Neglect...LPN was fired, RN was not - page 19

I wanted to get everyone's opinion on a heated debate at my workplace. I work in a large hospital's Med/Surg unit. Usually 8-9 patients are lumped together as a "team" with an RN, LPN and CNA on each... Read More

  1. by   CHATSDALE
    matsmom you are so right that the facility will hang you out to dry without a seconds thought---but just how long can the other nurses in a unit cover for someone who refuses to pull their own weight...if you are uncomfortable or you feel you cannot use certain equipment or care for certain type of pts then move on to another area where you can use your own particular talents and let the someone else who can fit in do the other job...no reflection on you maybe they would not be able to do your job....
  2. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from CHATSDALE
    matsmom you are so right that the facility will hang you out to dry without a seconds thought---but just how long can the other nurses in a unit cover for someone who refuses to pull their own weight...if you are uncomfortable or you feel you cannot use certain equipment or care for certain type of pts then move on to another area where you can use your own particular talents and let the someone else who can fit in do the other job...no reflection on you maybe they would not be able to do your job....
    Well this is a different issue. I agree if a nurse wants to work/float frequently to ICU for example but refuses to care for basic ICU patients she is likely going to be a drain on the others...and I have worked with this type. They need to get out of ICU I agree.

    Float nurses are a whole 'nuther problem, but some hospitals will bully them into floating to areas they are not comfortable in, and this makes it hard on regular staff who have to work 2-3 times as hard to cover for them. If this happens frequently it can be impossible liability. If regular staff agrees with this except for a rare ocurrence it can become 'business as usual' and a regular staffing policy.

    One has to look at the whole picture of the unit that shift and decide on an individual basis whether it is safe or not...we all have our comfort zones. I've had directors pull uncomfortable medsurg nurses with limited experience into my ICU and want charge to assume responsibility and 'supervise' their basic medsurg care, as the only one with critical care knowledge. Its each nurses' own call if we want to accept this liability, whether its once in a blue moon or routine practice..

    There are too many hospitals in my area that run their critical care units in this way and I am no longer comfortable doing charge/staff there anymore. Personal decision. I do agency work now and just take 'my own' patients now...much easier.
  3. by   guitarguy2
    It seems the problem started with the assignment of 12-14 patients, one of which being the GI bleeder. That's waaayyyy too heavy of a load. I'd have to know what the LPN was doing during that time...if they could show they were tied up with a code, etc., that might alleviate some of their responsibility. But if they weren't, then I hold the LPN 70% responsible, the hospital 10% responsible, and the RN 20%. Most of the problem, assuming the LPN was not tied up with an emergent situation, is directly a result of their action. The RN is responsible for not adequately keeping track of work flow, and the hospital set it up with the bad assignment.
  4. by   Bipley
    Quote from elkpark
    I hate to be a nag, but this is another example of why it's so important to carry your own liability insurance. Does anyone reading this believe that the hospital is going to lift a finger to defend either of the nurses? The LPN who was fired could now be sued for malpractice by the family, and she isn't even employed by the hospital anymore, SO .... No help there! The hospital was attempting to minimize its own liability by firing her. The RN who hasn't been fired could also be sued, and, if she's (he's?) expecting any support or defense from the hospital, I've got some swamp land in AZ that I'd like to sell her ...

    I notice that a lot of people who have debated against carrying your own insurance on this BB often seem to assume that people only sue out of some cagey, calculated determination of who has the money ... It's not that simple -- some families just sue because they loved their family member and perceive that the health professionals caring for them dropped the ball in a big way. It's not always about money; sometimes it's about justice ...
    Amazingly, it IS possible to carry medical malpractice and not realize it. Honest, it's true.

    One of my reasons for not carrying my own MM insurance was because there are a great number of people that will only sue those with the pocketbooks. If you have insurance, you are sued. I was talking to my Dad about this years ago. It wasn't a huge in-depth conversation, just a side comment.

    I didn't know until after he died a few months ago that he had been maintaining a MM policy for me for the past 15 years. It was cheap, like $200/year. But the evil skank he was married to explained that he felt if something were to happen, I would be covered. But if I honestly answered that no, I had no MM insurance the chances of my being sued would be much less.

    I have assets, but one wouldn't know what kinds of assets I had via assumption. My S/O is an MD and we've been together for 17 years. Assumptions are amazing... thinking I am a single RN leaves less reason to sue me. Knowing my S/O is a doc and the stakes are suddenly raised.
  5. by   P_RN
    Please note this thread is over a year old.

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