My Body Is Not My Resume: Exploring Nursing Dress Codes - page 4

Let's talk dress code. I am certain that everyone has an opinion on this topic. We can discuss nursing whites versus colors or clogs versus gym shoes, but that is just too mundane! Let's dig deeper. ... Read More

  1. by   nursemaryzzel
    Quote from Wuzzie
    And don't get me started on the "I just rolled out of bed and put my hair in a messy bun" thing. While I don't think we should be sporting french twists, looking like you just had sex or are about to play field hockey is so wrong. And no, adding a stretchy headband does not improve the look.
    I have to disagree here. I wear my hair in a messy bun/simple ponytail most days for work with a stretchy headband to glam it up a bit and keep my hair out of my face and I don't feel as if I look unprofessional by any means. I actually think adding a headband is a quick fix to otherwise drab hair. Speaking for myself, I don't get much time to do my hair so I think it's perfectly acceptable to wear my hair the same way I would if I were about to play field hockey because let's face it...nursing can get just as rough!
  2. by   SobreRN
    No visible tattoos allowed in jail it would appear given the number of deputies wearing compression stockings on their arms. We really are not engaging in any personal chit chat so no conversation starters. Do not have any tattoos but have been pondering getting a bit of later life ink...
    would make staff easier to locate, some inmates have had associates on the outside track down staff as deputies go by their last names. Policy on medical dictates no visible tats and we do not give out our last names. Then again the BON lists the city we all live in and while it does not list an address it would take someone 2-3 minutes to walk around town and find someone who knows me.
  3. by   TanyaS57
    i had pink hair for about 6 months. At first my patients looked at me with a funny look. But once I began talking to them and caring for them they realized I was a good nurse who just happened to have pink hair. My patients thought my hair was fun and it made them smile. Plus they all remembered me because I was the nurse with pink hair. My management had no problem with it. They just said you are the type that can get away with that.
  4. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from cyc0sys
    I hate the whites. I don't own a scrub top that doesn't have a stain. In fact, I'd like to give a big, long throat hug to the person who decided that was a good idea at my facility.

    I really don't care about hair, tats, piercings, etc. Back in the day, it was strictly a biker, outlaw, military, or fetish sort of thing. Never mainstream. It's trendy now and nothings going to change the demand for nurses in the foreseeable future.
    Big, long throat hug? Not sure I understand the reference, but the mental picture is entertaining and I agree with the sentiment.

    Let those who like white WEAR white, but please don't force anyone else to do so!
  5. by   FullGlass
    I applied for a mental health job. After the initial phone interview went well, the employer asked me to do an interview via video conference. After that was over, I asked them why they requested that. Answer: "This is a mental health facility in a conservative area. We've flown people all the way out here for interviews and had them show up with facial tattoos and/or multiple facial piercings. That could be really upsetting to some patients. We just wanted to make sure you looked normal."
  6. by   TruvyNurse
    I am a tattooed nurse. Yes a few are visible..even more aren't. For the most part, I get a curious and positive reception from patients. Now there is a line to be drawn...I think multiple facial piercings and those darn ear stretching gauges are not appropriate for the floor.
  7. by   BlueShoes12
    Personally, it doesn't bother me unless it's an obviously offensive tattoo (something depicting violence or racism, for instance). One of my nursing instructor had a full sleeve and colored streaks in her hair... it looked great and she had no complaints from patients. I have a tattoo and multiple piercings, although the only ones that are visible are in my ears. I've sported a pixie cut and had multi-colored hair... nobody minded!

    It's technically against the dress code at the hospital where I work, but the enforcement varies wildly from unit to unit depending on the manager. Some units at the hospital where I work have a strictly enforced dress code right down to the color of your scrubs and undershirts, but the step-down ICU is pretty laid-back. I usually wear scrub pants and a long-sleeved athletic type shirt in varying colors.
  8. by   Cat365
    I have multi-colored hair. However, I have long hair and when I had it done I stated I wanted to look professional at work and not like a clown. I always wear a bun at work, so my hair now has multi-colored streaks for the last two-thirds and at work I have a colorful bun. I have had patients ask if it is really my hair or some sort of extension.

    I believe in balance. (I also work nights in an ER, so that probably helps.) Do I believe that I should be able to go to work with full sleeve tattoos (some of which I actually like), twelve visible piercings, or all green hair? Not so much.

    I do happen to live in a fairly conservative area of the country.
    Last edit by Cat365 on Jan 19
  9. by   Kitiger
    Quote from nursemaryzzel
    I have to disagree here. I wear my hair in a messy bun/simple ponytail most days for work with a stretchy headband to glam it up a bit and keep my hair out of my face and I don't feel as if I look unprofessional by any means. I actually think adding a headband is a quick fix to otherwise drab hair. Speaking for myself, I don't get much time to do my hair so I think it's perfectly acceptable to wear my hair the same way I would if I were about to play field hockey because let's face it...nursing can get just as rough!
    What do you see as "professional"? What impression do you want to make? Do you care?

    Do you want to look harried, like someone who is so stressed that they can't even comb their hair?

    First impressions do count, whether or not you think they should. If your patients see you as someone who is composed, they are more likely to see you as knowledgeable and proficient. They are more likely to trust you.
  10. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Kitiger
    What do you see as "professional"? What impression do you want to make? Do you care?

    Do you want to look harried, like someone who is so stressed that they can't even comb their hair?

    First impressions do count, whether or not you think they should. If your patients see you as someone who is composed, they are more likely to see you as knowledgeable and proficient. They are more likely to trust you.
    The post you quoted -- where the poster defended sporting the "Just rolled out of bed" look floored me. I don't care if someone is wearing a full face of make-up or has their hair in an elaborate updo, but please comb the danged hair and put it up neatly. Someone who looks professional and put-together inspires a lot more respect (and trust) than someone who hasn't bothered.
  11. by   nursemaryzzel
    Quote from Kitiger
    What do you see as "professional"? What impression do you want to make? Do you care?

    Do you want to look harried, like someone who is so stressed that they can't even comb their hair?

    First impressions do count, whether or not you think they should. If your patients see you as someone who is composed, they are more likely to see you as knowledgeable and proficient. They are more likely to trust you.
    Obviously I comb my hair, but nursing is all about practicality. Keeping it pulled back and out of your face is neat enough for me. I do care about my appearance, but the great thing about nursing is that it isn't a beauty pageant, so I can wear my loose ponytails and messy buns with pride and confidence that I still project the appearance of someone who puts patients above vanity.

    Most days, my look consists of a ponytail, clean scrubs (no time to press them usually), and a smile. Maybe a bit of makeup if I feel up to it. But I am not at work to impress my patients, colleagues, doctors--anyone. I'm there to help heal. Doesn't matter whether I do it with a fancy updo or a messy bun!
  12. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    As I said before I have no issue at all with tattoos so long as they aren't hateful or explicitly sexual. However, the acid test for this I think should be what the patients think. Patient's have preferences and prejudices. I think some should not be entertained for example if they are racist or homophobic. I do not put the personal expression of body art in that same category. Anyway, I'm not King of the Nursing Universe but that's my opinion on this rainy morning in Pittsburgh. Be well all & root against the hated Patsies.
  13. by   brownbook
    Logic and human emotions are so crazy. I think I could accept a health care professional with tattoos, facial jewelry etc. since I'd have the knowledge to know if they were competent, and overlook their "body.....resume".

    However I have two pit bulls and sometimes watch Pitbulls and Paroles. I love that they advocate for pit bulls and parolees. But their just rolled out of bed, tattoos, piercings, etc., really bother me!

    I think, just what pit bills need as their spokesperson, someone who looks like they belong to a street gang!

close