No Nursing Shortage At The Present Time - page 28

by TheCommuter 70,881 Views | 340 Comments Senior Moderator

I am assured that some of you are reading this and saying to yourselves, "Duh! This topic is old hat. We already know there's a glut of nurses in many parts of the country, so why are you writing about this?" Here is my reason... Read More


  1. 5
    Quote from PACNWNURSING
    Whats amazing to me is potential future nursing students come on to these forums and ignore all the warnings of no jobs and still pursue nursing... There are other great careers in health care just do some research.
    It is natural for people to believe that they are somehow unique or can do something to set themselves apart from the masses, or that it must be the jobless nurse's fault for not having found a job sooner. Also, the 'Pollyanna Principle' predisposes people to ignore blaring warning signs or cling to small glimmers of hope.
    pyriticsilence, Esme12, elprup, and 2 others like this.
  2. 2
    Even though the nursing shortage as protrayed by the media and the schools is a myth, I can't think of any other health care fields that offer better prospects. I know a few unemployed surg techs, medical assistants, medical technologists, etc. I don't personally know any unemployed nurses. (unless they're not working by choice.)
    pyriticsilence and pnut8377 like this.
  3. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    New York City, New Jersey, southern California, San Francisco Bay area, Philadelphia, and other major metro areas have horrible job markets for new grad RNs and LPNs.
    so you are talking about new grads and LPNs? Is it possible that the hospitals want minimal liability for those who are inexperienced in the work field and they want people to pursue a higher level of education?

    now I am not trying to bash LPN/LVN's I am just assuming this is what the hospitals are after.
  4. 1
    It's not a hospital specific thing. Same thing is happening in home health agencies, LTC's, agency etc.
    elprup likes this.
  5. 3
    Quote from Delgadido
    so you are talking about new grads and LPNs? Is it possible that the hospitals want minimal liability for those who are inexperienced in the work field and they want people to pursue a higher level of education?

    now I am not trying to bash LPN/LVN's I am just assuming this is what the hospitals are after.
    It's that hospitals, etc. want to profit heavily. They are actually cutting nurses in many areas. They, like other business especially these days, have found that there doesn't seem to be any public fall out to keeping as much money as possible and providing minimal product to the buyer - when just about every business in your sector is doing the very same thing. You the buyer, have no other choice but to take what little you are given or stay at home and take care of yourself. So, many healthcare businesses just don't staff adequately. There is no pride in providing a good product anymore (good patient care). Yup it's very dangerous. But nobody cares. So that means very few jobs.
    Esme12, elprup, and DizzyLizzyNurse like this.
  6. 2
    Quote from Delgadido
    so you are talking about new grads and LPNs? Is it possible that the hospitals want minimal liability for those who are inexperienced in the work field and they want people to pursue a higher level of education?

    now I am not trying to bash LPN/LVN's I am just assuming this is what the hospitals are after.
    Both new grad RNs and LPNs are being affected. Any new nurse is very expensive to train and orient, so healthcare facilities would rather hire experienced nurses who can hit the ground running and be ready to work with minimal or no orientation. Management views the situation from a lens of cost effectiveness.

    Although there are hospital job postings for 'new grad RNs,' keep in mind that 500+ people might be applying for a whopping 20 available slots. The competition is fierce these days.
    Esme12 and elprup like this.
  7. 4
    I keep hearing how hospitals want nurses who are experienced...how did they get experienced in the first place? They had to learn and be trained....It seems that this is one of the professions where training is not offered but yet there are so many other unnecessary tasks that new nurses are asked to do which could be replaced by actual training. Is it really necessary to spend weeks going to classes and powerpoints about the CEO and handwashing? Why not take a day and help a nurse who hasn't had IV experience spend a day doing just that so that he/she can become proficient in that area?
  8. 0
    Quote from MochaRN424
    I keep hearing how hospitals want nurses who are experienced...how did they get experienced in the first place? They had to learn and be trained....It seems that this is one of the professions where training is not offered but yet there are so many other unnecessary tasks that new nurses are asked to do which could be replaced by actual training. Is it really necessary to spend weeks going to classes and powerpoints about the CEO and handwashing? Why not take a day and help a nurse who hasn't had IV experience spend a day doing just that so that he/she can become proficient in that area?
    More and more hospitals are making extensive use of staff they already have versus external hiring. Know of several LPNs, aides and others who were *encouraged* to go for their RN by their employer and were hired in that position upon graduation and passing the boards.


    More and more hospitals are viewing new grads as huge and often costly unknowns. Far better to work with someone you know from easily verified work history and references (internal hires) over a "stranger".
  9. 4
    I didn't read the other comments, so sorry if this is a repeat. But I personally think there will be a shortage again. The reason being there are going to be new grads that can't find jobs and move on to other things. Then, their friends/peers will see what happened and see what nurses actually do (I am sorry if it sounds bad but some people act like "I am going to be a nurse and make lots of money; when I am a nurse I will never have to clean a patient, etc"--they don't realize how hard it really is being a nurse) and switch majors and everything. Then, older nurses will retire eventually and you will have the shortage again.

    True story.
    pyriticsilence, NRSKarenRN, pnut8377, and 1 other like this.
  10. 2
    Quote from MochaRN424
    Is it really necessary to spend weeks going to classes and powerpoints about the CEO and handwashing? Why not take a day and help a nurse who hasn't had IV experience spend a day doing just that so that he/she can become proficient in that area?
    In this day and age, the typical new grad is not just lacking in one single skill. Rather, they are lacking numerous procedural skills that are necessary to their success at the bedside. Therefore, the costs to train them to a level of minimal competency is staggering to healthcare facilities.

    There are new grads who have never performed patient care skills such as insertion or discontinuation of Foley catheters, starting peripheral IVs, changing wound dressings, removing sutures, administering oxygen, giving injections, and other basics. These new nurses are in need of costly extended orientations to learn how to function independently because their nursing programs did not cover the most basic of hands-on skills.

    In addition, many new grads resign after accruing the magical one year of experience, which leaves facilities holding the bag after having invested so many dollars and training hours into employees who quit.

    Prior to the Great Recession, hospitals incurred the cost of training masses of new grad nurses because it was 'good for business' and they really did not have any other options. Now that they have more options, they are simply exercising them.
    pyriticsilence and HM-8404 like this.


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