No Nursing Shortage At The Present Time - page 18

I am assured that some of you are reading this and saying to yourselves, "Duh! This topic is old hat. We already know there's a glut of nurses in many parts of the country, so why are you writing... Read More

  1. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    2
    So, in an ironic sort of way, there's an advantage to being a nurse in an undesirable part of the "rust belt".
    anotherone and Not_A_Hat_Person like this.
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  3. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    3
    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    The wrong mix of experience bullet is the worst which is why new grad RN's have to fight so hard to get those new grad hospital position or be pigeonholed as a "B" nurse forever regardless of experience or skill.

    Well thats my fear at least.
    I'm one of those nurses who has the wrong mix of experience.

    I have a total of 6.5 years of experience (4 years as an LVN and became an RN 2 years ago). My experience includes LTC, acute rehab, subacute rehab, and a little psych. I have never worked in an acute care hospital.

    I have been living in Texas for the past 7 years, but have been attempting to return to my home state of California for the past year. However, I will not return without a job offer. I've been submitting applications in the most undesirable cities (Visalia, Bakersfield, Delano, Fresno, etc.), and have even gotten some callbacks, a couple of phone interviews, and one live interview.

    All of my interviewers wanted candidates with at least one year of acute care hospital experience, even for non-hospital positions. My mix of non-acute experience is shooting me in the foot, but I'll continue to press on.
  4. Visit  WildcatFanRN profile page
    0
    of course if you do have acute care experience, but as an lpn it also doesn't count for anything. i know the scope of practice is different for lpn's and rn's but why not accept the fact that i do have some acute care experience and teach me what i need to grow into the rn role.
  5. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    0
    Quote from OCNRN63
    ?????

    !!!!!

    .....
    All posts mentioning popcorn relate to post #95 by malamud69, and the anticipated but never materialized entertaining reactions people expected. Most of them are contained between his post and around #125 or so. I'd requote it but I fear our collective good judgement may not hold up through a second take.
  6. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
    0
    Quote from HM-8404
    A close friend of mine said she thinks many new grads don't stay at their original place of employment because often they are hired and treated like crap because they don't know much and it is hard to shake the "newbie" label. They then go to another job with some experience and are not treated as poorly. Sounds reasonable to me.
    I had an instructor that essentially advised me to leave my first position after one year for that reason. That even if you stayed there for years they would always remember the newbie moments. Of course that implies that the senior staff stick around which might be a good reason to stay.
  7. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
    0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    All of my interviewers wanted candidates with at least one year of acute care hospital experience, even for non-hospital positions. My mix of non-acute experience is shooting me in the foot, but I'll continue to press on.
    Even a couple of the bridge programs here want the LVN's to have 1 year acute experience. Luckily the one I was aiming for changed their position on the matter when it was repeatedly asked "where the badword were they going to get that from"
  8. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    3
    Quote from morte
    This just reinforces the fact that "we" the nursing community is not acting as a "gate keeper" in keeping the graduating number DOWN. If these grads aren't good enough to hire, they shouldn't have been admitted. Supply.and.Demand.
    Things would be different if the profession of nursing functioned as a team, but in fact it often acts like it is a loose federation of warring tribes.
    anotherone, morte, and Burlshoe114 like this.
  9. Visit  Susie2310 profile page
    0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Cannnot speak to everywhere but here in NYC most colleges and universities including CUNY and SUNY programs have prereqs and most instructors are pretty strict about enforcing the fact one is supposed to have the proper background to keep up. If one has barely squeaked by in an 100 level math class there are really only two options; find an *easy* 200 level math class professor or arrange for tutoring/some sort of help.

    Problems come from two fronts but the main thing is that often professors and other students complain about class time being *wasted* explaining and or slowing down for those who cannot keep up to the required level.

    Case in point for my finite math class the professor marched in on day one and clearly told us that if anyone had not either passed the proper placement exams and or taken remedial algerbra classes to leave *NOW*. He was *NOT* going to teach high school/college level intro algerbra so if you fell behind it was your own affair. Since the class was required for graduation and many (like me) left it for our last semester there were few options for those who couldn't keep up.

    Being as that may we still had few girls that piped up with questions such as why (-)+(-) =;s + and or couldn't figure out order of operations. By mid-term exams they were either gone or accepted long as they got a "D" thus passing the class they were good. In the end IIRC some failed.
    Yes, my statistics instructor announced on the first day of class that intermediate algebra with a minimum grade of 'C' was a prerequisite for the class. Like your finite math class, there was no time spent on any algebra topics. On the few occasions that people did raise questions related to algebra, the instructor's tone when she answered made it very clear that if you needed to ask those questions you needed to find another math class.
  10. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
    3
    Honestly I think sometimes Math professors don't want people who are bad at math to be good at math. They just want to teach the mathematically able and get their kicks from having students with aptitude.

    At my college you couldn't enroll into a class unless you had the prereqs the system wouldn't let you.
    silenced, Fiona59, and HM-8404 like this.
  11. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    0
    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    Honestly I think sometimes Math professors don't want people who are bad at math to be good at math. They just want to teach the mathematically able and get their kicks from having students with aptitude.

    At my college you couldn't enroll into a class unless you had the prereqs the system wouldn't let you.
    Every college one has attended has "systems" supposedly to keep persons without the proper prereqs from getting in, and yet every semester you'd find one or two who managed to game the system. The only times it really seems never to happen is in closed majors such as nursing. I mean you cannot register for Med/SurgII until you have completed MedSurg I and even if somehow someone managed the instructors would notice.

    What happened at my last college regarding math classes (and one assumes others) is that a few weeks into the semester the registar's office would send up a list to department chairs of persons without either the proper classes or scores on assement exams. This list was distributed to the affected professors who were in theory supposed to send the named students "downstairs" to sort things out. However removing a student once registered for a class and having gone several weeks into it is much harder than one would think. When these students kept showing up for class the instructor went on about his thing. During break time he would mention their status to the offended students but you can guess how far that got him.

    My fininte math teacher was from China and loved telling us during break that American students were "lazy" at school work. Apparently his classes at school and university consisted of large lecture halls filled with students. When one was called to present work up front if you didn't know it that was that and you failed.

    Think teaching math could be difficult because it seems for those who are really good at it the thing comes almost naturally, and or with the application of hard work. Therefore those deemed not to get "it" are either lazy, stupid or a bit of both.

    Then there are those who feel math has *not* changed over hundreds of years and one needs to wrap one's mind around the subject as it is (use only their formulas and show all work).
    Med dose calc often seems to work this way, well at least those whom must take it with instructors who insist on using the same standard methods/formulas that have been around since the 1980s or before.
  12. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
    1
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Med dose calc often seems to work this way, well at least those whom must take it with instructors who insist on using the same standard methods/formulas that have been around since the 1980s or before.
    Some of those doseage formulas set you up for making mistakes IMHO
    Fiona59 likes this.
  13. Visit  HM-8404 profile page
    3
    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    Honestly I think sometimes Math professors don't want people who are bad at math to be good at math. They just want to teach the mathematically able and get their kicks from having students with aptitude.

    At my college you couldn't enroll into a class unless you had the prereqs the system wouldn't let you.
    I sometimes think teachers don't want too many questions asked simply because they don't know how to teach. They can do the work, put it on the board and work it out, but not actually be able to teach. I had a Cal. professor that was brilliant. He held a PhD. in Mathematics, was retired from the Marshal Space Flight Center (NASA), was one of the Engineers that wrote the National Engineering exam, was as nice a guy as you would ever meet, but he could not teach to save his life. He was too smart for the class he taught. He didn't know how to "dumb it down" for those with out Engineering degrees.
  14. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
    0
    I think when your able to do the problem it makes it harder to figure out all the possible ways it could go wrong.


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