to fully be able to control what corporate healthcare decides to do. Lots of businesses today are very very cash heavy - but still they refuse to hire. They have figured how to skate by putting employees and patients at huge risk and are now very comfortable doing so. In other words, lots of companies are now dancing with the devil and they all think it's a blast. It's no longer a pride thing to run a good outfit. The execs are living better than ever before. It works for them, but not for current employees or those begging for jobs.

    There is not a thing you can do to get a huge hospital network to hire - unless it's mandated ratios nation-wide. There is nothing on the table to make that happen. Remember, these large healthcare networks have lawyer think tanks working their butts off trying to get the next profit angle. If there ever was a mandate, they'd retaliate by reducing wages to poverty level for all (there will always be retaliation).
    brandy1017, Lovely_RN, KeyMaster, and 4 others like this.
  4. 3
    I also agree with ♪♫ in my ♥. But ADN/BSN/MSN means nothing in reality.

    Make the NCLEX case-based in part. Make that test a knock down drag out test, with some pathophysiological based written essays about the disease process. Also, how about: "Given such and such a diagnosis and s/s, the physician has prescribed the following medications. Describe each medication's complete pharmacological impact on the patient (physiological pathways and therapeutic effect targeted and pitfalls nursing should be watchful for). - or something of the like.

    Doesn't matter ADN/BSN/MSN - you do all have access to, and should be able to take the same test. The information is available to all.

    I thought the NCLEX was very easy> I was disgusted.
    Hygiene Queen, Aurora77, and nursel56 like this.
  5. 1
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    There is no shortage of licensed nurses, to be sure. I will point out, however, that there is a substantial number of licensed nurses, both new and otherwise, who have little business being in the acute-care business.

    I would prefer to see both the entry requirements and the licensure requirements raised... with the presumed result that the number of new licenses granted would drop.

    While I work with some fabulous nurses, I also work with some that I wouldn't let within ten feet of any but the most stable of patients... and sometimes not even then.

    It appears, however, that even separating the wheat from the chaff, that there are still far too many new grads pumped out of the system each semester.
    Good idea in theory (if a little judgemental!), but I am going to quote another poster from a different thread, who also made a good point...

    "No educated professional with a hard-won BSN or MSN is going to want to wipe butt."
    pinkishlimegreen likes this.
  6. 2
    Where I live, I noticed that the new grad RNs being hired are internal hires.
    silenced and Mom To 4 like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from mommyof3girls
    This is depressing news as I prepare to enter nursing school.
    same here...lets hope things change by the time we graduate.
  8. 6
    Okay, I'll add another theory (though it is not mine originally by any means)

    There never was a shortage, not in the last couple of decades anyway. There was at one time a shortage of nurses willing to work in the conditions that were available. Many of them changed their minds quickly when their spouses suddenly didn't have good jobs. "Heck, I can always go full-time at my hospital!"

    What changed a few years ago was that we stopped the natural out-flow of nurses from the job market, the disillusioned, the now well-married, the new moms. All these nurses didn't leave like the usually do. Also the previously mentioned ready-to-retire nurses that are putting it off due to the financial situation.

    I'm pretty sure that in 2020 we will be in a world of hurt for nurses. We will continue to have these crazy fluctuations as long as nursing has this huge population of nurses that sit on the sidelines. In 2020, when the shortage hits, (I'm pretty sure it will) the powers that be will have to find ways to coax the nurses that are choosing not to work back into the work force.

    But the real problem is that we never did have a real nursing shortage.
    lovelylady3, CNA1991, anotherone, and 3 others like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from TiffyRN
    Okay, I'll add another theory (though it is not mine originally by any means)

    There never was a shortage, not in the last couple of decades anyway. There was at one time a shortage of nurses willing to work in the conditions that were available. Many of them changed their minds quickly when their spouses suddenly didn't have good jobs. "Heck, I can always go full-time at my hospital!"

    What changed a few years ago was that we stopped the natural out-flow of nurses from the job market, the disillusioned, the now well-married, the new moms. All these nurses didn't leave like the usually do. Also the previously mentioned ready-to-retire nurses that are putting it off due to the financial situation.

    I'm pretty sure that in 2020 we will be in a world of hurt for nurses. We will continue to have these crazy fluctuations as long as nursing has this huge population of nurses that sit on the sidelines. In 2020, when the shortage hits, (I'm pretty sure it will) the powers that be will have to find ways to coax the nurses that are choosing not to work back into the work force.

    But the real problem is that we never did have a real nursing shortage.
    Tiffany, you make a really good and interesting point. Different way of looking at the issue and - for my sake (nursing student) - I HOPE you're right!!
  10. 2
    "No educated professional with a hard-won BSN or MSN is going to want to wipe butt."
    After two baccalaureate degrees, I chose an MSN as my entry into nursing. While wiping butts is far from my favorite chore, it's all part of the job.

    I guess I challenge your fundamental assertion... though the truth is, it'd be a pretty inefficient system that would have nurses spending much time with basic ADLs, given how much other work cannot be delegated.
    silenced and Aurora77 like this.


Top