New LPN having trouble c CNA'S!!! HELP!!! - page 2

I just started working as an LPN 3 months ago...I worked as a CNA for 5 years. I work at a wonderful geriatric facility. I am 24 and I am very passionate about my job, and I genuinely care about my... Read More

  1. by   danak
    Boy do I feel for you! I was in a similar situation when I was a teacher. I had 12 autistic 3-yr-olds and four worthless aides. I was as kind as I could be, yet professional. Then I tried the "hey, lets go to dinner after work and be friends" method. Then I tried going to my supervisor...she was positively insane and abosolutely no help. Eventually, things deteriorated and I hated going in everyday. Nothing worked. I lined up a new job, ended up breaking my contract, and left 2 months before the school year was out. The thought of 60 more days was not worth losing my mental wellbeing over. Here's what I learned from my situation and from being in several working environments:

    People tend to initially dislike those that are above them in any manner-work ethic, status, etc. People who shine are often targets of envy, jealousy, pettiness. No matter what, you will be the "bad guy"- do your job/protect your license! Your family and friends like you, I know its hard, but who cares if your coworkers do not.

    Unfortunately, we still deal with ethnic and racial issues, no matter how modern of a civilization we claim to be. THIS was most definitely a factor in my case. I am of one ethnic origin and the aides are another. Just be aware of this sensitive situation as some tend to make issues of nonissues.

    Teamwork can be achieved, but it takes the right blend of people-each confident of their own skills and willing to seek help for their shortcomings. This situation cannot be forced, is extremely rare, and a blessing when you find it.

    Being lazy is a not a shortcoming...it is a way of life. These people are not there for the students/patients, coworkers, or for teamwork. They are there simply to take up space and then they want paid for it. Very few people take pride in their work. They want to do nothing and they want compensated for it.

    Don't ride all of them at the same time-they bond which makes them stronger. Work on one at a time, say one a month. Praise the others for any thing positive you can find. This will weaken them as a whole. The ones you are praising won't identify so strongly with the one who is being corrected. I wish I would have done this. Hindsight!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! It stinks having to do this, but think of it as a game.

    Use your chain of command to flush these people out. You are in charge. If they do not respond to this, go to your higher up or the higher-higher up and keep going. Have someone else explain your role to them. Sometimes this works, sometimes things get worse. Regardless, the situation cannot remain how it is. Beware of looking like a wavemaker to the higher-ups, be diplomatic and unemotional.

    If you get nowhere with your manager, supervisors, directors, etc. (as I did)and the situation remains the same, ask yourself just how miserable does this make you? You can just pick up their slack, go home, and be happy you have a job doing what you love. You may decide to move on. (I realized I didn't love my job enough to put up with the additional hassle.) Whatever the choice may be, make sure you've exhausted all of your options. Be like the phoenix and dare to rise up from the ash!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    -Dana
  2. by   coolatta19
    Quote from catcolalex
    dont like it? leave. go somewhere else.
    and let the CNA's continue to work with their rude, childish and unprofessional ways?? She doesn't need the changes in her life and work ethic...the CNA's do...That's not how you solve a problem...

    I'm a CNA and would never, ever behave in such a disgusting way. I believe in TEAMWORK whether your higher up or a newbie...The CNA's need a lesson in
    work ethics and teamwork. In my opinion, someone in managment needs to get involved or start handing out pink slips...
  3. by   txspadequeenRN
    "Bake brownies and tell them if you dont shape up Ill have to excert my authority and write you up" Are you kidding ,this nurse needs to get tough. If she shows up with her apron on, not only will they put it in reverse and run her over, she will be labeled a "wussy". I get brownies when Im a good girl why would you give brownies to horrible cna's. Anyway , how about laying down the law, talk to staffing and have them split up. When it comes to elder abuse or neglect there is no options, it's either the right way or pack it up baby and clock yourself out. I too am a charge nurse, my CNA's respect me and although I am very intimidating we have a very good work relationship we get along and all goes well. I put up with no BS at ALL !!!!! So your CNA's talk about you, thats everywhere . Time to get tough, or you will continue to be a door mat....



    Quote from Rhoresmith
    I think writing them up would only cause you more problems. Maybe try baking brownies or ordering pizza for lunch and say I want us to be a team, we need to all work togather on this. Now we can do this the nice way or I will have to excert my authority and write you all up. Show them that you want to work with them not against them and give them that option. You have then put the ball in their court to decide what they want, then they are responsible for their write ups because you tried
  4. by   tmiller027
    I'm glad I work in a good facility. I'm a CNA and most of us CNAs work together as a team along with the nurses, and lazy slackers get pressured out by us and the management. We recently had this guy who on his first week managed to sexually harass about half the female aides (most the girls I work with are like my sisters) and when he wasn't doing that, he treated aide work like a spectator sport, sitting in a recliner and watching his partner do all the work. He lasted about two weeks. Once word got around, no one wanted to work with him, when we did, we just did our work and ignored him and the management started leaning on him. Finally after two weeks, he just quit showing up. Not like that was any big loss.

    I think the best nurses in our facility are the ones who let us get our work done. If they need something address immediatly thats one thing. We have one nurse who is constantly stopping us to go and get someone a pair of heel protectors or something, all while we're trying to put people to bed. I'm sorry, but that kind of stuff can wait until everyone is in bed, then we can go through and find that stuff. This nurse also leaves medicine cups lying around and likes to yell at the aides in front of residents and family members. I have no idea how she made it through school though. There are several of us CNAs who start nursing school this fall, so I'll be part time soon.

    Tim
  5. by   opalmRN
    I just started working as an LPN 3 months ago...I worked as a CNA for 5 years. I work at a wonderful geriatric facility. I am 24 and I am very passionate about my job, and I genuinely care about my patients and I also care about being a role model for others when caring for the elderly. My problem is that my CNA's are not working with me. I work 7-3 and have 26 patients, and as all nurses know there are treatments, paperwork, MEDS, families, as well as interacting with dietary, PT, OT, and many others...so much to do...
    You have walked in their shoes and it is evident you know what it means to be a good CNA. That is an asset and will aide you when you speak on behalf of the residents. It only takes one to bring down the moral and professionalism of the entire group and if this is already the "norm" for this group you have every right to be part of the resolution.

    My CNA's complain constantly....are loud, laugh, carry on...when in the dining room at meal, residents are ignored, yes they try to spoon food into their mouths but they don't talk with them, they talk loudly and laugh loudly with their co-workers...when I ask, and ask politely and many times offer my help to put a pt on the toilet or to put them to bed they don't do it at all and I end up doing it, or they roll their eyes....when I do something to try and help them out such as get more help when we are short, I get yelled at in front of residents that they don't need help and I did the wrong thing.
    Meet with your super and/or their super. Focus on the patient concerns. Bottom line, if they report to you it's your license on the line.

    I am talked about behind my back, they whisper and huddle in corners and I have heard they say I am too uptight for a 24 year old. I have spoke with other nurses and they have said that this has been a problem on my unit before and that other aides dont want to work there because of the aides that work there now. I am a kind, fun, and outgoing person....I am affectionate with my residents and I am hard working...I just want to see that they are taken care of well....how do I handle this, and what am I doing wrong? Please help
    Chances are you are the new person on the block, your it. As hard as it may be, let the petty, immature things roll. It's not their friendship you need it's cooperation. It has been my experience when you have worked as a caregiver and then take a position up the ladder it truly is an asset to your career as well as your facility. Use your experience to work for you.

    Good luck, and don't get discouraged.
  6. by   RN34TX
    Quote from tmiller027
    This nurse also leaves medicine cups lying around and likes to yell at the aides in front of residents and family members. I have no idea how she made it through school though.
    Tim
    Nurses who behave like that are a part of the "bad CNA" problem. Setting a good example is very important, particularly to very impressionable CNA's who someday may become nurses themselves. This yelling behavior needs to be reported to her supervisor every time it occurs because she obviously lacks in management skills needed to properly manage a unit. She needs counseling and then a class and/or preceptorship to gain good management skills.
    This will help not only in better communication between her and the CNA's but also how to appropriately delegate tasks- such as realizing that heel protectors are not a matter of life and death and do not require that the CNA be interrupted from putting people to bed to run and get heel protectors.
    I can only speak from the LPN and Associate degree RN experience and I can tell you that nurses in those two categories get very little if any training in how to manage and delegate properly even though we are expected to do it after graduating.
    Regardless of training, common sense should tell anyone that it is not ok to yell at staff in front of residents and families.
  7. by   tmiller027
    Quote from RN34TX
    Nurses who behave like that are a part of the "bad CNA" problem. Setting a good example is very important, particularly to very impressionable CNA's who someday may become nurses themselves. This yelling behavior needs to be reported to her supervisor every time it occurs because she obviously lacks in management skills needed to properly manage a unit. She needs counseling and then a class and/or preceptorship to gain good management skills.
    This will help not only in better communication between her and the CNA's but also how to appropriately delegate tasks- such as realizing that heel protectors are not a matter of life and death and do not require that the CNA be interrupted from putting people to bed to run and get heel protectors.
    I can only speak from the LPN and Associate degree RN experience and I can tell you that nurses in those two categories get very little if any training in how to manage and delegate properly even though we are expected to do it after graduating.
    Regardless of training, common sense should tell anyone that it is not ok to yell at staff in front of residents and families.
    Well, the scary thing is, this nurse is about 60 yrs old and has been an LPN for 20 years. I think they're about to fire her, but are just waiting until some of the newly hired nurses get oriented. Even the other nurses can't stand her. And yes, the CNAs report every stupid thing that she does. I heard her complain one week after she got in trouble for something, that the aides have more authority than the nurses. Its not that, its that even though we don't have a license at stake, the CNAs at our place actually care about our residents and aren't going to let another CNA, nurse, or doctor for that matter treat them badly.

    I do have to say, one nice thing about working LTC. If there's someone you work with that you can't stand, don't quit, just give it a few months and they'll be gone one way or another lol
  8. by   Rhoresmith
    [quote=txspadequeen921]"bake brownies and tell them if you dont shape up ill have to excert my authority and write you up" are you kidding ,this nurse needs to get tough. if she shows up with her apron on, not only will they put it in reverse and run her over, she will be labeled a "wussy". i get brownies when im a good girl why would you give brownies to horrible cna's. anyway , how about laying down the law, talk to staffing and have them split up. when it comes to elder abuse or neglect there is no options, it's either the right way or pack it up baby and clock yourself out. i too am a charge nurse, my cna's respect me and although i am very intimidating we have a very good work relationship we get along and all goes well. i put up with no bs at all !!!!! so your cna's talk about you, thats everywhere . time to get tough, or you will continue to be a door mat....[/quote]
    well you might laugh but it worked for me not as a nurse but i was put in charge at a group home of the cna's and i had nothing but problems, so i called a meeting ordered pizza (food in healthcare seems to work) and provided drinks and then while they were eating i lowered the boom. i told them that i was in charge and the more difficult they made it for me the more difficult i would make it for them. i didn't want it that way i wanted a team, and that we would all be happier and that the next inspection would go better and guess what it worked. they all thought i was being a snob because i came in and didn't really talk to them, i explained that the first few weeks i was so busy trying to learn everything and get a routine that i didn't have time. i worked there two more years and not one person left the home was closed down by the company that is why i left. we recieved number one ratings by our state every inspection thereafter and before this home had 6 and 7's (1-10 scale 1 being best 10 worst anything over 7 state can close if problems not fixed) so this does work it opens the doors of communication!!!!!!!!
    Last edit by Rhoresmith on Jul 14, '04 : Reason: typed to fast errors
  9. by   Nurse2B73
    I say they are jealous because you are young and have your LPN license. They feel intimidated but they need to get over it. If you have the authority to write them up then please do so. Also talk to your DON and see what kind of direction she has. If she is letting this happen then I would contact the OMBUDSMEN and report that facility. If they have that many CNAs not doing their job their they need to be fired.
    You hould be able to tell them to get off their butts and stop ignoring the residents that is totally against the rule along with the gossiping or loud talking and laughing when they should be feeding the resident and talking to them.

    If it was me I would report it if I can't get any help from the other nurse.

    Just my input.





    Quote from nursedes
    I just started working as an LPN 3 months ago...I worked as a CNA for 5 years. I work at a wonderful geriatric facility. I am 24 and I am very passionate about my job, and I genuinely care about my patients and I also care about being a role model for others when caring for the elderly. My problem is that my CNA's are not working with me. I work 7-3 and have 26 patients, and as all nurses know there are treatments, paperwork, MEDS, families, as well as interacting with dietary, PT, OT, and many others...so much to do...

    My CNA's complain constantly....are loud, laugh, carry on...when in the dining room at meal, residents are ignored, yes they try to spoon food into their mouths but they don't talk with them, they talk loudly and laugh loudly with their co-workers...when I ask, and ask politely and many times offer my help to put a pt on the toilet or to put them to bed they don't do it at all and I end up doing it, or they roll their eyes....when I do something to try and help them out such as get more help when we are short, I get yelled at in front of residents that they don't need help and I did the wrong thing.

    I am talked about behind my back, they whisper and huddle in corners and I have heard they say I am too uptight for a 24 year old. I have spoke with other nurses and they have said that this has been a problem on my unit before and that other aides dont want to work there because of the aides that work there now. I am a kind, fun, and outgoing person....I am affectionate with my residents and I am hard working...I just want to see that they are taken care of well....how do I handle this, and what am I doing wrong? Please help
  10. by   MandyInMS
    *sighs* we hear these complaints so often on this BB..it's sad :/
    No matter what your position, if you're the 'new kid' you will be tested, or for a better word PUSHED, to see how much BS you will take. If change is what you want, buckle up and get ready for a rough ride. Be assertive and stick up for what you know is right/wrong...best of luck to ya (((hugzzz)))
  11. by   cnyrn
    I agree that the CNA's resent you because you have taken the initiative to get your LPN license. They are jealous, I would be concerned they might be vicious enough to set you up. I would leave the facility (or at least that unit)
    This type of behavior occurs also when the LPN becomes an Rn, etc. Watch your back and CYA.

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