Meth is destroying communities - page 6

I am originally from a small town in southern West Virginia. I have lived away from the area for about 8 years now, but I continue to go back 3-4 times a year to visit family and friends. I have... Read More

  1. by   blueheaven
    I agree you can't be judgemental and let your frustration affect your care, but...sometimes I wish just one of them cleaned up after their brushes with death. Usually they just leave AMA when they are ambulatory, so they can go out...and use. The strain on their loved ones and families is tremendous and heartbreaking.

    guess what? I had one of these patients today...[/QUOTE]


    Some of you need to go to some open meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymus and SEE that there ARE those that DO recover. I know many people who have acheived and maintained living clean and sober through these programs.
  2. by   WVUturtle514
    Quote from blueheaven
    Some of you need to go to some open meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymus and SEE that there ARE those that DO recover. I know many people who have acheived and maintained living clean and sober through these programs.
    According to the statistics on the show I watched, the recovery rate of meth addicts is about 6%......the lowest of all drugs.
  3. by   WillowBrook
    Quote from loriannlpn
    Thank you for your post's. Have you ever thought about doing public speaking? Your story seems very powerful, you could help people who have lost their way.

    Do you find talking about your experience is a form of therapy?

    Have a blessed day
    Thank you I was, at one stage, going to be involved with an Education program for school kids with former addicts going in and talking about their experiences but funding for it was cut so it never came to fruition. These days I'm more or less housebound due to chronic and severe anxiety, with borderline psychosis, paranoid ideations and depressive symptoms. I think I probably would have developed Mental health issues regardless of past drug use, but the Drugs certainly didn't help and also like many others I did use drugs to cope with the symptoms of Mental illness. I accepted I had a problem but I refused medication or help for it...I thought I could get over it if I just "got my s*it together". I personally think that instead of Govts throwing money towards the so called "war on drugs" and making penalties for users harsher, they should put more money towards education and destigmatisation about Mental Illnesses and better care and resources for sufferers. If people with Mental Illness had access to good quality affordable and expediate care without fear of stigma or judgement by society, I think you could almost solve the entire drug problem of the western world.
  4. by   December716
    Quote from mommy2boys
    We have a huge meth problem in the town next to us (we also have a big problem in my town. The town was know for being the meth capital of the state (possible in the US) back in the 90's.

    My husband is a correctional officer for our county and sees the daily problems associated w/ meth (crime, hiv/ hep, child abuse/ neglect, etc) This drug is completely out of control because of the cheapness, ease of making it, and ease of finding the material for making it. One of the main ingredients for making it is an OTC decongestant. Almost anyone w/ a little chemistry knowledge can make it which makes it that much more dangerous.

    One of the things that stores/state laws are starting to do in our area is to limit the amount of the OTC drug (2-3 boxes at a time) that you may buy at one time and locking up the med so it is harder to steal.

    If you are truely worried about the town you grew up in maybe you could contact the local police dept or mayor and see what you can do to help. There are different groups that go out and try to help the community. It is so sad to say, but meth is here and it is killing more and more of our citizens.

    Erin (who has seen what meth can do to a community first hand)
    I was born and raised in the area you are referring to. (Sad you don't even need to give the name for me to know that). I don't know if it's getting worse, or if I'm just not used to it anymore since I've lived in Seattle for the last three years, but I was just down there and it seemed worse than ever. Outside the new Super Wal-Mart, my husband and I were harassed by a group of guys who were obviously on meth, wanting money. They would not take no for an answer. It was actually quite scary. You shouldn't have to feel unsafe in a town of 9,000 people, but when meth is involved, it makes everything unsafe!
  5. by   traumaRUs
    Willowbrook - with my son it started with depression and has spiralled downward. I truly wish you the best. I hope that you can get to a happier place. You have so much to offer.

    I want to publicly thank everyone for their support. Thank you.
  6. by   Kitnurse
    Another voice for compassion, here. We have no idea whats behind the situations we see in our clinics and hospital ERs, and on the streets. I'm no angel and prior to my nursing career I had my share of years that are now a blur due to meth, pot, alcohol and other things.(I am now certified by an addictionologist to be psychologically sound)
    I saw people crash, burn and die from it all, and others, many of them nurses, who sailed through, functioning with society as addicts for whom the bad effects never showed up. Each of us is individual, and there is no way of knowing how anything,from drugs to simple stress, will effect us untill it happens.
    We nurses have a bad habit of making judgements about people in our care because we only see the disasterous end results, not the step by step process of less than ideal decisions that lead to it.
    I find my background in addiction and the grey area beyond/beneath "normal society" where functional addicts live, gives me a sense of perspective and compassion for my patients. While I do not condone addictive behavior, I do understand it, and the reasoning, such as it is, behind the actions.
    To a certain degree my past also gives me a much better tuned "********-o-meter" when presented with a line of delusion/rationalization by an addict. It helps keep my compassion from getting gooey and unprofessional.
  7. by   australianrn
    I get so sad and depressed when I read about the problem of drugs. Its so aweful, so many wasted lives. So many hurt and damaged people, children not cared for. Horrible.
  8. by   AddictionsRN
    :caduceus:I agree with you that Meth is in epidemic proportions all over the country. It is sad that it is stealing the souls from our neighborhoods. In the small communities that someone mentioned earlier, it is more evident now due to the ratio of the amount of those addicted to the number of folks living in that small town.

    One thing I'd like to mention, especially for those of you who see them in your nursing practice. Don't judge them, help them heal. You can find out what your resources are in your communities for help, and offer them those resources as a part of your nursing care. If we as nurses, sit back and offer judgments, and how the country is going to h*ll, we are part of the problem, UNLESS we offer solutions, of what is out there for help: Narcotics Anonymous phone numbers, Recovery home phone numbers, treatment programs, etc. It is not too hard to find out this kind of information. You should be able to find resources online, or in your local phone book. Alcoholics Anonymous should be listed in the white pages of your phone book. Start by giving them a call and tell them why you are calling and if they have some phone numbers that you can share with those very ill patients that you care for so you can be part of the solution!

    It is very sad, however, remember that ADDICTION is a DISEASE, not a moral weakness. There is documented scientific evidence to support this fact. As with any disease, we may not like or approve of what went on to get them in the shape they are in, but as someone else has mentioned, it wasn't there choice to become addicted when they started. They may have chosen to use drugs/or whatever, to try it out, but when they have lost the choice to use or not, they have crossed the line into addiction.

    Keep up the good work, there are lots of folks out there that need your help!

  9. by   chadash
    I hate to be so ignorant, but could someone explain what meth is and how it effects people?
    Had some people who were to do work on my house once, who never completed the job, though they did take my money (said they were sick, had no insurance, I did feel bad for them) and found out later they were on methadone from a clinic dealing with some addictions. Is this used to get people off other drugs?
  10. by   mercyteapot
    They are two different things. Meth refers to methamphetamine. Methadone is, as you thought, given to people attempting to break addictions to other drugs, most notably heroin.

    http://www.nida.nih.gov/Infofacts/methamphetamine.html
  11. by   LoveMyBugs
    Quote from chadash
    I hate to be so ignorant, but could someone explain what meth is and how it effects people?
    Had some people who were to do work on my house once, who never completed the job, though they did take my money (said they were sick, had no insurance, I did feel bad for them) and found out later they were on methadone from a clinic dealing with some addictions. Is this used to get people off other drugs?
    Meth is methanphtamine, its street name can be meth, crystal, ice and dope. When you take meth you really dont get a feeling of being high but rather, like you can do anything. You are able to stay awake and have bounds of energy, your not hungary and unable to eat food taste bland. I used meth for a very short time about a month 8 years ago, and my exhusband is n addict. For the time I used it I lost 30lbs. However it does take more and more to get the "feeling" for myself I relized that I did not want to become an addict that I wasnt going to let meth control my life, and I was able to stop. Sadley my ex wasnt able to. Those that become addicted loose weight, are unable to sleep, or eat they are driven to get their fix. They resort to lying, stealing to get money to pay for the drug. My ex returned two cases of diapers to get the money to buy more meth, when I asked where were they cases of diapers for the kids he tried to tell me that somone broke in and stole the diapers. So an addict will do anything just to get the fix.
  12. by   Midwest4me
    Quote from mellomom
    The strain on their loved ones and families is tremendous and heartbreaking...
    You are so very right about the tremendous strain on families! I posted a thread here a few mos. ago about the overwhelming shock at learning that one of our daughters(26 yrs old, mother of 5) was using meth. Her life continues to decline ...as do the lives of her children. She is separated from her husband(our son-in-law who takes care of the kids but does his own share of neglect and has a meth user girlfriend living with him and the kids) and has little contact with the kids because our son-in-law won't allow her to see the kids. Another adult male also lives in the house and there are recent concerns that the youngest granddaughter(3 yrs) is being sexually molested by that adult male. Our calls to the police and CSD have been futile. Despite our emphasis that we are "mandatory reporters of suspected abuse", neither the police nor CSD have pulled the two granddaughters to thoroughly examine them to see if this could be true!!! This drug meth has created: (1) a monster of our daughter, (i.e. a true "user" in every sense of the word to the point where we don't even know her anymore) and (2) victims of the neediest---our grandchildren.
  13. by   RN_N_DA_MAKN
    [QUOTE=Roy Fokker

    As a healthcare worker, I advise clients against drug useage.
    As a free human being, I believe people should be free to do what they want to their own bodies.

    That's all I have to say about that.

    [/QUOTE]

    I agree with your statement to an extent-not my place to judge anyone. However, my problem lies with the fact that these are the very same people that are mugging, robbing, and murdering innocent people to support their "freedom to do what they want to they want to their own bodies."
    I Do have a problem with that!

close