NA's not professionals - page 3

I was the recipient of a complaint yesterday from another employee. An NA told me she had been called off before her shift and told on the phone that instead of having her work, the floor would run... Read More

  1. by   NursingAgainstdaOdds
    I'd like to steer clear of the debate which has taken place on the thread and just address the OP.

    It really seems that there was just a misunderstanding, and the reason for the misunderstanding is at the heart of the issue being debated here. While the aide may be very knowledgeable in patient care and demonstrate a high degree of professionalism (adjective), the aide has not received the education to be a professional (noun), or even to know that such a debate exists. I think the manager is correct - the aide needs to know what is meant by professional (noun) vs professional (adjective). It would likely also help to explain the education one receives in nursing school with regards to this issue, that there is A LOT of backstory. Also, as has been stated previously - reinforcing the difference between a vocation and a profession, and reinforcing how the terms are used in the industry.
  2. by   Kunzieo
    Yeah...I agree...
    The CNA was offended because she thought she was being called unprofessional. She's probably (rightfully) proud of the work she does, and thought that she was being looked down upon by the nursing staff.
    I wouldn't tell the manager which CNA said it, that isn't really important.

    I don't mind somebody saying that a CNA isn't a professional...but I will say this...there is nothing I hate MORE than being called a TECH!
    Ugh. Gross. I am not a Patient Care Technician (or however any facility words it.) WTH does that even mean? There are no technical skills involved in my work. I am a Nursing Assistant. I assist with nursing cares.
  3. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from Kunzieo
    WTH does that even mean? There are no technical skills involved in my work. I am a Nursing Assistant. I assist with nursing cares.
    As if the people you care for are electronic equipment.
  4. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    It's different in dialysis, there are no CNAs- the UAPs are called pt care technicians, and their badges all have this title on them. They do work with machines and do a lot of technical/mechanical type of work. They work w/ pts, as well.
  5. by   Kunzieo
    Suesquatch-I know, right?
    Hellllllo Nurse- that's ok then...but some facilities/nurses refer to ALL CNAs as Techs...that I don't like.
    Last edit by Kunzieo on Nov 16, '07 : Reason: had to add the second part.
  6. by   NursingAgainstdaOdds
    I never realized that "Patient Care Technician" could be offensive to some who work in this capacity. I always though the title "Patient Care Technician" seemed a little more diplomatic, as it didn't justify the individual's role with regard to the nurse's role, which indicates they are inferior to the nurse.
  7. by   Kunzieo
    Quote from NursingAgainstdaOdds
    I never realized that "Patient Care Technician" could be offensive to some who work in this capacity. I always though the title "Patient Care Technician" seemed a little more diplomatic, as it didn't justify the individual's role with regard to the nurse's role, which indicates they are inferior to the nurse.


    No...I don't regard CNA or even NA as offensive, because the title is NURSING assistant...as in I assist with nursing care. Not a NURSE'S assistant (even though I am) which then does sound inferior. I just don't like Tech. It sounds so impersonal.
  8. by   NursingAgainstdaOdds
    Quote from Kunzieo
    No...I don't regard CNA or even NA as offensive, because the title is NURSING assistant...as in I assist with nursing care. Not a NURSE'S assistant (even though I am) which then does sound inferior. I just don't like Tech. It sounds so impersonal.
    Ah, I see. Good point.
  9. by   Athenas83
    Quote from StanleyRW
    If being a tech is not professional because nurses work is harder, then I would venture to say nurses aren't professional because being a surgeon is harder.... Yeah, it's not right is it? It's offensive too.
    .
    People do hard work all the time. I don't see where learning another language has anything to do with this thread. Also, an RN isn't called a "doctor assistant." Two separate professions.
  10. by   NursesRFun
    I am a CNA. I am also an LVN. I am also a BSN student. These all took my time and effort to accomplish. CNA's are certified. They do the grunt work that the LVNs and RNs don't have time for or just plain DONT WANT TO DO. a good CNA could be a great asset to an LVN/RN. They can alert you if something isn't right right away. They deserve the respect of being called a professional.

    We are forgetting how MOST nursing schools started. Their training began just like CNA training- on the floor. IT was a Certificate program, run by Hospitals, not Colleges or Universities. You don't always have to have a 2 year or 4 year degree to be a "professional".
  11. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from NursesRFun
    I am a CNA. I am also an LVN. I am also a BSN student. These all took my time and effort to accomplish. CNA's are certified. They do the grunt work that the LVNs and RNs don't have time for or just plain DONT WANT TO DO. a good CNA could be a great asset to an LVN/RN. They can alert you if something isn't right right away. They deserve the respect of being called a professional.

    We are forgetting how MOST nursing schools started. Their training began just like CNA training- on the floor. IT was a Certificate program, run by Hospitals, not Colleges or Universities. You don't always have to have a 2 year or 4 year degree to be a "professional".

    Yes, nursing programs did not start in colleges- and nurses were not officially accepted into the professional world until they did.

    The Wikipedia post explains all that.
  12. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    No one is saying CNAs are not valuable. I was a CNA myself for years. CNAs are not considered professionals in the noun sense of the word. This is a fact. Check your BON. Why is this plain and simple fact so offensive and hard to understand?


    Types of nurses

    Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) usually have eighteen months to two years of training in anatomy and physiology, medications, and practical patient care.
    Licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) is a title used in some states which is roughly equivalent to Licensed practical nurse.
    Registered nurses (RNs) are professional nurses who often supervise the tasks performed by LPNs, orderlies, and nursing assistants. They provide direct care and make decisions regarding plans of care for individuals and groups of healthy, ill, and injured people. RNs are the largest healthcare occupation in the U.S.
    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are registered nurses with advanced education, knowledge, skills, and scope of practice. They perform primary health care, provide mental health services, diagnose and prescribe, carry out research, and educate the public and other professionals


    http://209.85.165.104/search?q=cache...lnk&cd=9&gl=us
    Last edit by Hellllllo Nurse on Nov 16, '07
  13. by   bethin
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I do not understand why you are taking offense. By definition, the nurse is a professional. No emotions connected, just fact.

    I've been a CNA and was taught that from the get-go.

    Could you please explain why you are offended by that?
    Like I stated in my first post, professional can be the way you behave.

    A few weekends ago, the nursing supervisor pulled me aside and told me that I "sure am professional". In this context, it's an adjective to describe my behavior not my education (or lack of).

    Semantics, yes, but I've always been picky.

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