Most shocking experience on clinical -while in nursing school...:can any one relate? - page 3

Hi Nurses I will never ever forget an experience i had while in nursing school clinicals. I was assigned to bed A and when I got there to do my assessment I was over come with fear of what i... Read More

  1. by   kendel
    Quote from oramar
    there are some diseases that cause bizarre apparences including sharp teeth

    wow i didnt know that
  2. by   kendel
    Quote from iwillbanRN
    If someone is looking at you with eyes that remind you of polstergeist, I would run out of the room too..... there is no way that I would introduce myself. You never know what is going on in those pts. minds, they could just come up and hurt you.
    remember a couple of years back a pt killed a nurse and a doctor in france?
    follow your gut, if you are uncomfortable with the pt, go in with a co-worker.
    Dear "i will be an RN",

    Thank you so much because that was just how i felt and thats why i shared this story because i have never in my life come across any experience like that even to this day.
    every now and then I remember it.

    and it was purely gut instinct with fear i cant explain and that i have never felt before that made me want to run away from there.
  3. by   kendel
    Quote from catlynLPN
    I agree with the above post.
    She's just a student at this point and was just asking for other's experiences.
    No need to "eat" the girl and spit her out.

    thank you for understanding,... catlynLPN
  4. by   leslie :-D
    i've had pts who have scared the begeebeez out of me.
    i strategically made it a point to talk with them.
    it made them more 'human' to me.
    ca/disease, does some incredible things to the human appearance.
    and it's scary, no matter who you are.
    kendel, next time, take a deep breath, and talk to the pt.
    make deliberate eye contact.
    ask what you can do for him/her.
    i'm sure, sometime in your career, this will happen again.
    next time, you'll handle it.
    best of everything.

    leslie
  5. by   kendel
    Quote from JennyMac
    Did they give you an explanation as to why your patient was switched for the day?

    Hi Jenny Mac,

    at the time my pt was discharged but my professor did not know that
    so when i checked the id band it was the wrong pt and i was happy only because i was gripped with so much fear i had never experienced.
  6. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from TrudyRN
    I agree that we don't always get easy work in Nursing. However, this was a young student and she was having this experience for the first time so let's try to be a little more compassionate.
    Part of the reason I recoiled so was that the bio says the student is 35 y/o. When I first read the post I figured it was a very young person, like 18 or 19.
    Still, have to put our thoughts on straight and truckle onward.
  7. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from catlynLPN
    I thought it was a bit harsh telling her to "save the drama".........that's like telling her to keep it to herself and that she's not in high school anymore...that's childish.

    I didn't see it as a big deal that she asked others for their similar experiences.
    Gee, students have many different experiences ahead of them. What's the big deal about talking about it here?
    When the post described "alerting other students to what I saw," it is easy to get the impression that the deal had turned into a freak show, which is what I think a lot of people had issue with.

    The tone of the thread did seem rather dramatic and even elementary, though I will apologize for dismissing the OP's experience.
  8. by   bagladyrn
    I have to disagree here with those who are taking their fellow nurses to taks for their replies to the OP. I do see a certain element of "drama" in OP's posts: references to how she "freaked out", to images from the "exorcist" "I could have had a heart attack" and "I couldn't deal with what I saw"
    In the "real world" of nursing you cannot refuse to care for a patient because his appearance disturbs you. He still deserves nursing care. A student who has a problem dealing with a patient is not acting properly in running to other students to tell them all about it (and garner sympathy for their dramatics and sensitive feelings). The appropriate course is to ask your instructor (paging them if off the floor) or the responsible staff nurse to assist you in dealing with it.
    The "old school" nursing instructors I remember would have made sure the student was assigned to care for that patient until they had worked through their issues (and probably written a paper on the condition), not to be cruel, but to improve them and help them grow as a nurse.
    This is not one of the "nice" answers and sympathy you may have been seeking from your post, but meant to give you something to think through.
  9. by   Penny8611
    Quote from motorcycle mama
    But he also used to be someone's sweet baby boy.
    Thank you for this.
  10. by   kendel
    Quote from bagladyrn
    I have to disagree here with those who are taking their fellow nurses to taks for their replies to the OP. I do see a certain element of "drama" in OP's posts: references to how she "freaked out", to images from the "exorcist" "I could have had a heart attack" and "I couldn't deal with what I saw"
    In the "real world" of nursing you cannot refuse to care for a patient because his appearance disturbs you. He still deserves nursing care. A student who has a problem dealing with a patient is not acting properly in running to other students to tell them all about it (and garner sympathy for their dramatics and sensitive feelings). The appropriate course is to ask your instructor (paging them if off the floor) or the responsible staff nurse to assist you in dealing with it.
    The "old school" nursing instructors I remember would have made sure the student was assigned to care for that patient until they had worked through their issues (and probably written a paper on the condition), not to be cruel, but to improve them and help them grow as a nurse.
    This is not one of the "nice" answers and sympathy you may have been seeking from your post, but meant to give you something to think through.
    bagladyrn ,
    you just dont get it do u

    it was an experience in my first year of nursing

    i am finished with this topic now

    enough is enough
    i dont need to be scolded on an experience i had
    if u read the post u can see it
    thank god some people were smart enough to get it and i explained my self already

    check the topic

    enough is enough
    if i follow you... i cant be my self or express my experince

    truly some nurses eat their young

    maybe one day you may have a experience where it may not be what i saw

    it may be some one is coming after you and you can stand there and smile while they attack you and u can ignore your gut response and when u post on here you will be attacked for defending your self


    i am deleting myself from this thread as of now this is my last post

    ENOUGH IS ENOUGH


    Thanks to every one for their honest opinion but its time to let it goooooooo
  11. by   leslie :-D
    kendel, if you want this thread closed, you can request it from a mod.

    leslie
  12. by   Becca608
    I was really interested in this thread since I do paranormal research as a hobby. In response to the OP, there are alot of medical conditions that can cause the features/behaviors that were described. Some people even have those changes made cosmetically (like having their teeth filed) or cause the behaviors (drug use, not taking prescribed psychotrophic meds, seizures, etc).

    Fear is a natural thing and we have a gut instinct for a reason. However, as nurses, we must sometimes overcome it and give the patient the best care that we can no matter how we feel. If we are truly having an issue with a patient, then this should be taken to the nurse manager (or clinical instructor) directly so it can be dealt with in a healthy manner.

    As the thread went on, my 'hoax hackles' went up. I agree with some of the posters that felt like this individual was about 18 or 19 years old. I find it very difficult to believe that some of 'Kendel's' responses were being made by someone 35 years of age (only 4 years younger than myself). The OP also talks as if this were a past experience while in nursing school. It seems more likely that since the OP was not aware of the anomalies that can cause what was seen, that the individual has either not started nursing school or is not very far into the program. And of course to go and 'warn' one's classmates in such a manner would be a HIPAA violation and would have been harshly dealt with by the clinical instructor.

    I am not trying to 'chew up' a fellow nursing student here and your experience was, I am sure, very real; however, your presentation of what occurred and your follow-up responses (especially the last post) are not consistent with what is taught in nursing schools. The critical thinking that one acquires in nursing school is not present and this is evidenced by your scattered and overly defensive responses.

    And by the way, I have run into all kinds of nurses and I do not believe that nurses are out 'to eat their young'. I do believe that some nurses tend to challenge new nurses more and I appreciate the opportunity to learn from them so that I might one day be as talented and intuitive as they are.

    This is a public forum and we all have to understand that from time to time someone will post that is not legitimate. I am not saying that is the case here, but given the OP's behavior, I have to wonder.

    Last, but not least, 'possession' is very rare and those that are perfectly 'possessed' can not be identified so easily. Someone should lay off the horror movies that give the Hollywood version of what the phenomenon really is.
  13. by   canoehead
    The weirdest looking patients are the most interesting, in my experience.

close