Misdirected aggression - page 3

by malenurseFl 5,113 Views | 29 Comments

When someone asks you what you do for a living, do you hesitate? I'm a nurse and an R.N. next year. It's gotten so I don't like to tell people that I'm a nurse. Instead of friendliness or even indifference I'm greeted with anger... Read More


  1. 1
    I'm accustomed to riding on airplanes and listening to people seated next to me tell me about their entire health history once I've revealed my profession. I feel like it puts people more at ease when they hear the word "nurse", although I am generalizing, I admit.
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.
  2. 0
    I was in my college's bookstore searching for something and a man asked me what I was majoring in. I mentioned Liberal Arts, which made his face sour. When I added Nursing, he was blushing and smiling.

    I thought that it was pretty cute!
  3. 0
    I have always gotten back positive feedback from strangers. Most people are quite impressed and have more respect for me. I purposely choose not to tell people. Heck, sometimes I forget that I'm a nurse! I just feel that when I tell people what I do sometimes, it gives them the wrong idea. Sometimes people want to get closer to me for some kind of motive. I know it sounds paranoid, but I have had friends come out of the wood work, gotten into arguments with relatives, family, and friends because they want me to give them money or pay for everything.
  4. 0
    Strange! Usually when someone knows your a nurse they start asking you all about their health problems and what does it mean! I've never gotten a negative attitude about nursing, just people looking for free advice. I don't mind but I don't advertise I'm a nurse either. There is a myth that nurses are rich out there though, lol. If only that were true. Sure you can make good money especially with overtime as a slave to work but I don't think that makes one rich! Nursing pays the bills, that's all!
  5. 1
    When I was young and a new nurse, I was so proud of my profession. People responded positively when they knew I was a nurse.

    Now when someone tells me they want to be a nurse I am a bit more reticent. I know how difficult schools are to get in. I know attrition rates. I understand student loans. I understand the work involved once you pass boards. I know the agony of leaving your children to care for others. I understand what it means to be a nurse.

    I wish them well. I ask questions to see if they have thought it out. I am not as excited for them to become nurses as I used to be. Supportive, but more realistic.

    I can well understand the negativity the OP sees if in a depressed area where many family members have been turned down for slots in school. The money looks really good to those who have little and the possibility of one of their family getting the same job does not exist. I am sorry you are getting those responses.

    The best response I know is to be the best nurse you can be. They may never come around but perhaps one will figure out that their cousin, brother, sister, whatever could not do what you do as well. It might take showing your A&P, Micro. etc. books to at least one.

    Hold your head high. You are a nurse.
    trixie333 likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from KelRN215
    I have never had any anger or resentment as a reaction to my telling people I am a nurse. The only people I don't want to broadcast it to are my neighbors... because I don't want any "my kid fell, my husband is sick, my wife's in labor" knocks on my door.
    Let 'em think you're a hospice nurse..........scares 'em off. And if it doesn't just ask them if they've tried Roxanol and Ativan..................

    More to the point of the thread, I've had neutral or positive reactions when people ask what I do.......as far as getting wealthy, if people are crass enough to ask what I make, I tell them the truth. About the same as what I made in the petroleum industry......20 years ago (which is fine and was/is my choice).
  7. 0
    Three responses I get are usually this... or a combination of these -

    1. So proud of you!! (recent grad)
    2. Nurse = Ca$h omg
    3. Face of disgust when I tell them my specialty (burn)
  8. 1
    Quote from aknottedyarn
    When I was young and a new nurse, I was so proud of my profession. People responded positively when they knew I was a nurse.

    Now when someone tells me they want to be a nurse I am a bit more reticent. I know how difficult schools are to get in. I know attrition rates. I understand student loans. I understand the work involved once you pass boards. I know the agony of leaving your children to care for others. I understand what it means to be a nurse.

    I wish them well. I ask questions to see if they have thought it out. I am not as excited for them to become nurses as I used to be. Supportive, but more realistic.

    I can well understand the negativity the OP sees if in a depressed area where many family members have been turned down for slots in school. The money looks really good to those who have little and the possibility of one of their family getting the same job does not exist. I am sorry you are getting those responses.

    The best response I know is to be the best nurse you can be. They may never come around but perhaps one will figure out that their cousin, brother, sister, whatever could not do what you do as well. It might take showing your A&P, Micro. etc. books to at least one.

    Hold your head high. You are a nurse.
    Seems like its a socioeconomic problem. I am a little surprised that more nurses haven't encounter this. Looks like the answer is to move to an area of greater prosperity. Thank you everyone for your replies and Merry Christmas.
    fasnv likes this.
  9. 0
    Sometimes I get a story about how the nurse was never around while they were inpatient somewhere.It makes me so made and a little defensive at the same time to here that. I know theres no excuse to have pts waiting for care but what they dont realize as I did not before becoming a nurse is the big juggling act going on behind the scene.Its amazing and keeping people breathing sometimes takes priority over other things at that given moment.I agree people need to have there needs meet and i know staffing is not always sufficient making are jobs a lot harder to manage
  10. 0
    People generally react with surprise, I'm in my mid 20's and look 18. They think I'm too young. Then they ask where I work, I say palliatve and they get sad and akward.

    Only ever had one really negative reaction. A friends mom, a secretary whos never worked in health care, proceeded to tell me all that is wrong with nursing and how awful she thinks nurses are.

    I live in an area with a high cost of living so a nurses salary is average. I do get the "you have a job, you pay" from my student and bum friends.


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