Night Shifts - Problem with the new Manager

  1. Dear Nurses,

    Need your advice/opinions on how to handle the following situation:
    I am supposed to return to work after being 1 year on maternity leave and a new manager scheduled me to work night shifts. In my unit if you a part timer - you get to work days/evenings or days/nights. I used to work d/e, but prior to matleave I worked full time and my schedule was different. Now I feel that I will be forced to work d/e/n both 12 and 8 hours and there is no way I can do it. My husband is an RN too and he gets activated on call few nights a week. I am going to see my manager next week and would love to hear your opinions on how to handle it. Almost all part time nurses in our Combined Care facility (L&D, Ante/Postpartum) work certain shifts - there is no contract between hospital and nurse saying that she will be doing shifts of preference.
    I am very dissapointed
    Last edit by rn/writer on Nov 4, '06
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   TazziRN
    Would it be possible to go to another facility?
  4. by   PurrRN
    I would just be open and honest. Tell them how much you liked being there and that you really would like to return but that a d/e/n/ schedule isn't going to work for you. You might be suprised and find out that they'll work with you. I hope so. Good luck!
  5. by   NiteWalker
    Thank you for replies.
    I will be honest with her - I hope she will understand me, but there is a big possibility that she won't agree ( I know this person very well). So unfortunately I am checking other opportunities in my hospital and other places. Just wanted to hear from people about shift issues in their workplaces. How do you approach your manager in a case you have particular preference.
  6. by   rjflyn
    I would go with what the others are saying. One compicating factor I noted but the others might not have is that you are located in Canada and the laws re medical leave probably vary considerably from the US.

    Here my experence is that most places will hold ones position open for a short leave ie the typical 12 weeks most women take here. After that the laws basicly say that the employer has to provide a like positon at a like wage. Generally shift does not fall under this unless by union contract, which most nurses dont fall under.

    One other option is dependant on the size of ones department if ones schedule is set ie repeats itself over and over. A person sometimes can find a coworker who is willing to work a permenat trade with managements blessing of course.

    Rj
  7. by   TrudyRN
    Quote from rjflyn
    I would go with what the others are saying. One compicating factor I noted but the others might not have is that you are located in Canada and the laws re medical leave probably vary considerably from the US.

    Here my experence is that most places will hold ones position open for a short leave ie the typical 12 weeks most women take here. After that the laws basicly say that the employer has to provide a like positon at a like wage. Generally shift does not fall under this unless by union contract, which most nurses dont fall under.

    One other option is dependant on the size of ones department if ones schedule is set ie repeats itself over and over. A person sometimes can find a coworker who is willing to work a permenat trade with managements blessing of course.

    Rj
    I bet the laws are better in Canada. Only in America do we force ourselves to leave our suckling babes and go back to work.

    I guess you will have to guage how to approach the new boss and what to do if she isn't helpful. I wish you lots of luck. How is the baby?
  8. by   NiteWalker
    The baby is doing very well, thanks. I am going to call my manager tomorrow. Hopefully, she will understand me - if not...
    I had to anticipate this problem earlier, but I didn't want to think about coming back while spending great time with my kids.

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