Need advice - bail on my accelerated BSN for an ADN?(long) - page 6

I am in semester 2 of a 4 semester accelerated BSN program. Right now I am kicking myself for not applying to the ADN program at my local CC. The more I learn, the more I feel like I am spinning my... Read More

  1. by   olderthandirt
    Many states are now requiring RN's to have a four year degree. My state, NY is just about to pass that law. If you are already an RN, then you are allowed 10 years in which to get that four year degree. Are you going to want to do that in several years? :mortarboard:
  2. by   Redlady
    I'm sure others have said this, but IF you are still thinking of transfering into the ADN program, you better check on WHEN you could get in.

    Here in my area, the wait for any ADN program is 2+ years, and that's IN DISTRICT. At my CC, if you're out of district, you can pretty much forget it. The accelerated programs are a one shot deal, you apply for that year, if you don't get in, you reapply next year.

    You may find yourself out of the BSN program and then waiting 2+ years to even get IN to an ADN program. By that time, you would have already graduated with your BSN.

    It is tough, but it's possible. We all look for the out, but it's not always the right choice. Good luck with your decision!!!
  3. by   angelwatch
    Your pain and frustration is temporary. You are almost finished. The BSN will give you more opportunity for the future. You are worthy and will increase your salary. It is natural to be frustrated.

    Hug that man of yours and feel the love for you are blessed and don't give up!
  4. by   onlyhope
    I am about to graduate from an accelerated BSN program in Northern Kentucky and although it has been a crazy 18 months it seems worth it in the end! About 6 months ago I was really kicking myself for signing up for the madness AND PAYING FOR IT!!!! but now that graduation is one and a half months away and i've already accepted a job I am glad I stuck with it. I say go for it you only have two semesters left (ps i was a straight A student pre ABSN but now i just try my hardest and if i get a B it is not the end of the world.
  5. by   dt335263
    I labored over a decision about what type of program to do...back in 1978 when the BSN was just starting to be known as important and significantly different. If I had it to do over, I would have done it differently.

    I decided to do a long diploma program which would give me lots of experience. It was three full time years, including summers and it was difficult. When I graduated, I could be in charge of any type of floor in our hospital and I had done many procedures many times and I thought I had made the right decision. Now, I don't think so.

    I continued my education (to get the BSN) using the Regents External Degree Program (now Excelsior) as it allowed me to take tests for all my experience and knowledge and take courses at any accredited college for things I needed for the distribution requirements (humanities, etc)...It took years...finally, I graduated and felt like I was not much further along but I was definitely filled up to my eyeballs with nursing.

    So, for my Masters I started an MPH program. After completing nearly half the program at Hunter, I realized I hadn't learned much at all and I switched to Columbia University School of Public Health and got an MPH . When I graduated, I felt like I had finally caught up with myself.

    After a great deal of nursing experience I applied to become an instructor in several of the nursing programs (I am in NYC so there are quite a few). I discovered that the profession of nursing is not the slightest bit interested in having me teach anything (despite my extensive experience and 20 years in research) because I did not have an "advanced" degree in nursing. This is the same in nursing programs all over the country as I discovered when I applied to online schools.

    My advice is - get the fastest RN possible. There are tons of programs that will allow you in an MSN program with your background (many of them part-time and online)....then you will have an advanced nursing degree which means much more than the BSN...because you are right about what the BS stands for...

    Good luck with your schedule. I think you will find it to be well worth the effort!
  6. by   kenni
    I am sick of this discussion, and every time it seems like the ADNs are talking down about BSN like it's a waste of money! I am currently a BSN student, and I have much respect for the ADNs, LVNs, and techs I work with and would never say that their education was a waste of time (unless they purposely did the ADN then went back to BSN. I feel like they took 2 nursing student spots to end up with the same license.)
    Any how, where I'm from, it depends on where you want to go & what you want to do. here, ADNs can only do bedside nursing or clinic work. they can't do research, occupational, pharmaceutical, educational, or any other stuff like that. personally, I don't want to do bedside nursing for my entire career. I eventually want to have an 8-5 monday thru friday with holidays off and still make decent money. I started to do the ADN, but I'm happy where I am. ultimately, it's more important to me that I just be a nurse.
  7. by   Cherish
    Quote from kenni
    I am sick of this discussion, and every time it seems like the ADNs are talking down about BSN like it's a waste of money! I am currently a BSN student, and I have much respect for the ADNs, LVNs, and techs I work with and would never say that their education was a waste of time (unless they purposely did the ADN then went back to BSN. I feel like they took 2 nursing student spots to end up with the same license.)
    Any how, where I'm from, it depends on where you want to go & what you want to do. here, ADNs can only do bedside nursing or clinic work. they can't do research, occupational, pharmaceutical, educational, or any other stuff like that. personally, I don't want to do bedside nursing for my entire career. I eventually want to have an 8-5 monday thru friday with holidays off and still make decent money. I started to do the ADN, but I'm happy where I am. ultimately, it's more important to me that I just be a nurse.

    I personally don't think I will be taking 2 peoples spots. If you have a diploma or ADN and go RN-BSN (WHY WOULD YOU APPLY TO TRADITIONAL BSN IF YOU ARE ALREADY AN RN???), you will be taking 1 spot. RN-BSN program you are ALREADY a Nurse. So that point you made really didn't make sense to me, but anywhoo. I was originally going the BSN route and used to think why would anyone go ADN or Diploma? But its a long wait to get into any of these programs where I live not to mention the BSN EACH college requests DIFFERENT pre-req's, so I figured why waste my money when I can apply to the Diploma program and start clinicals AS SOON as I'm in basically. Many people choose different routes for many reasons. Me I will be FULLY reimbursed for my diploma program PLUS have my RN-BSN FULLY paid for by my hospital. Yes I will become an RN for FREE. Yes it means I will be contracted for 3 yrs, but its also to a top teaching hospital here in North Carolina so its not that bad (they have a contract with the diploma school for FULL tuition reimbursement). I can get my BSN and work towards my goal of ICU work to later become a CRNA.
  8. by   gauge14iv
    Quote from kenni
    I am sick of this discussion, and every time it seems like the ADNs are talking down about BSN like it's a waste of money!
    This is not the discussion we were having here.

    The discussion that was taking place here was should this ONE individual bail out of an accelerated BS program and transfer to AD program. Please don't get the thread shut down for a debate that has occcurred everywhere else already.
  9. by   NurseKittyAtlanta
    What this person is asking makes no sense to me. She has already completed two years of the BSN program. It is unlikely that her credits will transfer to an ADN program, and so therefore she'd have to go through a two-year program to get her ADN. That would make a total of four years for the ADN! Why spend four years getting an ADN when she could just stay where she is and end up with a BSN in the same amount of time? I just don't understand this ...
  10. by   onlyhope
    I am sick of this discussion
    I'm not try to be a smart aleck but just exit out of the discussion if you are sick of it!
  11. by   twotrees2
    Quote from fleur-de-lis
    I am in semester 2 of a 4 semester accelerated BSN program. Right now I am kicking myself for not applying to the ADN program at my local CC. The more I learn, the more I feel like I am spinning my wheels with classes like Nursing Research and Theory. I am beginning to see that the BS in BSN does not only stand for bachelor of science (bad me - )!

    I am seriously considering applying to transfer to the ADN program after this semester is over. If I do this, I will have about $20,000 less in student loans, a great deal less stress and heartache, a life for the next year, and an RN either way! From what I can gather, depending on when they schedule the classes that I will need to finish the ADN program, I will either finish at the same time or maybe one semester late if they do not offer the classes I need in the summer.

    Now a bit about my reasons for looking into this. It is not grade related. I have a 4.0 currently and at worst I will finish this semester with one or 2 B's and the rest A's. I have no problem succeeding in this program - but at what cost? Since starting this program, I have injured my knee twice (not necessarily related to the program), been sick several times, and the migraines that I have not suffered from in years are back and kicking. My house looks like a tornado came through it, and the dust bunnies are taking over. I often emerge from my study coma to wonder who that handsome man in my living room is, then realize it is my husband! I own a horse who no longer remembers what I look like, and I recently sold another horse who I bred and raised from birth becuase I did not have time for her and it is not fair to ask my husband to do more than he already is (he works FT and is in school PT working on an associates in business). We don't have kids yet, but would like to someday soon, except that you have to actually have a relationship with your spouse for that to happen!!!

    I am committed to becoming an RN, I am just doubting my judgment on the route to get there. Has anyone done this, or do you have any advice for me?? What do you think??

    we had several come in to ours from a bsn program- they were happy they did hoewever they did say the work wsa twice as hard cause instead of learning in 4 yrs ( with all yor other classes a bsn takes intertwined with the nursing part) you cram it in 2. just what i have heard.
  12. by   twotrees2
    Quote from anne74
    Why would you drop out? You're already in the middle of a program - finish!

    In the long run, the ADN program will take you longer - meaning a longer time when you're not in the working world making money. You'll have to be on a waiting list to even get in. Then you might have to re-take some classes, because often classes don't exactly translate. Plus, the ADN program will not be any easier physically, and it can't be much easier mentally.

    I finished an accelerated BSN program - it hits a peak in the middle of the program, and then the last semester is the easiest. You're just in the thick of it now. Yes, many of the administrative/management type classes are a bunch of crap (especially for me, since I already had a business background) but in this job market today, the BSN will help you in the long run.

    Plus, with a BSN you have more options for jobs. The hospital I work at now only hires BSNs. And, many hospitals are forcing ADN's to go back and get their BSN within a certain time frame, or they'll lose their job. And I would think working as an ADN, while going to school at night to earn a BSN would really be hard. Just working takes a lot out of you, and I'd hate to have classes on top of that. Just get it over with now!

    The moral of the story is, you'll finish faster with a higher degree if you stay in the accelerated program. Sure - you might initally have more school loans to pay back, but you'll earn more money with a BSN, and you'll be done sooner, so you'll start earning a real paycheck sooner. You could lose a lot of money when you're sitting idle waiting to get into an ADN program - not to mention it takes longer to finish.

    I think if you dropped out of the BSN program, you'd regret it. Hang in there - you'll be done soon. It just sucks right now.

    And as a side -- if you think school is physically and emotionally stressful - just wait until your first year of nursing. That is a whole new level of stress. I found myself often wishing for the easy days of being in school. Not to freak you out, but to manage your expectations. I thought getting through school was tough - but my first year of nursing absolutely rocked my world.
    not always true youd make more with a bsn - my friend has a bsn and she made only about 2 bucks more an hour than me and that was only because she was pm supervisor - depends on your area.

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