most non-caring branch of nursing - page 3

What field is most non-caring branch of nursing?... Read More

  1. by   nursingnurse2b1
    I only meant like more like practical focused than caring/nurturing. Didn't mean like not-caring.
    Last edit by nursingnurse2b1 on Nov 22
  2. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from nursingnurse2b1
    I only meant like more like practical focused than caring/nurturing. Didn't mean like not-caring.
    Then you mean more technical vs comfort-providing?
  3. by   ~♪♫ in my ♥~
    Quote from nursingnurse2b1
    I only meant like more like practical focused than caring/nurturing. Didn't mean like not-caring.
    If I'm understanding you correctly, the ED tends to fall more in this category than inpatient wards and units.

    The ED tends to be intervention focused: "treat 'em and street 'em," is a quip that you sometimes hear. We don't do care plans and we don't do acuity scores. We don't spend extended time with out patients (boarders notwithstanding); the ED is a time-limited encounter focused on an immediate set of acute complaints. For the most part, ED nurses tend to not rate highly on the patient-nurturing scale.



    Note: In the above, when I mention what "we" do or don't do, I'm referring only to my personal experience in 4 California emergency departments over the last 10 years and the many dozens of ED nurses with whom I've worked. Obviously, others may have different experiences.
  4. by   KatieMI
    Quote from peachtea
    sorry for the weird question, but what's the bean counter?
    Someone who has no vision field outside of written rules, however ridiculous they might be. Someone who has to be shown a piece of paper with a signature of his boss to recognize the fact of your existence.

    Such examples happen in every human occupation, not only in nursing.
  5. by   Racer15
    Quote from nursingnurse2b1
    I only meant like more like practical focused than caring/nurturing. Didn't mean like not-caring.
    The ED fits that description...kind of. We get monthly reports on our fluff em and puff em scores. We are expected to be kind, gentle, accommodating waitresses thanks to press ganey. Don't get me wrong. I am more than happy to get pillows, warm blankets, help reposition a patient, whatever I can do to make them comfortable during their ER visit. When I have time. Which is not always the case. There are also certain screening protocols in place now *coughsepsiscough* that are taking away clinical nursing judgment which is frustrating. The newer nurses in our unit like the new sepsis guidelines because (this is not a slam on new nurses because I was one once) it takes some responsibility off of their shoulders, but it drives me fricking insane to screen someone sepsis positive when they are not.
  6. by   Susie2310
    Quote from Flatline
    Just my perspective that I developed as I started working with more and more senior leaders. I used to think bean counters were all nurse/patient hating jerks until I started interfacing with them more. Turns out most of them are just as compassionate as any other floor nurse that I work with, they just have a different perspective.
    On the subject of that "different perspective" held by senior leaders you work with that is just as compassionate as any other floor nurse you work with; the "different perspective" I see most among senior leadership is "patient care must = profit," often in the guise of compassion and with a paternalistic approach towards patients.
    Last edit by Susie2310 on Nov 23
  7. by   kbrn2002
    I don't think any area of nursing can be defined as non-caring. If you mean more clinical detachment and less touchy-feely emotional go to the OR where your patients are already knocked out before you see them and most of the updates/communication with the families is done by the surgeon. Avoid psych, mom-baby, peds and geriatrics at all costs.
  8. by   MegD,MS,NP
    Did you have a bad day? Nursing = caring.
  9. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from nursingnurse2b1
    I only meant like more like practical focused than caring/nurturing. Didn't mean like not-caring.
    I'm having trouble thinking of an area of nursing that isn't at least moderately focused on practicality. In general, I think nurses tend to lean towards being fairly practical and utilitarian, especially after a few years of experience.
  10. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from mrsboots87
    Haha. When you find that golden goose of a job, please share with the rest of us.

    My best guess would be maybe OR. Since your patient is asleep.
    And you don't have to deal with family members. Nor must you get to know patients. A lot of nurses thrive on getting to know them, of course, but some don't like that. If you don't, the OR is a great choice.
  11. by   TakuRN
    Flight Nursing, maybe? Out there in the field working along side the medics.

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