My orientee gave the wrong narcotic

  1. 0 So, I had an orientee on my hall the one night and everything was going very well. She passed the 1600s and I the 2000s. Toward the end of the shift the narc count was off and upon closer inspection we determined that the wrong pain pill was given to the wrong resident (the dosages were not the same, but the pill itself was). I am worried about what is going to occur and how it will occur. I'm just wondering if I am the one who should be reprimanded for the medication error (seeing as she was under my responsibility), or if she will (which I would hope would not be the case).
  2. Visit  JohnD91 profile page

    About JohnD91

    Joined May '13; Posts: 3.

    25 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  chrisrn24 profile page
    1
    Hmm...well as long as nothing terrible happens to the patient I can't imagine you both getting into much trouble. Mistakes happen...

    How closely were you supervising her at the time?
    jtmarcy12 likes this.
  4. Visit  NurseOnAMotorcycle profile page
    0
    She is a nurse? Or medication trained aide? Then it is her own write up. At the time of the med error you need to show her the report protocols so she can tell the MD it happened and get orders. She's registered (or certified) in her own right and is responsible for her own errors.
  5. Visit  JohnD91 profile page
    0
    This I cannot recall. It was a busy time of the shift and there were many residents requesting my aid.
  6. Visit  JohnD91 profile page
    0
    Quote from NurseOnAMotorcycle
    She is a nurse? Or medication trained aide? Then it is her own write up. At the time of the med error you need to show her the report protocols so she can tell the MD it happened and get orders. She's registered (or certified) in her own right and is responsible for her own errors.
    Yes, she is an LPN.
  7. Visit  WeepingAngel profile page
    1
    Eeek. Better keep a close eye on your orientee. I am confused as to how the dose could be different but you said it was the same pill?
    psu_213 likes this.
  8. Visit  avionrn profile page
    3
    I had a co-worker with a similar experience. The preceptor was written up and not the orientee. They justified the write-up by explaining the preceptor was ultimately the responsible nurse to oversee the orientee's work. When I precept, I have a rule that I always double check the narcotics prior to being given. I know this can take extra time on the preceptor's part, but it does prevent errors. I would look at it as a lesson learned for both.
    Esme12, jtmarcy12, and uRNmyway like this.
  9. Visit  chrisrn24 profile page
    1
    Quote from WeepingAngel
    Eeek. Better keep a close eye on your orientee. I am confused as to how the dose could be different but you said it was the same pill?
    Maybe like oxycodone 5 mg was given when the order was for oxycodone 2.5 mg?
    KelRN215 likes this.
  10. Visit  HouTx profile page
    4
    Nope. Every licensed person is accountable for their own mistakes - especially for something so basic as medication "5 Rights".
    AJJKRN, Meriwhen, BrandonLPN, and 1 other like this.
  11. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    6
    If she were an unlicensed student, that would be one thing. However, she holds licensure, so she's responsible for giving meds safely under her scope of practice. It's not as if it were something particular to your unit or hospital; giving meds safely is the same everywhere.
    KelRN215, nurse671, rn/writer, and 3 others like this.
  12. Visit  WeepingAngel profile page
    0
    Quote from chrisrn24
    Maybe like oxycodone 5 mg was given when the order was for oxycodone 2.5 mg?
    I realized afterward 'Twas a bit slow on the uptake there.
  13. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    0
    Quote from HouTx
    Nope. Every licensed person is accountable for their own mistakes - especially for something so basic as medication "5 Rights".
    This is true. But, this is referring only to how the OP could be held responsible from a legal/licensure/BON perspective. The facility might very well hold a preceptor jointly responsible for the med errors of his/her orientee. (unfair and short-sighted in my opinion, but it's possible)

    In other words, the OP can't lose her license based on this, but she could very well be reprimanded, depending on the policies of the facility.
  14. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    4
    Highly doubtful. If the HR department has done its due diligence and hired this person, the preceptor has a right to assume a basic level of competence, including safe medication administration.
    psu_213, AJJKRN, amoLucia, and 1 other like this.


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