MSDS and hand lotion - page 3

by tntrn

11,682 Unique Views | 28 Comments

At our staff meeting yesterday we were told that hand lotions can no longer be kept in our report room unless we have the corresponding information stored in our MSDS binder. Just how ridiculous are the rules and regs... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from tntrn
    While I completely respect the need for handwashing, I think it's really impossible to comply as they might want you to do. For example, when you are working with a sick babe, how do you manage to wash your hands between the time when you open the isolette (when using one of the covered ones) and when you then care for the baby? Or if using one of the open ones, how do you manage to wash your hands between the time when you lower one of the sides and when you care for the baby?
    I said that we have to wash our hands between touching different babies' bedsides, not when we're within one baby's area. Of course you can touch the things in that baby's area and touch the baby as well. I mean that if I'm in the middle of caring for one baby, and another's alarm goes off, I have to wash my hands before even touching the other baby's monitor to silence the alarm, whether I'm going to be touching the actual baby or not. Or when we use the computers, phones, copy machines - those things aren't within a baby's bedside and are used by many people, so we do wash our hands after using something like that.
  2. 0
    We usually have eucerin in our unit, we don't use the fragrant ones because it isn't good for the little ones. We can also use Aveeno if you don't like Eucerin. We can also have drinks, but they have to be in a container with lids, not at the bedside. We can have them on the cart in the front of the room or on the counter of an unoccupied bedspace. The way our unit is set up, thankyou stupid person that designed it, our locker rooms are on another unit and our lunch room is down a corridor. So they finally allowed us to have lidded water bottles in the unit. Parents may also bring a lidded bottle for ice water.
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    I believe the MSDS requirement for lotion may be an OSHA issue. Our clinic recently underwent a consult with state OSH reps and they said that lotion that is available to all employees must have an MSDS form. They did say that if the employee has their own in thier desk or other personal area out of reach of any other employee then an MSDS is not required. That was just one of a long list of rediculous regulations...
  4. 0
    I don't wash my hands very often- before you freak out- lol, let me tell you what I do.

    I keep a bottle of alcohol hand gel with me at all times, and use it between each pt contact. I clean off the bottle several times a day using the gel. I also use alcohol wipes to clean my pens, etc. several times a day.

    The alcohol gel works so well for me, that I don't need to use lotion at work anymore.
  5. 0
    Bitty Baby Grower: Were our units designed by the same lame architects? Our new, "state of the art" unit is the worst designed place imaginable. We were asked for a floorplan, and in the end, it is my belief that the corporation had these (bad) plans laying around that they'd paid too much money for and doggone it, we're going to use them!

    We have one nurse's station placed at approximately the 50 yard line. No staff phones anywhere but there, one ice machine, also at the 50. No scrub sinks at the nurse's station. Also no drinking fountain. The NICU has no drinking fountain, bathroom facility for the nurse who is often trapped there alone. We have one med room. You guessed it, on the 50. It's very easy to track 5 miles or more on a busy 8 hour shift, especially if you have patient rooms that are located at either goal line. One of our nurses wore a pedometer several times just to find out.

    We do have some of the foam hand cleaners in every room now, but that has proven to be just as drying and damaging to my hands as the soap and water. I might try my own brand of that. This morning, my hands feel like sandpaper.

    In the pursuit of promoting health among the populace, we destroy our own, and worse than that, the medical powers that be, require it. I think this bothers me as much as the actual physical negatives.
  6. 0
    Quote from cheerfuldoer
    Can anyone say "Communism has made its way into healthcare at last?" :angryfire

    I've worked places where they tell you what kind of lotion to NOT use, and places that forbid bottled water or any other means of hydrating oneself at the nurses station. First, we can't go potty, take breaks, or eat UNLESS "our work is caught up" orrrrrrrrrrrr.........."we find another FREE nurse to cover for us"........now we are forbidden to use handlotion or drink water on duty at the nurses station??????????????

    Well........this is what I think of that:

    *%&$^@!#$*%^%*##&@!!! :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire

    LOL! yes Renee...I agree...so much of this seems to be a strong arm attempt to control NURSES as a group, and direct/dictate to us us at every turn.

    Sometimes I get the sense management is really frightened we will organize and rise up against them...like democracy against communism.

    What we could accomplish ...if only we could unite....I dream.
  7. 0
    Quote from tntrn
    We do have some of the foam hand cleaners in every room now, but that has proven to be just as drying and damaging to my hands as the soap and water. I might try my own brand of that. This morning, my hands feel like sandpaper.
    Our unit uses an antibacterial hand gel from Richmond Labratories, called Stat-Rinse. If your hands are already broken down, then of course it will sting as it is alcohol-based. BUT if your hands are intact, it's actually really nice. There is an emmolliant in it that protects your hands. I use it much more often than washing with soap and water, and it's actually what our ID told us to do - like 1 hand wash to 10 "gel washes"

    Maybe you guys could trial it? The same brand also makes a lotion, the one I referred to before, and it's pretty decent stuff.
  8. 0
    Quote from mattsmom81
    LOL! yes Renee...I agree...so much of this seems to be a strong arm attempt to control NURSES as a group, and direct/dictate to us us at every turn.

    Sometimes I get the sense management is really frightened we will organize and rise up against them...like democracy against communism.

    What we could accomplish ...if only we could unite....I dream.
    Yeah, I can picture the organized nurses movement on the move in me head right now:uhoh21: ..........The nurses are coming, the nurses are coming....what will we do when the nurses rise and speak for themselves!!! NURSE POWER!!! Yahooooooooo!!!
  9. 0
    Quote from barefootlady
    Don't laugh but I did work at a place that instructed nurses on what type of panties to wear. I actually sat in a staff meeting and was lectured on the proper type of undies. I thought I was being as approiate as the presenter when I asked: 1. How this improved patient care? 2. Was the panty police going to be assigned daily or was it an honor system?
    I too have sat through one of those staff meetings. What type of undies we are to wear is actually documented in our dress code/written policy.


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