New Grad

  1. As a soon to be new graduate nurse, I have been told to start out working night shifts because they're slower and it will give us time to gain organizational skills. What do you think?
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   live4today
    imhpo...........that's a bunch of hogwash! somebody's snowing you honey. don't buy into that crap! nightshifts are quite hectic, and not a piece of cake to work. it's not easy to learn on nights either. you learn best by putting your best foot forward, and pressing on with the shift at hand. go for the shift that works out best for you, and thank everyone for their opinion about what shift you should work, but tell them "no thanks" on the nightshift unless that is the shift you want to work.
  4. by   fergus51
    For us, nights are just as busy and we have less support staff and docs around. So, you're actually required to work more independently and that's a challenge for a new grad.
  5. by   akvarmit
    Hi there! I am a new grad - 6 months on the job - and I have been working steady nights as my choice. The other posts bring up some good points to consider!
    Are you being encouraged to go to nights because that shift is "short" and you look like a quick fix? Or does your floor have a "culture" that requrires new people to do more of the "off shifts"?
    Nights are just a busy as days - just a different busy! And I also agree with the post about functioning even more independently on nights. I find nights on my floor to be more "primary nursing" focused. However, I do get to take more time to check all my charts and make sure orders aren't missed, and look into the pt's backgrounds a little to make sure we're addressing their needs. I never had time to do that on daylight - running from one doc to another feeling like I didn't know the answers to their questions anyway.
    Our facility is "teaching" and we have residents - so I have enjoyed working nights with them and getting to know them more. Seems I'm always calling the same few all the time!
    However, I have developed the "night shift" mouth where I find my "internal voice" doesn't work anymore and I just blurt out what I think at a moments notice. 12hr nights and too much coffee does that to you!
    Good luck in your decision!
    Dawn
  6. by   sjoe
    Quote from fergus51
    For us, nights are just as busy and we have less support staff and docs around. So, you're actually required to work more independently and that's a challenge for a new grad.

    Exactly right.

    (BTW: this new software doesn't allow me to post "Exactly," but insists that the response be at least 10 characters. One more problem with it, IMHO.)
  7. by   nekhismom
    I work nights as a new grad, and I feel I have done myself a big disservice. I like nights, that's my natural rhythm, but I just don't get to learn all the stuff I would on days. I don't get to see any interventions or learn much. Im in a level II NICU, though, so all I do at night is change, feed, weigh, change beds, and put kids to sleep. During the day, I would do much more. I feel like I need to learn more skills than I currently am learning.

    IF you want to work nights, go for it. just be sure to orient on days at first.
  8. by   Darchild77
    you also might ,CONVENIENTLY, get stuck working night shift permanently. These things seem to happen to new people:imbar

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