new grads that don'y ask questions - page 2

:confused: The hospital I work at usually gets new grads in during the month of July. I love seeing them come with their excitement, curiosity, and actually nervousness. Only b/c it keeps me... Read More

  1. by   Mito
    Hello All,

    During my medicine rotation I asked my instructor and other RN's questions when I required help or guidence with something. However, there were nurses who wanted us to ask them questions just so they could stroke their ego. Now ofcourse this is not true of the majority of RN's since most are very helpful. But I don't judge all RN's based on a few negative responses. I know the majority of students I have worked with over the past 3 years follow the above procedure. I am now starting my clinical consolidation on a medical floor and I am sure my preceptor will be very helpful. This is just a student's perspective and most of us ask questions when we need help and you guys are rigtht god help the ones who don't, since they are missing out on a "real life educational opportunity".

    Mito
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I agree a new grad who does not ask questions may be a lawsuit waiting to happen. If it's arrogance, you need to address it. If it's fear, you need to address it. But ASSuming they just refuse to learn is NOT fair.......I still say, many are PETRIFIED of looking like FOOLS......We all were there and we all cope in different ways. Try changing your approach w/them and quit making assumptions til you know what and how they think!
  3. by   emily_mom
    I think very few new nurses don't want to learn. I think they are afraid of asking stupid (and there is no such thing) questions because it will show their inexperience or incompetence in an area. Like zudy said, we don't come into this world wearing scrubs and birkies. I think if the nurse felt comfortable around her trainer, it would be easier for the newbie to ask questions w/o fear of retribution. I loved my trainer. She "thought out loud" too, and that was such a great help to me.

    Kristy
  4. by   JohnnyGage
    Originally posted by SmilingBluEyes
    I agree a new grad who does not ask questions may be a lawsuit waiting to happen. If it's arrogance, you need to address it. If it's fear, you need to address it. But ASSuming they just refuse to learn is NOT fair
    While this is true, I have worked with my share of newbies that not only don't ask questions, but when approached with a new learning experience ("Hey, ______, we're going to be placing a temporary pacer under flouro -- come see how it's done." or "Here's an interesting hemodynamic profile -- let's take a look at it.") They are completely uninterested and would much rather hole up in their corner and concentrate on their tasks. It is these new nurses (or nurses new to critical care) that don't fly. Fear of asking questions is easy to address. Complete disinterest isn't so easy.
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    well, johnny that is a situation that IS a problem....if they are uninterested, that is another story. but my experience has been that the occurence of that is rare. most ARE interested in what i am teaching them....when i open them up. the ones you bring up--- those ARE duds, if you ask me! and those duds who need to be documented as such.
  6. by   altomga
    my gosh, did not think that this would stir such debate. again, let me say, i ask and ask questions, offer clinical experiences that they will have to be aware of, use other nurses pt problems to review critical thinking skills, give them websites to visit, review questions in their orientation booklet, etc...and like I said, I am a mentor on the the floor, and still feel that I am approachable and easy going, but it is the ultimately the responsibility of the new nurse to inhale and retain the information and continue to ask questions for reinforcement. When I was new all I ever said to myself; Is that I would rather look stupid and feel embarrassed than injure a pt or do something wrong.
    The RESPONSIBILITY STILL LIES ON THE NEW GRAD...we are there for encouragement and to share our knowledge. Whether they accept it is another thing.
  7. by   JohnnyGage
    Originally posted by SmilingBluEyes
    well, johnny that is a situation that IS a problem....if they are uninterested, that is another story. but my experience has been that the occurence of that is rare. most ARE interested in what i am teaching them....when i open them up. the ones you bring up--- those ARE duds, if you ask me! and those duds who need to be documented as such.
    Well, I think those are the types that were originally mentioned ... altomga wrote about nurses that walk away when she's trying to explain things.

    If it's simply fear of ridicule or embarassment when asking questions, most newbies learn fairly early who they feel comforrtable approaching. However, in the end we all have to work together. So comfort or not, you better be able to interact with all of us.
  8. by   bewbew
    I am to start my grad year soon, and I tell you what, I will cetainly be asking questions........all the time! I have noticed on my clinicals even the experienced RNs are always doing research, asking questions etc, so it seems to me in this job you can never expect to know it all, and it is a constant learning process throughout your career!
    I have noticed some who don't like to answer questions, or be stuck with the students. I think the student/grad also has to take a bit of responsibility and actually do some groundwork too.....I know if I had to answer obvious questions in which the student/grad could have made a little effort in finding answers would drive me crazy too!
    I am as you can imagine a bit nervous about starting, and when I discuss this with my husband (an experienced RN), he says, 'ask questions, remember you cannot know everything', basically he is repeating all of what you guys have already said in this thread. I remember him coming home very frustrated at times, after preceptoring students/grads, who thought they knew it all.
    I hope I have preceptors like you guys!!
  9. by   AmAnRN
    hey.. just wanted to share an experience.... one day on my orientation on days (i now work nights..cant handle the hectic days..) i had a pt's colostomy bag 'go bad' and leaked everywhere. well, my preceptor took a while to get in the room and i felt so stupid and embarrased in front of the pt. well, while me and my preceptor were cleaning him up, the nurse manager came by the room and said for me to come to her office when we go to done. well, i went to her office and she was telling me i should have been able to fix that incident by myself and i should be able to do stuff on my own and only ask how to do it once. well, i just like to be sure i am not going to mess something up. (rather be safe than sorry.) she said that i was on my 6th week of orientation but clinically i was showing that i was about week 2. but anyways.. i went to nights and things got better and now i start O.B. wednesday, so i am glad to be off the medical floor!! thanks for listening...
  10. by   JohnnyGage
    That's an unfortunate experience, Amanda (both the nurse manager and the colostomy). It also illustrates why some newbies don't feel like they can ask questions. I'm glad things are going better for you now!
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Thanks for sharing AM....perfect example of what I am saying. I hope things go better for you now!
  12. by   deespoohbear
    I feel like I have a keen sense with newbies about who is truly scared and afraid to ask questions, and those who think they know everything the minute they step on the unit. The first I have no problems with, and welcome and encourage their questions. The second type scare the hell out of me....like another poster stated...lawsuit waiting to happen...My personal philosophy is I am NOT too good to ask questions when I am not sure about something, and I have been on the floor for quite awhile. Not a week goes by that I don't learn something from one of my co-workers-some of them "newbies" and some of them not...We only learn when we ask questions...but if we let arrogance get in the way of our learning, then we are a danger to our patients, our co-workers, and ourselves......
    Last edit by deespoohbear on Dec 30, '02
  13. by   MishlB
    Originally posted by altomga
    The hospital I work at usually gets new grads in during the month of July. I love seeing them come with their excitement, curiosity, and actually nervousness. Only b/c it keeps me grounded and reminds me of how I felt the first day I stepped on the floor I for one don't mind all the questions (even when they are repeated over and over); it lets me know that the new RN realizes they don't know everything and are smart enough to find out through asking, researching, and asking again. They are (lets be real now) what we call "Fresh Meat"!!
    I have a problem with the new grad that walks in and NEVER asks any questions!!! When you try to explain something to them the space out and/or walk away from you. You guys know what I mean; the know it alls!! These RN's scare me a lot!! As long as I've been a nurse I still learn something everyday; and I sure as heck didn't know "everything" when I got handed my degree and passed my Boards....
    Does anyone else have this problem or feel this way; and what do you do about it?
    I keep notes and report my feelings to the "mgmnt".
    Maybe all your secret management notetaking is making them nervous? Did you forget how hard it was to be a new grad????

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