No Nursing Shortage At The Present Time - pg.13 | allnurses

No Nursing Shortage At The Present Time - page 13

I am assured that some of you are reading this and saying to yourselves, "Duh! This topic is old hat. We already know there's a glut of nurses in many parts of the country, so why are you writing... Read More

  1. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    0
    Quote from smartnurse1982
    One more reason I think there is a nursing glut is because the schools are graduating people who don't belong there at all.At my school there were people who graduated with all C's.My school would also curve grades a lot.The students who were more social passed even though they got bad grades and always failed tests.My school always put more emphasis on nursing skills rather than grades,so that the students who did terrible on the class portion but did great in the clinical portion still passed. I know lots of nurses who are great at skills but terrible about giving out correct info or don't know basics about common diseases.Some jobs have wised up though. I would say over 75% of nursing jobs I had applied to in three years have asked for transcripts. This is a recent thing that I read nursing jobs do nowadays to weed out some applicants. I alsocame across a few that ch. eck credit reports
    While one understands your concern take heart in knowing such new grads still must pass both the NCLEX and often the numerous exams facilities administer as part of the hiring process. The pharma exams in particular are proving to be where the wheat is sorted from the chaff so to speak.

    So in general you are right to worry, but know that hospitals and others no longer simply accept the fact one has a license as the last word for being hired anymore.
  2. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    3
    Quote from kcmylorn
    My advise(re: credit reporting , employment applications and crdit cards)- file for banckruptcy- they take those little cards from you right then and there. Then you have to pay every thing in cash. "My lips are sealed" Bankruptcy does have it's privlidges.

    There was a case maybe 2 years ao of an unemployed father( he had custody of his young boys) who was trying to get a job but continued to be turned down due to his poor credit history which was due to his inablity to pay his bills which was due to his unemployment- the catch 22 effect. i think it was with that that companies were forced to not rely so heavily on the the almighty credit report

    I wonder if the transcript thing is not because of the 'language' in some job postings " Must be a graduate of an NLN or AACN accredited school of professional nursing"
    Not sure if you meant the above as joke, but I'd never advise anyone to declare bankruptcy except as a final drastic resort.

    Bad credit is one thing but a bankruptcy on one's credit report can shut doors not only for credit but employment as well for a very long time.

    As for getting rid of credit cards, I shouldn't rush to do that either.

    Credit scores are based on many factors but the main ones are one's credit in relation to income and payment history as well as amount of time the account has been open. While one can have a bad history with an account at the moment, making payments on time and paying down the balance will eventually raise one's credit score. OTHO opening a new account, especially if many are done at once can actually lower your credit score.

    If someone feels they cannot be trusted with having a credit card in their purse, cut the things up and or shred them. Long as the account is open and in good standing the number is still vaild and one can use it in an emergency, well long as it does not require swiping the card. Or, simply report the thing lost and you'll receive another.
    OCNRN63, Not_A_Hat_Person, and koi310 like this.
  3. Visit  Rose_Queen profile page
    4
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Not sure if you meant the above as joke, but I'd never advise anyone to declare bankruptcy except as a final drastic resort.

    Bad credit is one thing but a bankruptcy on one's credit report can shut doors not only for credit but employment as well for a very long time.

    As for getting rid of credit cards, I shouldn't rush to do that either.

    Credit scores are based on many factors but the main ones are one's credit in relation to income and payment history as well as amount of time the account has been open. While one can have a bad history with an account at the moment, making payments on time and paying down the balance will eventually raise one's credit score. OTHO opening a new account, especially if many are done at once can actually lower your credit score.

    If someone feels they cannot be trusted with having a credit card in their purse, cut the things up and or shred them. Long as the account is open and in good standing the number is still vaild and one can use it in an emergency, well long as it does not require swiping the card. Or, simply report the thing lost and you'll receive another.
    Re: Credit cards

    Someone once told me this tip: Put your cards on ice. Literally. As in, put them in a container of water and put it in the freezer. Makes you really think things over as to whether you really need whatever it is you're going to put on the credit card as it thaws out. Beats accumulating a lot of debt you wouldn't have had otherwise!
  4. Visit  lil mac profile page
    0
    Gee...... If there is a nursing shortage, we have a built in excuse for working short handed in almost every area!! Nurses leaving and not being replaced and their positions being eliminated! It is true that a lot of people will become or have become Nurses but how many will stay once reality sinks in? I'm just sayn?????
  5. Visit  BennyRNCA profile page
    1
    I'm not sure about other states, but many may start to follow CA's laws in regards to using anyone credit report as an employment decision, as it was recently declared "illegal".

    If they do run your credit report, they have to give you full disclosure. The exception would be for those working in certain financial fields or law enforcement, whereby one could be swayed by the draw of possible accessible money.

    AB 22 is similar to the laws in six other states: Hawaii, Washington, Oregon, Illinois, Maryland and Connecticut. I supported this legislation and my last credit score was 759, as I was thinking of buying a used car (dealership), but didn't as I decided to run my 12 year Honda into the ground more.
    kcmylorn likes this.
  6. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    1
    Quote from BennyRNCA
    I'm not sure about other states, but many may start to follow CA's laws in regards to using anyone credit report as an employment decision, as it was recently declared "illegal".

    If they do run your credit report, they have to give you full disclosure. The exception would be for those working in certain financial fields or law enforcement, whereby one could be swayed by the draw of possible accessible money.

    AB 22 is similar to the laws in six other states: Hawaii, Washington, Oregon, Illinois, Maryland and Connecticut. I supported this legislation and my last credit score was 759, as I was thinking of buying a used car (dealership), but didn't as I decided to run my 12 year Honda into the ground more.
    It is not totally "illegal" to request a credit report on an applicant for employment in CA. There are several situations where an employer still may do so including if the position involves access to person's DOB, SSN and financial information. Also an employer may request a report if the governmnet (one assumes federal but could also be CA) requires. California Joins States Restricting Use of Credit Reports for Employment Purposes | Littler Mendelson | Publications

    Nursing staff/healthcare workers at many facilites all over the USA do have access to SSNs, DOBs and other personal financial/credit history. Indeed within certain states such as Florida ID theft of medical records/personal patient information has almost reached plague level. You also see in the news more and more nurses being arrested for ID theft after using patient's SSNs and or financial information.

    Should these trends continue it is not unreasonable for owner's of healthcare facilities to head things off at the past and seek from Congress to put some or all positions as part of those where the federal government mandates or at least allows credit reports as part of the employment screening process.
    Esme12 likes this.
  7. Visit  jamie.glaze profile page
    3
    Quote from Sweet_Wild_Rose
    Re: Credit cards

    Someone once told me this tip: Put your cards on ice. Literally. As in, put them in a container of water and put it in the freezer. Makes you really think things over as to whether you really need whatever it is you're going to put on the credit card as it thaws out. Beats accumulating a lot of debt you wouldn't have had otherwise!

    That is what I have always done - you have to really think about it before spending.

    Back to the nursing shortage that doesn't exist - I'm really tired of arguing with people who think nursing is "recession proof"
  8. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    It is not totally "illegal" to request a credit report on an applicant for employment in CA. There are several situations where an employer still may do so including if the position involves access to person's DOB, SSN and financial information. Also an employer may request a report if the governmnet (one assumes federal but could also be CA) requires. California Joins States Restricting Use of Credit Reports for Employment Purposes | Littler Mendelson | Publications

    Nursing staff/healthcare workers at many facilites all over the USA do have access to SSNs, DOBs and other personal financial/credit history. Indeed within certain states such as Florida ID theft of medical records/personal patient information has almost reached plague level. You also see in the news more and more nurses being arrested for ID theft after using patient's SSNs and or financial information.

    Should these trends continue it is not unreasonable for owner's of healthcare facilities to head things off at the past and seek from Congress to put some or all positions as part of those where the federal government mandates or at least allows credit reports as part of the employment screening process.
    Furthermore to that:

    A quick read of further research into CA's new restrictions on employers using credit reports as a screening tool generally allows them for any employee that will have access to information that could be used for "ID theft".

    In of itself that is a very broad category of workers, but most surely covers nurses and many other healthcare and administrative workers in a variety of clinical settings ranging from prisons/jails to hospitals to nursing homes and all that is in between. Even physican offices and clinics one assumes would be covered. UAP's if they are totally restricted from charting and or otherwise having any access to patient records in theory could argue a credit report as part of their employment screening is now illegal in CA. However aides and other UAPs in many places do have access to patient's bedside tables, wallets, purses and for that matter anyone else's inside a facility.
  9. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    0
    Quote from Sweet_Wild_Rose
    Re: Credit cards

    Someone once told me this tip: Put your cards on ice. Literally. As in, put them in a container of water and put it in the freezer. Makes you really think things over as to whether you really need whatever it is you're going to put on the credit card as it thaws out. Beats accumulating a lot of debt you wouldn't have had otherwise!
    Personally whenever am going to make a purchase that one really does not require always hear Big Momma's voice from my youth in my head saying "put that back, you don't need it". When I countered "but I'm paying for it with my own money...", part two of the comment follows "so, stop letting that money burn a hole in your pocket. it's not what you earn but what you save..'

    Works almost every time.
  10. Visit  BennyRNCA profile page
    1
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    It is not totally "illegal" to request a credit report on an applicant for employment in CA. There are several situations where an employer still may do so including if the position involves access to person's DOB, SSN and financial information. Also an employer may request a report if the governmnet (one assumes federal but could also be CA) requires. California Joins States Restricting Use of Credit Reports for Employment Purposes | Littler Mendelson | Publications

    Nursing staff/healthcare workers at many facilites all over the USA do have access to SSNs, DOBs and other personal financial/credit history. Indeed within certain states such as Florida ID theft of medical records/personal patient information has almost reached plague level. You also see in the news more and more nurses being arrested for ID theft after using patient's SSNs and or financial information.

    Should these trends continue it is not unreasonable for owner's of healthcare facilities to head things off at the past and seek from Congress to put some or all positions as part of those where the federal government mandates or at least allows credit reports as part of the employment screening process.
    Exactly, the point is that even states like FL that do pull credit reports, still doesn't deter anyone from using the personal information of an individual to be used for illegal purposes.

    What I guess I'm trying to get at, is that one's terrible credit history does not mean one good nurse is a bad risk. Things happen that can happen to anyone, including you, such as a death in the family, a nasty divorce, a medical setback, having to care of some one in the family (parent(s), kid's, spouses that's not covered by insurance), things that can affect one's income or savings. I've seen people with FICO scores go from 800 to 600 or below, given one or even two of the factors I mentioned.

    Some of these things are beyond anyone's control.

    You can't put everyone with a bad credit score as a "don't hire, he/she is a thief or a no-good person to be trusted" category on that basis. It's unfair to me. I would rather base a person on his work history, references from previous employers and supervisors, other character references, criminal background checks.
    smartnurse1982 likes this.
  11. Visit  boomertx profile page
    2
    [color=#333333]and the big lie continues.
    health care industry will create 5.6 million more jobs by 2020: study
    [color=#333333]
    [color=#333333] the occupation poised to grow the most is nursing ... the nursing field will grow by 26 percent [color=#333333]between now and 2020, but that still won't allow for enough nurses to meet demand -- there will be an 800,000 nurse shortfall, the study found.

    Last edit by boomertx on Jul 10, '12 : Reason: visual appeal
    Not_A_Hat_Person and TheCommuter like this.
  12. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    0
    Reading the comments below that Huffington post article you can tell the readers are buying the premise hook, line and sinker. It's a great example of why we keep trying to bring the other side into the narrative, regardless of some people's opinions that we're making a big deal out of normal ebbs and flows in hiring related to the economy.
  13. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    0
    But up a link to the full Georgetown University study that prompted all the news coverage in the "News" forum. Hopefully it will be up soon as the mods approve.

    It really is an interesting study and a good read. It's over one hundred and so pages, so get some coffee and snacks. *LOL*

    Report lays out some predictions if true will truly rock nursing as many of y'all know it. For one it predicts unless steps are taken minorities will be at a disadvantage in future to becoming RNs. They base this on the increasing educational requirements expected of RNs (in short the BSN) which place an emphasis on math and sciences. Two subjects historically which Latino and African American students do poorly on average.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Visit Our Sponsors
Top
close
close