New & Ready To Move On To Bigger & Better - page 3

I hate this job. It is so hard to think of my job as a "career" when I get paid the same as a waitress & get treated like one too. I am disrespected on a daily basis by patients, their families, and... Read More

  1. by   Mulan
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    and the main thing (at least to me) is being in a position to desperately need the support and assistance of people that may not have your best interests and may screw you royally.

    Isn't that the truth! Something learned the hard way.
  2. by   Agnus
    Emmanuel Goldstein,
    I was not referring to your post. was referring to her comment that "they just don't get it." That they give her a blank stare.
  3. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    Are many of these students entering nursing programs these days expecting to start out 'on top'? Is it a matter of not wanting to get their hands dirty (I say that as some have expressed disdain at cleaning poop)? Is it those damnable (and completely unrealistic) J&J ads?

    I think it starts before they get to nursing school. Remember, most of the general public does not truly understand what nurses do. A lot of people enter this profession with the idea that they will earn a fairly high salary for giving people their medications and helping them to the bathroom. They believe that all the responsibility, the hard decisions and the complicated thinking is done by physicians. They don't have a true understanding of how complex and difficult this field is. Clinicals by design, do not give you a true taste of what you are about to experience. This is evidenced by numerous posts by about to be new grads who expect to work 60 hours a week for infinity or they expect to work full-time jobs with agency on the side while simultaneously returning for their master's degrees. The reality is almost crushing. It's been almost 17 years since I was a new grad but I remember feeling everything that the OP and others are voicing.


    Having said all of that, there is a bright side. Nursing is a tremendously flexible job. If you hate the bedside you don't have to leave nursing entirely, thus your 4 years are not "wasted". So many nurses refuse to consider that there are so many options especially if you live in an urban area, it's crazy. For many years, I worked at the bedside only 1-3 days a week, more or less as I felt physically or emotionally stressed. Since I was 1 year out of nursing school, bedside nursing was always my sideline, never my main job. I also like what ernursewendy said about being your own advocate. As long as you take crap from physicians, patients and your coworkers, they will dish it. Once I learned that, my life was so much easier. I took my lunch and on the rare occasion that I didn't I clocked out "no lunch".
  4. by   marie-francoise
    Maybe times have changed in hospital nursing. Maybe it's just gotten worse for hospital nurses (thanks for those ratios, managed care!).

    And now the patient is the "client" - this term's a real indicator of just how far the business mentality has extended into (tainted) health care.
  5. by   MrsCannibal
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    I think it starts before they get to nursing school. Remember, most of the general public does not truly understand what nurses do. A lot of people enter this profession with the idea that they will earn a fairly high salary for giving people their medications and helping them to the bathroom. They believe that all the responsibility, the hard decisions and the complicated thinking is done by physicians.
    It doesn't help the public's perception of nursing when every medical show on TV shows nurses as secondary characters, standing by doing nothing while Dr's make all the important decisions, have all of the insights and understanding, and even check vitals and dispense meds. Nurses are shown as helpless bystanders who do nothing more except stand in the background waiting for "orders". :angryfire grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr Whew, OK, I will step down from the soapbox now...
  6. by   anonymurse
    When we graduate school where we paid for the experience, we enter the workplace where we get paid. This signifies a huge change. Paying means we get to have it our way. Getting paid means someone else gets to have it their way.
  7. by   lorster
    I wonder what percentage of nurses who hate their jobs, work on med surg.
  8. by   Medic2RN
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    Remember, most of the general public does not truly understand what nurses do. A lot of people enter this profession with the idea that they will earn a fairly high salary for giving people their medications and helping them to the bathroom.
    I think not only the public hasn't a clue, but administrators, some doctors, and any PR personnel.
  9. by   beachbum3
    I am a student graduating in May. I'm not really sure I know what to expect when I get out there and begin working as a RN. It scares the heck out of me reading all the posts from new grads who hate it though.

    I can tell you this- being a RN has been my dream since I was 19. There was a point in time I thought I'd never get there (single parent, no family or friends in the area to help out with the kids so I could go to school and work at night). Now that I'm almost finished, I'm excited to get out there and get working. I know myself well enough to know I'd be miserable in med surg. I will not accept a position there. I want to work in an ER, and will do what I need to in order to end up there. I enjoy the crazy fast paced environment. I like that you get your patients in and out - they don't stay there for days. I like that you see so many different things. When I get out of school I expect to feel like I don't know anything, and that I'm on a steep learning curve. I expect that the real world is much different than what you are taught in school. I expect to have to earn the respect of my coworkers and most likely not to be accepted or appreciated until I can hold my own during my shifts. I realize that with the fast paced environment most likely the attitude from other nurses will be that of annoyance- I realize they are already busy enough and that having to train a brand new nurse takes up more time they don't have. I expect to hate it some days, especially when I really don't know what I'm doing yet, and even still when I do. I expect to be exhausted by the end of my shift, mentally and physically. Even so, I can't wait to be a nurse. At the end of my clinical days I always hold my head a bit higher, because I'm starting to feel like a nurse. Its something I'm proud of. I know its going to be hard, and an adjustment, but I have a pretty strong personality- and I'm obstinate... I won't let bad days, or having a rough time with the other nurses stop me. I know sooner or later I'll grow on them and hopefully be one of the bunch and accepted, I generally tend to fit in pretty well with most people...but I don't expect that for quite awhile. And if there are still the nurses out there after time passes and I get on my feet that still want to treat me like crap... well.. oh well. Their problem, not mine.

    I do hope I'm right, and don't hate it when I graduate though!! I'm pretty sure this is for me, and some day I hope I will become a damn good nurse!!
  10. by   ebear
    beachbum3,
    Sounds like a great attitude! WE NEED YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    ebear
  11. by   love-d-OR
    To the OP, sorry that you are feeling this way. Im sure it must feel horrible to feel as if you have wasted 4 years of hard work. As someone else said, no experience is a waste of time.

    To Emanuel Goldstein, I dont think students are deceived by instructors, at least not intentionally. A lot of instructors will tell you that cleaning poop and giving bedbaths is what the nurse aide does but because you need to supervise and delegate you need to have a knowledge of those things.

    Im a senior student, and I started working as a nurse aide the day I decided to start taking prereques for nursing. One thing that I have noticed among my classmates is that more than 50% of them had no real idea of what a day as a nurse was like. During fundamentals when we were told to give bedbaths some of them seemed shocked. To this day I know more than half of my class has never given a bath or wiped poop. This is all after 2.5 years. During clinical, we as students tend to focus on the clinical (medical) experience.

    I dont want to sound arrogant, but myself and some others in my class will do both meds and direct patient care. But most students only have eyes for careplans and meds. Has your patient gotten a bath? I think the aide gave him a bath. Your patient needs a diaper change. Oh, uhm...

    My observaions have finally led me to believe that nursing students would do much better if they were introduced into nursing as aides before they were admitted into school. Okay, so maybe Im strecthing it, but maybe if they were required to shadow a nurse for a day or two it would help, instead of requiring volunteer experience.
    Last edit by love-d-OR on Dec 17, '07
  12. by   sequin121
    Oh my gosh! I have never seen so many new nurses be so critical of my profession. Perhaps you are all correct when you say you have chosen the wrong profession. If so, please leave as soon as possible for your own sanity as well as the sanity of our patients and your colleagues. Did you honestly think you could work as a nurse and not help meet patients' needs? Those needs may include cleaning a behind or bringing water. And doing those "waitress" things are just part of working as part of your team. I can tell you (although you may not be seeing it now) that what you are doing everyday has more impact on peoples' lives than a lifetime of waitressing. If you are not motivated by the thought of making a difference in people's lives and are more motivated by your own needs, then this is not the profession for you.

    This is not to say that you shouldn't expect an environment where you can do your best work. You should have management teams who advocate for your needs just as you advocate for patients' needs. If you are not in an environment where that is happening....then you need to find a place where it will happen. You also need to be assured that as your skills and confidence grows, you will gain more respect from physicians. However, you don't get respect without commanding it. You are medical professionals who are educated and have much to offer. Don't allow anyone to take that from you.

    I don't know what city you all are in and how many options are open to you professionally. But life is way too short to be this miserable.

    I wish you all the best...

close