My Degree - a "piece of paper?" - page 2

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Originally posted by sWolfie: Nobody is better then anyone else. Just because you went to school/college for a piece of paper. I am pretty new here, actually just graduated with an ADN yesterday, but I have to say something... Read More


  1. 0
    yep ... a very expensive piece of paper with a lot of work behind it.


    Remember that even the slug nurses have a piece of paper too and what you do with the knowledge you have attained makes the nurse you are or are to become.

    good luck in all,
    Jared
  2. 0
    Eloquently said. Please remember Jenny's words: Guard your license; take care of yourself. Have fun!
  3. 0
    Laura,

    It takes time to know whether a patient is in a bad situation or not. Don't ever hesitate to try and ask somebody else on your unit, to take a look at someone. VS are NOT the only indator of a potentially bad situation. Why do I say this? Remember the two most common reasons for nnurses to get sued:

    #1 - "Failure to monitor" - Always at least pop in, and eyeball your patients.....do a quick GCS or something in your head.

    #2 - "Failure to Advise" - Whe you are concerned, or think there is a problem with the patient, that is life threatening, or may cause lifelong/permanent injury/disability........call the physician......even if he yells at you and is an irrate arrogant one!

    Just some thoughts.......there is a reason why those are the 2 top reasons for nurses being involved or blamed in a suite. The "peice of paper" is meaningless without a license.

  4. 0
    Excellant post! 10 years out of nursing school now and can still distinctly remember the feeling of being able to read a book for pleasure, never had time in nursing school. Or the panic I would feel when watching TV or some other mindless activity and would suddenly think, HOMEWORK! then remember I didn't have to do it anymore. I get very defensive over my license, when I was at the end of my first semester my then husband was stationed with the Air Force at a different location. I checked with the nursing schools in Northern Michigan where we were headed and each only had a ladder program requiring me to start over into an LPN to RN program. Something I was not willing to do. So me and my young children stayed where we were, 4 hours south of where my husband was stationed. I lived apart from him for a year and a half, kids were 5 and 3 at the time this started. Without the help of my parents I would not have made it. I worked three 12 hour shifts a week at the hospital after my first year of school as a nurse extern because we were not making it financially. I also took my prereqs with my nursing, 18 to 20 credit hours a semester. These were the longest two years of my life and perhaps some of the most difficult. When I see a CNA tell me I did it for a piece of paper it infuriates me. I do not pretend to be a physician, why do some CNAs seem to feel it is ok to call themselves a nurse. I may not call myself a physician. Personally I feel that there should be a national nurse practice act, instead of state to state. With firm and clear guidelines, disallowing anyone that is not licensed to do nursing procedures. That includes passing meds, dressing wounds, inserting foleys, doing accuchecks etc... I do not expect to do my job under a physicians license, why is it ok for unlicensed people to do nursing duties under my license? Why do we give away our professional obligations to others? What other profession can anyone think of that allows that?
    Please do not think that this means I do not value what unlicensed personnel do, it simply means that I do not believe that unlicensed personnel should be allowed to do anything that takes nursing education and skills, anymore than I think I should be allowed to diagnosis and treat like a physician. To me to think otherwise is like saying the handyman that can put in some wiring can call himself an electrician.
    To all new nurses CONGRATS AND WELCOME!


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